The Stress And Msd Study-PDF Free Download

The stress and MSD study
29 May 2020 | 36 views | 0 downloads | 153 Pages | 2.57 MB

Share Pdf : The Stress And Msd Study

Download and Preview : The Stress And Msd Study


Report CopyRight/DMCA Form For : The Stress And Msd Study



Transcription

Health Safety, The role of work stress and psychological factors in the. development of musculoskeletal disorders,The stress and MSD study. Dr Jason Devereux,Dr Leif Rydstedt,Dr Vincent Kelly. Dr Paul Weston,Prof Peter Buckle,Robens Centre for Health Ergonomics. University of Surrey, This research was conducted to establish the role of stress and other psychological factors on the.
development and reporting of musculoskeletal disorders. A prospective epidemiological cohort study design was chosen This comprised a baseline cross. sectional study of 8 000 workers of whom 3 139 were followed for 15 months approx The cohort was. drawn from 20 organisations across 11 industrial sectors in the U K. Extrinsic effort intrinsic effort role conflict and verbal abuse or confrontations with clients or the. general public were psychosocial workplace risk factors for high perceived job stress Individual factors. such as age gender neuroticism rumination and lay beliefs about the causes and alleviation of stress. were unlikely to be involved in the development of high perceived job stress. High perceived job stress was an intermediate factor between high exposure to both physical and. psychosocial work risk factors and self reported low back upper back and hands wrists complaints. Psychosomatic symptoms depression and perceived life stress may act independently to increase the. likelihood of developing musculoskeletal complaints. This report and the work it describes were funded by the Health and Safety Executive HSE Its. contents including any opinions and or conclusions expressed are those of the authors alone and do. not necessarily reflect HSE policy,Crown copyright 2004. First published 2004,ISBN 0 7176 2903 1, All rights reserved No part of this publication may be. reproduced stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in. any form or by any means electronic mechanical, photocopying recording or otherwise without the prior. written permission of the copyright owner, Applications for reproduction should be made in writing to. Licensing Division Her Majesty s Stationery Office. St Clements House 2 16 Colegate Norwich NR3 1BQ, or by e mail to hmsolicensing cabinet office x gsi gov uk.
Acknowledgements, The principal investigator Dr Jason Devereux acknowledges the constructive comments. during the preparation of this report by Professor Adrian Furnham University College London. Mr Trevor Shaw and colleagues HSE,CONTENTS V,EXECUTIVE SUMMARY VII. 1 INTRODUCTION 1,2 WORK UNDERTAKEN IN THE STRESS AND MSD STUDY 5. 2 1 THE STRESS AND MSD STUDY 6,2 2 ANALYSES FOR WORK RELATED STRESS 10. 2 3 ANALYSES FOR WORK RELATED MUSCULOSKELETAL COMPLAINTS 14. 3 WORK RELATED STRESS 20,3 1 STAGE I ANALYSES FOR WORK RELATED STRESS 21.
3 2 STAGE II ANALYSES FOR WORK RELATED STRESS 27,3 3 CONCLUSIONS ON WORK RELATED STRESS 28. 4 SELF REPORTED LOW BACK COMPLAINTS 29, 4 1 STAGE I ANALYSES FOR SELF REPORTED LOW BACK COMPLAINTS 30. 4 2 STAGE II ANALYSES FOR SELF REPORTED LOW BACK COMPLAINTS 33. 4 3 CONCLUSIONS ON SELF REPORTED LOW BACK COMPLAINTS 35. 5 SELF REPORTED UPPER BACK COMPLAINTS 36, 5 1 STAGE I ANALYSES FOR SELF REPORTED UPPER BACK COMPLAINTS 37. 5 2 STAGE II ANALYSES FOR SELF REPORTED UPPER BACK COMPLAINTS 39. 5 3 CONCLUSIONS ON SELF REPORTED UPPER BACK COMPLAINTS 41. 6 SELF REPORTED NECK COMPLAINTS 43, 6 1 STAGE I ANALYSES FOR SELF REPORTED NECK COMPLAINTS 44. 6 2 STAGE II ANALYSES FOR SELF REPORTED NECK COMPLAINTS 47. 6 3 CONCLUSIONS ON SELF REPORTED NECK COMPLAINTS 49. 7 SELF REPORTED SHOULDER COMPLAINTS 51, 7 1 STAGE I ANALYSES FOR SELF REPORTED SHOULDER COMPLAINTS 51.
7 2 STAGE II ANALYSES FOR SELF REPORTED SHOULDER COMPLAINTS 54. 7 3 CONCLUSIONS ON SELF REPORTED SHOULDER COMPLAINTS 56. 8 SELF REPORTED ELBOW FOREARM COMPLAINTS 57, 8 1 STAGE I ANALYSES FOR SELF REPORTED ELBOW FOREARM COMPLAINTS. 8 2 STAGE II ANALYSES FOR SELF REPORTED ELBOW FOREARM COMPLAINTS. 8 3 CONCLUSIONS ON SELF REPORTED ELBOW FOREARM COMPLAINTS. 9 SELF REPORTED HAND WRIST COMPLAINTS 63, 9 1 STAGE I ANALYSES FOR SELF REPORTED HAND WRIST COMPLAINTS. 9 2 STAGE II ANALYSES FOR SELF REPORTED HAND WRIST COMPLAINTS. 9 3 CONCLUSIONS ON SELF REPORTED HAND WRIST COMPLAINTS 69. 10 DISCUSSION 70,10 1 POTENTIAL BIAS IN THE STUDY 70. 10 2 RISK FACTORS FOR WORK RELATED STRESS 72, 10 3 COMPARISON OF THE STRESS RESULTS WITH OTHER STUDIES 72. 10 4 HEALTH OUTCOMES ASSOCIATED WITH PERCEIVED JOB STRESS 73. 10 5 RISK FACTORS FOR SELF REPORTED MUSCULOSKELETAL COMPLAINTS. 10 6 COMPARISON OF THE STUDY WITH OTHER STUDIES ON. MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS 74,10 7 GENERALISABILITY OF THE RESULTS 75.
10 8 IMPLICATIONS OF THE RESEARCH FOR INDUSTRY 76,10 9 FURTHER WORK NEEDED 76. 11 REFERENCES 77,APPENDIX 1 ANALYSES ON WORK RELATED STRESS 84. APPENDIX 2 ANALYSES ON SELF REPORTED LOW BACK COMPLAINTS. APPENDIX 3 ANALYSES ON SELF REPORTED UPPER BACK COMPLAINTS. APPENDIX 4 ANALYSES ON SELF REPORTED NECK COMPLAINTS. APPENDIX 5 ANALYSES ON SELF REPORTED SHOULDER COMPLAINTS. APPENDIX 6 ANALYSES ON SELF REPORTED ELBOW FOREARM. COMPLAINTS 108, APPENDIX 7 ANALYSES ON SELF REPORTED HAND WRIST COMPLAINTS. APPENDIX 8 THE QUESTIONNAIRE 116,APPENDIX 9 PILOT STUDY 121. APPENDIX 10 VALIDATION OF STUDY MEASURES 122,EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.
This research was conducted to establish the role of stress and other psychological factors on the. development and reporting of musculoskeletal disorders There were two main objectives. Firstly to investigate factors that increased the likelihood of reporting high perceived job stress. and secondly to investigate whether high perceived job stress and other stress reactions. increased the likelihood of reporting musculoskeletal complaints. A prospective epidemiological cohort study design was chosen This comprised a baseline. cross sectional study of 8 000 workers of whom 3 139 were followed for 15 months approx. The cohort was drawn from 20 organisations across 11 industrial sectors in the U K. A questionnaire was used to collect the baseline and follow up data Physical and psychosocial. work factors demographics organisation factors individual trait attitude and well being. factors stress reactions perceived job stress perceived life stress depression mental strain. psychosomatic symptoms and musculoskeletal complaints were measured at baseline see. Appendix 8 The follow up questionnaire measured perceived job stress and musculoskeletal. complaints, Separate cross sectional and prospective analyses were performed using multiple logistic. regression modelling for high perceived job stress and musculoskeletal complaints of the lower. back upper back neck shoulders elbows forearms and hands wrists The analyses considered. whether the factors associated with the outcomes at baseline also increased the likelihood of. developing the outcomes in the follow up This established association and time order between. variables two essential criteria for causation, Response rate The response rate for the baseline cross sectional study was 39 n 3139 with. company rates varying between 10 80 Of the respondents about 70 were white collar. workers e g office workers computer operators technicians etc and 30 were blue collar. workers e g delivery drivers manual handlers production line workers oil rig workers An. 86 response rate was obtained for the follow up questionnaire after excluding those who had. left the participating organisations,Job stress and musculoskeletal disorders. Results of individual factors for job stress Individual factors such as age gender neuroticism. rumination and lay beliefs about the causes and alleviation of stress were associated with. reporting high perceived job stress However none of these factors increased the likelihood of. reporting this outcome among workers who developed high perceived job stress during the. Results of workplace factors for job stress In the base line cross sectional study workers. highly exposed to both physical always or often working with the back in an awkward position. and psychosocial work risk factors extrinsic effort intrinsic effort role ambiguity role conflict. and verbal abuse or confrontations with clients or the general public had the greatest likelihood. of reporting high perceived job stress, A tentative interaction effect indicated by a departure from an additive model between. physical and psychosocial workplace risk factors was observed in the base line cross sectional. study High exposure to both physical and psychosocial work risk factors did not increase the. likelihood of reporting high perceived job stress during the follow up. The psychosocial work factors associated with reporting high perceived job stress in the cross. sectional study and which also increased the likelihood of reporting the outcome in the follow. up study were extrinsic effort intrinsic effort role conflict and verbal abuse or confrontations. with clients or the general public, Extrinsic effort concerns job demands such as constant time pressure interruptions and.
disturbances at work job responsibility pressure to work overtime and increasing demands of. the job Intrinsic effort in this study refers to an individual coping pattern characterised by. being overwhelmed by time pressures inability to relax and switch off after work and. sacrificing too much for the job Role conflict concerns the need to do things differently. dealing with incompatible requests conflict with personal values and having assignments. without adequate resources Verbal abuse or confrontations with clients or the general public. also implies conflict but with external relations outside of the work organisation. Other psychosocial work factors such as role ambiguity social support rewards job future. ambiguity decision latitude and threat of physical harm or injury did not increase the likelihood. of reporting high perceived job stress in both the cross sectional study and the follow up study. Results of individual factors for musculoskeletal complaints Lay beliefs about the causes and. alleviation of stress did not increase the likelihood of reporting new episodes of self reported. musculoskeletal complaints, In general individual factors such as neuroticism rumination job satisfaction negative mood. and demographics were not implicated in the causation of self reported musculoskeletal. complaints However increasing age was a significant factor for both self reported. elbows forearm complaints and for shoulder complaints whilst being female was a significant. factor for reporting shoulder complaints, Results of workplace factors for musculoskeletal complaints In the cross sectional study high. exposure to both physical and psychosocial work risk factors was associated with the reporting. of low back upper back neck shoulder elbow forearm and hand wrist musculoskeletal. complaints The specific risk factors are shown in the summary box below A tentative. interaction effect between physical and psychosocial workplace risk factors was observed for. the lower back the neck the shoulder the elbow forearm and the hand wrists but not for the. upper back, In the follow up study high exposure to both physical and psychosocial work risk factors also. increased the likelihood of reporting new episodes of self reported low back neck shoulder. elbow forearm and hand wrist complaints High exposure to both physical and psychosocial. work risk factors did not increase the likelihood of reporting new episodes of upper back. complaints, Results of individual stress reactions for musculoskeletal complaints Psychosomatic symptoms. increased the likelihood of reporting new episodes of self reported upper back shoulder and. hand wrist complaints Depression increased the likelihood of new episodes of self reported. musculoskeletal complaints affecting the upper back neck and elbows forearms Perceived life. stress increased the likelihood of new episodes of self reported shoulder complaints. A summary of the physical and psychosocial work risk factors for each body region is presented. in the box below, Low Back Physical work risk factors Psychosocial work risk factors.
Complaints lifting 6 15 kilograms greater than 10 extrinsic effort. times per hour or lifting greater than 16 intrinsic effort. kg at all and always often working with role conflict. the back in an awkward position threat of physical harm or injury. pushing and pulling objects combined,with tasks requiring lifting. Neck Physical work risk factors Psychosocial work risk factors. complaints lifting 6 15 kilograms greater than 10 intrinsic effort. times per hour or lifting greater than 16 job future ambiguity. kg at all and always often working with verbal abuse and or. the back in an awkward position confrontations with clients or the. working with the head neck bent or general public,twisted excessively. vibration from a power tool or machine,that made the hands vibrate during the. sitting and using a computer more than,half the time. seated for 30 minutes or more without a,break whilst carrying out work.
Shoulder Physical work risk factors Psychosocial work risk factors. complaints working with the head neck bent or low social support. twisted excessively low reward, lifting 6 15 kilograms greater than 10 job future ambiguity. times per hour or lifting greater than 16 threat of harm injury. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Aim This research was conducted to establish the role of stress and other psychological factors on the development and reporting of musculoskeletal

Related Books

MERIT Customer Specific Requirements

MERIT Customer Specific Requirements

MERIT Customer Specific Requirements For Use with ISO 9001 2015 And IATF16949 2016 Effective August 31 2018 1

KUNDENSPEZIFISCHE ANFORDERUNGEN CUSTOMER SPECIFIC

KUNDENSPEZIFISCHE ANFORDERUNGEN CUSTOMER SPECIFIC

KUNDENSPEZIFISCHE ANFORDERUNGEN CUSTOMER SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS Kundenspezifische Anforderungen der BMW Group in Erg nzung zu den Anforderungen der IATF 16949 2016 Customer specific requirements of the BMW Group in addition to the requirements of IATF 16949 2016 Ausdrucke unterliegen nicht dem nderungsdienst Printouts are not subject to the change service Kundenspezifische

Global Supplier Manual Appendix D Daimler AG Customer

Global Supplier Manual Appendix D Daimler AG Customer

Ensure requirements are met in their supply chain 1 0 Customer Specific Requirements IATF16949 section 4 3 2 Supplier shall be aware consider and meet DAG MBST 2016 requirements all sections which are interpretable for sub Tier 1 suppliers 2 0 Quality Management System Documentation IATF16949 section 7 5 1 1

Supplier Requirements Manual Continental USA

Supplier Requirements Manual Continental USA

4 9 1 Standard Packaging Requirements 4 9 2 Standard Pallet Requirements 4 9 3 Standard flexible intermediate bulk container FIBC also known as bulk bag or big bag Requirements 4 9 4 Standard Transportation Requirements 4 10 Product Marking and Labeling 4 10 1 Packaging Unit 4 10 2 Shipping Unit 4 10 3 Health and Safety Labels

SUPPLIER QUALITY MANUAL Customer Specific Requirements

SUPPLIER QUALITY MANUAL Customer Specific Requirements

component will comply with VALEO requirements The VALEO AQP pp is attached in the Appendix 1 all mentioned appendix are part of the Supplier Quality Manual VALEO AQP pp shall apply to all VALEO suppliers listed here below Category of supplier Definition Designer Design components which will be fit for VALEO project specific purposes and will meet VALEO specifications The supplier

AUDI AG Quality Manual Customer Specific Requirements

AUDI AG Quality Manual Customer Specific Requirements

AUDI AG Quality Manual Version 3 0 Page 1 of 23 As at 06 10 09 Only for information The German version of the AUDI AG Quality Manual is binding Reife Produkte Robuste Prozesse Mature Products Robust Processes Excellent Customer Care AUDI AG Quality Manual This AUDI AG Quality Manual sets out contractually agreed requirements of AUDI AG to safeguard the quality of parts and processes in the

CUSTOMER SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS AKWEL

CUSTOMER SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS AKWEL

IATF16949 and OEMs Customer Specific Requirements establishes the fundamental quality management system requirements that AKWEL and its subsidiaries has established for our suppliers Additional requirements noted specifically on a contract purchase order drawing or specification shall be complied with and will take precedence over the requirements stipulated by this document AKWEL will

IATF 16949 Customer Specific Requirements

IATF 16949 Customer Specific Requirements

No additional requirements 4 3 2 Customer specific requirements No additional requirements 4 4 Quality management system and its processes 4 4 1 No additional requirements 4 4 1 1 Conformance of products and processes No additional requirements 4 4 1 2 Product safety No additional requirements 4 4 2 No additional requirements 5 Leadership

ILLUSTRATED PARTS MANUAL MANUEL DE PI CES D TACH ES

ILLUSTRATED PARTS MANUAL MANUEL DE PI CES D TACH ES

Briggs amp Stratton Accessories 30 32 Wiring Harness Schematic 33 25 Table of Contents Thank you for purchasing your new equipment It was carefully engineered to provide excellent performance when properly operated and maintained All information in this manual is relative to the most recent

PDFen ligne fr MANUEL D INSTRUCTIONS TONDEUSE THERMIQUE

PDFen ligne fr MANUEL D INSTRUCTIONS TONDEUSE THERMIQUE

manuel d instructions tondeuse thermique gl to 675eb 56 ac sp 4in1 notice originale a conserver pour future reference lire attentivement avant toute utilisation num ro de s rie mod le jl56z c2

PDFen ligne fr MANUEL D INSTRUCTIONS

PDFen ligne fr MANUEL D INSTRUCTIONS

lire attentivement cette notice originale tondeuse thermique tractee gl to 625eb 51 spm avant toute utilisation de cette machine la conserver pour des consultations futures num ro de s rie