PHYS 2443 Modern Physics - 4 Credits

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PHYS 2443 Modern Physics - 4 creditsThis is the third of a sequence of three Physics courses (Physics 3.3). The prerequisites forthis course are Physics 1441-1442, or else Physics 1433-1434 with the permission of thedepartmental chair. Selected topics in modern physics include: Relativity, black holes,astrophysics and cosmology, quantum mechanics and its applications, nuclear physics andelementary particle physics. The laboratory component of the class includes experimentswhich led to the development of quantum mechanics, and also explores some of itsapplications.Course-specific Learning OutcomesUpon successful completion of Modern Physics, students should be able to:1.2.3.4.5.6.7.8.9.10.11.12.13.Demonstrate an understanding of various optical phenomena such as interference,diffraction and polarization.Give examples of situations in which light as well as electrons behave like a wave and aparticle.Demonstrate knowledge of the postulates of the special theory of relativity.Display an understanding of the various physical effects which occur for objectstraveling close to the speed of light.Cite some of the historical experiments and observations that gave rise to early quantumtheory.Show a comprehension of the basic features of the early models of the atom and theassociated atomic spectra.Have an appreciation of various aspects of physics which are actively being exploredtoday, such as condensed matter, elementary particle physics and astrophysics.Read a laboratory manual and follow the procedureWrite a technical report of a given formatEmploy scientific reasoning and logical thinkingDevelop problem-solving strategyAnalyze and model idealized physical processesApply mathematical skills to physical systemsGeneral education learning outcomesUpon completion of this course a student will be able to:1. Discuss the scope of physics as a natural science, and practical applications of fundamental research toreal world problems.2. Describe the elements of the scientific method and its significance to scientific discoveries, thedevelopment of models, and the formulation of scientific theories.3. Employ pictorial, graphical and mathematical methods to simplify and solve problems relevant to realworld applications.4. Acquire and practice basic laboratory skills including gathering, analyzing and interpreting data.5. Practice communication and writing skills in class discussions, preparation of written laboratory reports,and independent project work.6. Practice collaborative work during laboratory activities.7. Work with teams, including those of diverse composition.8. Communicate information about physical systems in a logical and clear manner.Pathways learning outcomesUpon completion of this course a student will be able to:

1. Discuss the scope of physics as a natural science, and practical applications of fundamental research toreal world problems.2. Describe the elements of the scientific method and its significance to scientific discoveries, thedevelopment of models, and the formulation of scientific theories.3. Employ pictorial, graphical and mathematical methods to simplify and solve problems relevant to realworld applications.4. Acquire and practice basic laboratory skills including gathering, analyzing and interpreting data.5. Practice communication and writing skills in class discussions, preparation of written laboratory reports,and independent project work.9. Practice collaborative work during laboratory activities.10. Work with teams, including those of diverse composition.11. Communicate information about physical systems in a logical and clear manner.Assessment ToolsThe modes of assessment support the learning outcomes: Two in-class examinationsAn in-class final examinationLaboratory reportsLaboratory oral presentationThe laboratory oral presentation is based on a research project topic that the instructor assigns toeach student. The topics focus on specific experiments and predictions from quantum mechanics,Relativity and astrophysics.GradingThe final grade is based on the following: Average of two 1 hour and 40 min. examinationsLaboratory GradeResearch projectFinal examination 40% 25% 10% 25%LaboratoryThis course is based on doing computer-based experiments in physics and traditionalexperiments. Although the experiments are done in-group, each student must write and type hisown individual laboratory report. It consists of a title page, data sheet, computations, graphs,discussions and questions.Textbooks Physics for Scientists & Engineers with Modern Physics, Volume IIIby Giancoli, 4th Edition. Pearson- Prentice Hall. Departmental handout materials Departmental handouts for Laboratory experimentsAccessibility StatementCity Tech is committed to supporting the educational goals of enrolled students with disabilities in the areas ofenrollment, academic advisement, tutoring, assistive technologies and testing accommodations. If you have orthink you may have a disability, you may be eligible for reasonable accommodations or academic adjustments

as provided under applicable federal, state and city laws. You may also request services for temporaryconditions or medical issues under certain circumstances. If you have questions about your eligibility or wouldlike to seek accommodation services or academic adjustments, please contact the Center for StudentAccessibility by phone 718-260-5143, or online at http://www.citytech.cuny.edu/accessibility/ .TopicsWeek12Topic & ChapterChapterSpecial Theory of Relativitya. Galilean – Newtonian Relativity & speed of light36b. Postulates of the Special Theory of Relativityc. Time Dilation and Length ContractionSpecial Theory of Relativitya. Lorentz Transformationsb. Relativistic Momentum and Mass36c. E mc2; Mass and Energyd. Doppler Shift for LightAstrophysics and Cosmologya. Stars and Galaxiesb. Stellar Evolution: Nucleosynthesis, and the Birth andDeath of Stars44c. Distance Measurementsd. General Relativity: Gravity and the Curvature of SpaceProblems1, 2, 813, 38, 4117, 18, 203Astrophysics and Cosmologya. The Expanding Universe: Redshift and Hubble’s Lawb. The Big Bang and the Cosmic Microwave Background 44c. The Standard Cosmological Model: The Early Universe45Astrophysics and Cosmology36, 53, 54, 5844a. Inflationb. Dark Matter and Dark Energyc. Large-Scale Structure of the UniverseExam 167Early Quantum Theory and Model of the Atoma. Electromagnetic wavesb. Planck’s Quantum Hypothesisc. Photon Theory; Photoelectric Effect37d. Photon Energy, Mass and Momentume. Wave – Particle Duality; the Principle ofComplementarityf. Wave Nature of Matterg. Early Models of the Atom and the Bohr ModelQuantum Mechanicsa. The Wave Function and the Heisenberg UncertaintyPrinciple38b. The Schrödinger Equation and examples of its solutionin one dimensionc. Tunneling through a BarrierQuantum Mechanics10,17,415,18,24

a. Hydrogen Atom: Schrödinger Equation and WaveFunctionb. Complex Atoms: the Exclusion Principle and Periodic89393,28,34Table of ElementsQuantum Mechanicsa. X-Ray Spectrab. Lasers and HolographyQuantum Mechanics of Solids39-40a. Bonding in Molecules and Potential-Energy Diagramsfor Moleculesb. Molecular Spectrac. Bonding in SolidsQuantum Mechanics of Solidsd. Drude Free-Electron Theory of Metals; Fermi Energye. Band Theory of Solidsf. Semiconductors and Doping40g. Applications: Semiconductor Diodes, Transistors andChips (Integrated Circuits)Exam 239-41,40-1, 40-826,31,43,5410Nuclear Physics and Radioactivitya. Structure and Properties of the Nucleusb. Binding Energy and Nuclear Forcesc. Radioactivity: Alpha, Beta and Gamma Decaysd. Conservation Laws in Nuclear Physicse. Detection and application of Radiation4125,27,39,411112131415Nuclear Energy; Effects and Uses of Radiationa.Nuclear Reactions and the Transmutation ofElementsb.Nuclear Fission; Nuclear Reactorsc. Nuclear Fusion42d. Application of Nuclear Physics: Dosimetry, RadiationTherapy, Tracers in Research and Medicine, Imaging byTomography: CAT Scans and EmissionTomography,Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), Magnetic ResonanceImaging (MRI)Elementary Particle Physicsa. High-Energy Particles and Acceleratorsb. Particles and Antiparticles43c. Particle Interactions and Conservations Lawsd. Neutrinose. Particle Classificationf. Particle Stability and ResonancesElementary Particle Physicsa. Strangeness? Charm? Towards a New Model43-44b. Quarksc. The Standard Model: QCD and Electroweak Theory,Strings and supersymmetryd. Grand Unified Theoriese. Strings and supersymmetryFinal Exam5,7,23,371,9,11Ch.43 - 45,65

Laboratory tation and introduction to ExcelProperty of electromagnetic waves: Interference, Polarization and Dispersion of lightProperty of electromagnetic waves: Interference, Polarization and Dispersion of microwavesPhotons: Photoelectric EffectCharge of electronMeasurements of e/m for Electron and mass of electronDiffraction of electronsStudy of Spectral lines and Rydberg ConstantMeasurements of e/m for ElectronAn open cavity laser: He-Ne laserHolographya, b and g-Radiation: Radiation detection and absorptionPrinciples of acceleration of elementary particles: electronSimulations of Dark Matter15.Oral presentation of the Research project

PHYS 2443 Modern Physics - 4 credits . This is the third of a sequence of three Physics courses (Physics 3.3). The prerequisites for this course are Physics 1441-1442, or else Physics 1433-1434 with the permission of the departmental chair. Selected topics in modern physics