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Open ElectivesOpen Electives Offered by the 18BOE-19BOE-20BOE-21SubjectLTPCreditsLaser Systems & ApplicationsNuclear ScienceOperations ResearchPrinciples of Remote SensingDisaster ManagementSolid Waste ManagementIntroduction to Data & File StructuresIntroduction to Web TechnologyLinux & Shell ProgrammingNon-Conventional Energy ResourcesFundamentals of Electric DrivesIndustrial Automation & RoboticsIndustrial ElectronicsElectronic Product DesignQuality ManagementReliability & Maintenance EngineeringIndustrial Pollution & ControlEntrepreneurship DevelopmentPrinciples of ManagementOrganisational Behaviour & YLLABIBOE-01LASER SYSTEMS & APPLICATIONSCourse categoryPre-requisite SubjectContact hours/weekNumber of CreditsCourse Assessmentmethods:::::Course Outcomes:Open Electives (OE), ASDNILLecture : 2, Tutorial : 1 , Practical: 03Continuous assessment through tutorials, attendance, homeassignments, quizzes and Three Minor tests and One Major TheoryExaminationThe students are expected to be able to demonstrate thefollowing knowledge, skills and attitudes after completing thiscourse1.Basic idea of quantum physics and concepts of wave particle duality used for theinterpretation of laser action.2.Experimental confirmation for laser optics and its applications.3.Essentials of laser action and different criterion for the production of laser lightoperating principle of different lasers its quality and output powers.4.Application of laser in research, medical, communication and industry.

Topics CoveredUNIT-IREVIEW OF QUANTUM MECHANICSDe Broglie concept of Matter wave, Particle and Group Velocities, ,Principle of Indeterminacy,Determination of the position of particle by microscope, Diffraction of a beam of electrons througha narrow slit, Physical Significance of ψ, Schrödinger wave equation.INTRODUCTION TO LASERSElectromagnetic spectrum, Waves and Radiation, Maser, Earlier Experiments with Radio Waves,Emergence of Laser Era, Pre-laser Optics, Laser Optics, Laser Today.UNIT-IIPRINCILES OF LASER ACTIONAbsorption and Emission of light, Spontaneous Emission, Stimulated Emission, Einstein Relation,Population Inversion Pumping ,Pumping Methods, Amplification and Gain, Action of Opticalcavity, Cavity Configurations, Stability criterion of the cavity, Cavity Modes, The quality factor,Manipulation of Laser beam, Mode locking, Cavity dumping, Laser Band width.ELEMENTS OF LASERBasic Elements of Laser Systems, Principle of Laser Action: Threshold condition, Condition forsteady state oscillation,Cavity Resonance Frequencies, Laser Operating Frequencies, Laser RateEquations, Two level laser system, Three level laser system, Four level laser system, Optimumoutput power.UNIT-IIILASER: OPTICAL PROPERTIESMonochromaticity, Coherence, Spatial Coherence, Temporal Coherence, Divergence andDirectionality, Relation between Coherence and Monochromaticity, Relation between size of thesource and coherence of the field.LASER SYSTEMS & TYPESClassifications of Lasers, Solid State Lasers: Ruby Laser, Nd YAG Laser, Gas Lasers: HeliumNeon Laser, Helium Cadmium (He-Cd) Laser, Carbon dioxide (CO2 ) Laser, Nitrogen (N2 ) Laser,,Excimer Laser, Diode Laser.UNIT-IVAPPLICATION of LASERSImportant applications of lasers in Materials Processing, Military, Medical Science, Holography,Optical Fiber Communication. Non Linear optics.6666Books & References1. Lasers: Fundamentals and Applications-K. Thyagrajan and Ajoy Ghatak, Mac Millan, PublishersIndia Ltd., New Delhi.2. Laser Principles, Types and Application - K.R. Nambiar, New Age International, New Delhi.3. Laser concepts and Applications - S.A. Ahmad, New Age International, New Delhi.BOE-02NUCLEAR SCIENCECourse categoryPre-requisite SubjectContact hours/weekNumber of CreditsCourse Assessmentmethods:::::Open Electives (OE), ASDNILLecture : 2, Tutorial : 1 , Practical: 03Continuous assessment through tutorials, attendance, homeassignments, quizzes and Three Minor tests and One MajorTheory Examination

:Course OutcomesThe students are expected to be able to demonstrate thefollowing knowledge, skills and attitudes after completing thiscourse1.Basic features and constituent of nucleons.2.Various kinds of nuclear models and nuclear reactions3.Processes involved in nuclear decay and various types of nuclear detectors4.Salient features of nuclear instrumentation and application of nuclear techniques.Topics CoveredUNIT-INucleus and Its Basic Features:Nuclear structure: The Proton-Neutron hypothesis and the nuclear forces, The magnetic andelectrical properties of the nucleus, nuclear stability, nuclear radius and its measurement, nuclearspin, measurement of nuclear magnetic moment, Nuclear magnetic resonance and its applications.UNIT-IINuclear Models:Single particle model, liquid drop model and semi-empirical mass formula, nuclear potential andshell model, collective model.Nuclear Reaction:Nuclear reactions and laws of conservation, types of nuclear reaction, mechanism of nuclearreaction, nuclear fission & binuclear fusion and their explanation by liquid drop model. Protonproton chain and CNO cycles in stars. Elementary particles, Cosmic rays.UNIT-IIINuclear Decay:Decay constant, half life period and mean life, alpha decay, beta decay, gamma decay, interactionof nuclear radiation with matter. Effect of nuclear radiation on human life.Nuclear Detectors: G M Counter, Scintillation counter, cloud chamber, Bubble Chamber,production and detection of neutrons and Gamma-photon.UNIT-IVNuclear Instrumentation:Mass spectrograph: General principle, Aston‘s Mass Spectrograph. Van de Graph Generator,Cyclotron, Synchrotron, X-rays production from Cyclotrons.Application of Nuclear Techniques: Positron emission topography, radiotracer techniques andapplications in material science and agriculture.6666Books & References1. Nuclear Physics by Irving Kaplan, Narosa Publishing House, 9 th Reprint, 1987, New Delhi, India.2. Nuclear Physics by Roy & Nigam, John Wiley & Sons, New Delhi.3. Concepts of Modern Physics by Arthur Beiser, McGraw-Hill, New Delhi.4. Introductory Nuclear Physics by Wang, PHI Learning, New Delhi.BOE-03OPERATIONS RESEARCHCourse categoryPre-requisite SubjectContact hours/weekNumber of CreditsCourse Assessment:::::Open Electives (OE), ASDNILLecture : 3, Tutorial : 1 , Practical: 04Continuous assessment through tutorials, attendance, home

assignments, quizzes and Three Minor tests and One Major TheoryExaminationThe students are expected to be able to demonstrate thefollowing knowledge, skills and attitudes after completing thiscoursemethodsCourse Outcomes:1. Identify and develop operational research models from the verbal description of the realsystem.2. Be able to build and solve Transportation Models and Assignment Models.3. Knowledge of formulating mathematical models for quantitative analysis of managerialproblems in industry4. Aware with the basic concepts and tools of game theory and can apply these tools to reallife situations.Topics CoveredUNIT-ILinear ProgrammingTwo variable linear programming model and Graphical method of solution, Simplex method, DualSimplex method, Special Cases of linear programming, Duality, Sensitivity Analysis, OR Model,solving the OR model.UNIT-IIUNIT-II: Transportation ProblemsTypes of transportation problems, Mathematical models, Transportation algorithms.Assignment: Allocation and assignment problems and models, Processing of jobs throughmachines.UNIT-IIINetwork TechniquesShortest path model minimum spanning tree problems, Max-Flow problem, Min-cut problem.Project Management: Phase of Project Management, guidelines of network construction, CPM andPERT.UNIT-IVGame Theory and Quality SystemsRectangular games, Minimax theorem, graphical solution of 2xn or mx2 games, game with mixedstrategies, reduction to linear programming model, Elements of Queuing model, generalizedPoisson Queuing model, Single Server model.9999Books & References1. R.K. Gupta: Operation Research; Krishna Prakashan Media (P) Ltd., Meerut.2. R. Panneer Shivam, ―Operation Research‖, PHI learning 2008.3. Hamdy H. Taha, ―Operation Research-An introduction‖, Pearson Education, 2003.4. V.K. Khanna, ―Total Quality Management‖, New Age International, 2008.BOE-04PRINCIPLES OF REMOTE SENSINGCourse categoryPre-requisite SubjectContact hours/weekNumber of CreditsCourse Assessment:::::Open Elective (OE), CEDNILLecture : 3, Tutorial : 1 , Practical: 04Continuous assessment through tutorials, assignments, quizzes

methodsCourse Outcomes:and Three Minor tests and One Major Theory & PracticalExaminationThe students are expected to be able to demonstrate thefollowing knowledge, skills and attitudes after completing thiscourse1.Understand the way in which electromagnetic radiation interacts with the earth‘satmosphere, the earth‘s surface and the remote sensing system.2.Develop some skills in image interpretation and analysis.3.Be familiar with different types of sensors and remote sensing space missions that areused to detect and record certain parts of the electromagnetic spectrum.4.Understand simple image enhancement , filtering operations over digital images5.Be able to carry out corrections of geometric distortions in digital images6.Be aware of some applications of remotely sensed images7.Develop a knowledge and understanding of spectral classification of images for featureextraction8.Understand the concepts and principles of global positioning system9.Understand the sources of errors in a GPS, and tackling them.Topics CoveredUNIT-IRemote sensing system and its components, Electromagnetic spectrum, definition of emissivity,reflectance, absorbance and transmittance. Spectral signature, atmospheric window, active andpassive remote sensing systems, Interaction of electromagnetic energy with atmosphere and earthfeatures, factors affecting the reflectance.UNIT-IIAirborne and space platforms, Advantages and disadvantages of each, principle and functioning ofmulti-spectral, thermal & line scanners, Multi concept of remote sensing, Different satellite andsensor combinations: LANDSAT, SPOT, IRS series of satellites and sensors. Their importantcharacteristics such as flight altitude, IFOV, spatial resolution, swath, spectral bands, andrepetivity.UNIT-IIIIntroduction to Digital Image Processing, digital image representation, and characterization,Concept of color, Color composites, histograms and scatter plot, image enhancement, contraststretching, radiometric processing including correction of atmospheric corrections; geometriccorrections, Image Transformations such as subtraction, rationing, NDVI and PCAUNIT-IVGround truth, Geographic and Radiometric, Principles of Global Positioning Systems and its role toremote sensing data, Digital terrain models. Thematic classification and clustering to includeunsupervised and supervised classification based on parallelepiped, minimum distance andmaximum likelihood classification; accuracy assessment of classification. Applications of remotesensing9999Textbooks1. Thomas Lillesand, Ralph W. Kiefer, Jonathan Chipman., Remote Sensing and ImageInterpretation. WileyReference books1. Curran, Paul J., Principles of Remote sensing Longman

2.3.4.5.Campbell, J.B., Introduction of Remote Sensing Taylor and Francis,Sabins, F.F., Remote Sensing: Principles and Interpretations Worth PublishersReddy, M. Anji, Remote sensing and Geographic Information System BS PublicationsB. Bhatta, Remote Sensing and GIS, Oxford University PressBOE-05DISASTER MANAGEMENTCourse categoryPre-requisite SubjectContact hours/weekNumber of CreditsCourse Assessmentmethods:::::Course Outcomes:Open Elective (OE), CEDNILLecture : 3, Tutorial : 1 , Practical: 04Continuous assessment through tutorials, attendance, homeassignments, quizzes and Three Minor tests and One Major TheoryExaminationThe students are expected to be able to demonstrate thefollowing knowledge, skills and attitudes after completing thiscourse1.Discuss the various modes of disaster arising in different areas2.Identify the roles of NDRF and SDRF in disaster management3.Illustrate the various trends of disaster management in Indian context4.Recommend the various disaster prevention techniques for different context5.Define the role of engineers in Disaster mitigationTopics CoveredUNIT-IType of disasters, Accent on land slides, earthquakes, flashflood, avalanches, snow blizzards.Causes, consequences and mitigation techniques, Flashfloods their management and relief,Contingency planning for dam failuresUNIT-IICharacteristics of glaciers and protection of important monuments from glacial flow, Managementof snow avalanche, Disaster management planning, Roles of NDRF and SDRF in DisasterManagementUNIT-IIILandslides, their classification, causes, & preventive measures. Concept, growth presents trendsstatus in India and concept of contingency planning and systems approach of disaster management.Sociology of disasters, Human and media response and role.UNIT-IVDisaster prevention techniques, Disaster legislation, Disaster prone area building codes,Vulnerability analysis, Health and sanitation aspects, Relief administration in India and role ofengineers in disaster mitigationTextbooks1. Disaster Management and Strategies - Ashu Pasricha, Kiyanoush Ghalav and Jai Narain SharmaReference books1. Disaster Management and Preparedness -Larry R. Collins, CRC Press.2. Disaster Management Handbook - Jack Pinkowski, CRC Press9999

BOE-06SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENTCourse categoryPre-requisite SubjectContact hours/weekNumber of CreditsCourse Assessmentmethods:::::Course Outcomes:Open Elective (OE), CEDNILLecture : 3, Tutorial : 1 , Practical: 04Continuous assessment through tutorials, attendance, homeassignments, quizzes and Three Minor tests and One Major TheoryExaminationThe students are expected to be able to demonstrate thefollowing knowledge, skills and attitudes after completing thiscourse1.Illustrate the waste generation in a technological society and analyze the wastegeneration trends.2.Discuss the essential elements for solid waste management.3.Propose a mathematical approach for handling waste on-site and off-site.4.Calculate the efficiencies of each collection system.5.Measure the actual volume of waste produced and reduced in terms of volumeestimation.6.Calculate the actual amount of energy that can be recovered from waste.7.Designing an engineered landfill for waste produced from society.8.Illustrate the chemical processes involved during degradation of waste in landfill.9.Categorizing the various design parameters to be fulfilled while adopting compostingprocess for waste treatment.10. Figure out the present situation of solid waste and its management.Topics CoveredUNIT-ISolid waste: Public health and ecological impacts. Sources and types of solid wastes, material flowand waste generation in a technological society, factors affecting the generation rates, futurechallenges and opportunities. Functional elements: Waste generation, storage collection, transferand transport, processing and recovery disposal.UNIT-IIPhysical and chemical composition of municipal solid waste, integrated solid waste management,hierarchy of waste management options. Storage: movable bins, fixed bins. Collection: home tohome collection, community bin system. Theory and design of hauled container system, stationarycontainer system.UNIT-IIITransportation: Different vehicles used and layout of routes. Engineering system for on-sitehandling and processing of solid waste. Waste reduction and segregation equipment and methods.Land filling: Site selection criteria, landfill layout, landfill sections. Occurrence of gases andleachate landfills, control of leachates and different phases.UNIT-IVComposting, types of composting, process description, design and operational consideration ofaerobic and anaerobic composting. Thermal technologies: Incineration and pyrolysis system,9999

energy recovery system. Electronic waste and Bio-Medical Waste. Overview of Solid wastemanagement practices in India.Textbooks1. Tchobanoglous, G., Theisen, H. & Vigil, S.A; Integrated Solid Waste Management: McGrawHill, New YorkReference books1. Tchobanoglous, G., Kreith, F; Handbook of solid waste management: McGraw Hill, New York2. Solid Waste Engineering, Principle & Management issues by VenTe Chow.3. Bhide, A.D., B.B. Sundaresan, Solid Waste Management in developing Countries.4. Manual on Municipal solid waste management, CPHEEO, Govt. of India.5. Guidelines for Management and Handling of Hazardous wastes MOEF(1991), Govt. of India.6. Datta, M; Waste Disposal in Engineered Landfills, Narosa Publishers, DelhiBOE-07INTRODUCTION TO DATA & FILE STRUCTURESCourse CategoryPre-requisite SubjectContact Hours/WeekNumber of CreditsCourse AssessmentMethods:::::Course Outcomes:Open Elective (OE), CSEDNILLecture : 2, Tutorial : 1 , Practical: 24Continuous assessment through tutorials, attendance, homeassignments, quizzes, practical work, record, viva voce andThree Minor tests and One Major Theory & PracticalExaminationThe students are expected to be able to demonstrate thefollowing knowledge, skills and attitudes after completing thiscourse1.Provide a solid introduction to the topic of file structure design.2.Discuss, in detail, the data structures necessary for achieving its efficiency objectives.3.Introducing techniques for organization and manipulation of data in secondary storageincluding the low level aspects of file manipulation which include basic file operations,secondary storage devices and system software.4.Introducing the most important high-level file structures tools which include indexing,consequential processing, B trees, Hashing.5.Applying the techniques in the design of C programs for solving various filemanagement problems.Topics CoveredUNIT-IIntroduction: Basic Terminology, Elementary Data Organization, Structure Operations, AlgorithmComplexity and Time-Space Trade-Off.Arrays: Array Definition Representation and Analysis, Single and Multidimensional Arrays,Address Calculation, Application of Arrays, Character String in C, Character String Operation,Array as Parameters, Ordered List, Sparse Matrices and Vectors.Stacks: Array Representation and Implementation of Stack, Operations on Stacks: Push & Pop,Array Representation of Stack, Linked Representation of Stack, Operations Associated withStacks, Application of Stack: Conversion of Infix to Prefix and Postfix Expressions, Evaluation of6

Postfix Expression using Stack, Applications of Recursion in Problems like ‗Tower of Hanoi‘.UNIT-IIQueues: Array and Linked Representation and Implementation of Queues, Operations on Queue:Create, Add, Delete, Full and Empty, Circular Queues, D-Queues and Priority Queues.Linked List: Representation and Implementation of Singly Linked Lists, Two-Way Header List,Traversing and Searching of Linked List, Overflow and Underflow, Insertion and Deletion to /from Linked Lists, Insertion and Deletion Algorithms, Doubly Linked List, Linked List in Array,Polynomial Representation and Addition, Generalized Linked List, Garbage Collection andCompaction.UNIT-IIITrees: Basic Terminology, Binary Trees, Binary Tree Representation, Algebraic Expressions,Complete Binary Tree, Extended Binary Trees, Array and Linked Representation of Binary Trees,Traversing Binary Trees, Threaded Binary Trees, Traversing Threaded Binary Trees, HuffmanAlgorithm.Graphs: Terminology & Representations, Graphs & Multi-Graphs, Directed Graphs, SequentialRepresentations of Graphs, Adjacency Matrices, Traversal, Connected Component and SpanningTrees, Minimum Cost Spanning Trees.UNIT-IVFile Structures: A Model for External Storage Organization, Hashed Files, Indexed Files, BTrees, Files with Dense Index, Files with Variable Length Records, Data Structures for Lookup onNon-Key Fields, Partial Match Retrieval, Data Structures for Range Queries.666EXPERIMENTSWrite Program in C or C for following.1. Array implementation of Stack, Queue, Circular Queue, List.2. Implementation of Stack, Queue, Circular Queue, List using Dynamic memory Allocation.3. Implementation of Tree Structures, Binary Tree, Tree Traversal, Binary Search Tree,Insertion and Deletion in BST.4. Graph Implementation, BFS, DFS, Min. cost spanning tree, shortest path algorithm.Textbooks1. Aaron M. Tenenbaum, Yedidyah Langsam and Moshe J. Augenstein Data Structures Using C andC , PHI.2. Horowitz and Sahani, Fundamentals of Data Structures, Galgotia Publication.3. G A V Pai, Data Structures and Algorithms, TMHReference books1. Jean Paul Trembley and Paul G. Sorenson, An Introduction to Data Structures with applications,McGraw Hill.2. R. Kruse et al, Data Structures and Program Design in C, Pearson Education3. Lipschutz, Data Structures‖ Schaum‘s Outline Series, TMHBOE-08INTRODUCTION TO WEB TECHNOLOGYCourse CategoryPre-requisite SubjectContact Hours/WeekNumber of CreditsCourse AssessmentMethods:::::Open Elective (OE), CSEDNILLecture : 2, Tutorial : 1 , Practical: 24Continuous assessment through tutorials, attendance, homeassignments, quizzes, practical work, record, viva voce andThree Minor tests and One Major Theory & PracticalExamination

Course Outcomes: The students are expected to be able to demonstrate thefollowing knowledge, skills and attitudes after completing thiscourse1.Identify common design mistakes when creating a web based application.2.Develop the concept of web algorithm.3.Discuss the process of editing a web page using text editors and web page editors.4.Cover commonly used HTML tags and how this knowledge is important to a webdesigner.5.Demonstrate an understanding of basic CSS, XML.6.Develop the concept of web publishingTopics CoveredUNIT-IIntroduction-Introduction to Web, Protocols Governing the Web, Web Development Strategies,Web ApplicationsUNIT-IIWeb Algorithms-The World Wide Web, WWW Architecture, Web Search Engines, WebCrawling, Web Indexing, Web Searching, Search Engines Optimization and Limitations, WebMining: Web Content Mining, Web Structure Mining, Web Usage Mining.UNIT-IIIMarkup language basics: HTML: Designing Web Pages with HTML-Use of Tags, Hyperlinks,URLs, Tables, Text Formatting, Graphics & Multimedia, Imagemap, Frames and Forms in WebPages. CSS: Use of Cascading Style Sheet in Web Pages. XML: Extensible Markup Language(XML): Introduction-Using User-Defined Tags in Web Pages, Displaying XML Contents, XMLDtds, Use of XSLUNIT-IVWeb Publishing or Hosting- Creating the Website, Saving the Site, working on the Web Site,Creating Website Structure, Creating Titles for Web Pages, Themes-Publishing Web Sites.6666EXPERIMENTS1. Create a HTML static web page which shows the use of different tags in that.2. Insert an image and create a link such that clicking on image takes user to other page.3. Prepare a sample code to illustrate three types of lists in HTML.4. Use tables to provide layout to your HTML page describing your university infrastructure.5. Use frames such that page is divided into 3 frames 20% on left to show contents of pages, 60% incenter to show body of page, remaining on right to show remarks.6. Create a simple form that will show all the INPUT METHODS available in HTML.7. Create a sample code to illustrate the Embedded, External and Inline style sheets for your webpage.8. Write an XML example of given tree that demonstrates the creation of user-designed tags anddisplay it in a browser. fname, lname, joindate, bdate, college, employee, age, salary (with at least3 elements) .9. Write a program in XML for creation of DTD which specifies a particular set of rules.Textbooks1. Web Technologies, 1/e -Uttam K. Roy ,Oxford University Press, USA2.Murray, Tom, Lynchburg, Creating a Web Page and Web Site ,College,20023.Haralambos Marmanis and Dmitry Babenko, Algorithms of the Intelligent Web-, May 2009, 368

pages, B&W4. Kogent Learning Solutions Inc. HTML 5 in simple steps Dreamtech PressReference books1. Steven M. Schafer HTML, XHTML, and CSS Bible, 5ed ,Wiley India2.Kogent Learning Web Technologies: HTML, JAVAscript , WileyBOE-09LINUX & SHELL PROGRAMMINGCourse CategoryPre-requisite SubjectContact Hours/WeekNumber of CreditsCourse AssessmentMethods:::::Course Outcomes:Open Elective (OE), CSEDNILLecture : 2, Tutorial : 1 , Practical: 24Continuous assessment through tutorials, attendance, homeassignments, quizzes, practical work, record, viva voce andThree Minor tests and One Major Theory & PracticalExaminationThe students are expected to be able to demonstrate thefollowing knowledge, skills and attitudes after completing thiscourse1. Understand the fundamental concept related to kernel and shell2. Use the general commands of LINUX3. Understand the programming constructs to be used in shell programming4. write shell programs related to various programming problemsTopics CoveredUNIT-IHistory of Unix and Linux, Architecture of Linux, Advantages of Linux Introduction to Kernel,Introduction to Linux Shell: Types of Shell, Feature and Benefits of Shell, General LinuxUtilities/Commands, Vi Text Editor, Operation Modes and Related Commands/OptionsUNIT-IIShell Meta Characters, I/O Redirection and Piping, Pipes, Filters, Introduction to Linux Files:Rules for Creating Files, File: Concept, Types, Permissions, File related Commands, Linux FilesSystem Process: Concept, Types, Related CommandsUNIT-IIIConcept of Inode. Chown, chgrp: Changing File Ownership, Links: Hard & Soft, Shell Script:Concept, Making Script Interactive with Read and Positional Parameters, Exit Status ofCommands, Computation with Expr, Relational, Arithmetic, Logical Operators and their Usage,Various Programming Constructs Like while, for, if, case, until Etc., Shell Script Writing forDifferent Type of ProblemsUNIT-IVRoot Account, Linux Group, Password & Shadow File Formats, Creating User Accounts in Linux,Changing Password, deleting user, Backup using tar and cpio, Various Administration Issues,administration related Commands with Syntax and Usage6666

EXPERIMENTS1. Practice of commands related to regular files and directories2. Practice of commands related to setting of file and directory permissions3. Writing of minimum three shell scripts based on numeric inputs for problems like armstrongnumbers, prime numbers, mathematical series and other related concepts4. Writing of minimum three shell scripts based on string inputs for problems like stringconcatenation, palindrome words, change case of string characters and other related concepts5. Writing of minimum two shell scripts for problems based on array concept.Textbooks1. Graham Glass and King Ables, Unix for Programmers & Users, Pearson Education2. Sumitabha Das, Unix Concepts & Applications (includes SCO Unix & Linux, Tata McGraw HillEducationReference books1. Ellen Siever, Robert Love and Arnold Robbins, Linux in Nutshell, Fifth Edition, Oreilly Media.2.3.Kurt Wall, Mark Watson, Mark Whitis, Linux Programming, Third Edition, SAMS Techmedia.Mark Sobell, Practical Guide to Linux Programming, Pearson Education.BOE- 10NON-CONVENTIONAL ENERGY RESOURCESCourse categoryPre-requisite SubjectContact hours/weekNumber of CreditsCourse Assessmentmethods:::::Course Outcomes:Open Elective (OE), EEDNILLecture : 2, Tutorial : 1 , Practical: 03Continuous assessment through tutorials, attendance, homeassignments, quizzes and Three Minor tests and One MajorTheory ExaminationThe students are expected to be able to demonstrate thefollowing knowledge, skills and attitudes after completing thiscourse1.Various non-conventional energy resources.2.The concept of Solar Thermal Energy.3.The concept of Geothermal Energy & Wind Energy Generation.Topics CoveredUNIT-IIntroductionVarious non-conventional energy resources- Introduction, availability, classification, relative meritsand demerits.Solar Cells: Theory of solar cells. solar cell materials, solar cell array, solar cell power plant,limitations.Bio-mass: Availability of bio-mass and its conversion theory.UNIT-IISolar Thermal Energy:Solar radiation, flat plate collectors and their materials, applications and performance, focusing ofcollectors and their materials, applications and performance; solar thermal power plants, thermalenergy storage for solar heating and cooling, limitations.Thermo-electrical and thermionic Conversions: Principle of working, performance andlimitations.66

UNIT-IIIGeothermal Energy:Resources of geothermal energy, thermodynamics of geo-thermal energy conversion-electricalconversion, non-electrical conversion, environmental considerations.Magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD): Principle of working of MHD Power plant, performance andlimitations.Fuel Cells: Principle of working of various types of fuel cells and their working, performance andlimitations.UNIT-IVWind Energy:Wind power and its sources, site selection, criterion, momentum theory, classification of rotors,concentrations and augments, wind characteristics. performance and limitations of energyconversion systems.Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC): Availability, theory and working principle,performance and limitations.Wave and Tidal Wave: Principle of working, performance and limitations. Waste RecyclingPlants.66Text Books & References1. Raja et. al, ―Introduction to Non-Conventional Energy Resources‖ Scitech Publications.2. John Twideu and Tony Weir, ―Renewal Energy Resources‖ BSP Publications, 2006.3. M.V.R. Koteswara Rao, ―Energy Resources: Conventional & Non-Conventional‖ BSPPublications, 2006.4. D.S. Chauhan, ―Non-conventional Energy Resources‖ New Age International.5. C.S. Solanki, ―Renewal Energy Technologies: A Practical Guide for Beginners‖ PHI Learning.6. Peter Auer, ―Advances in Energy System and Technology". Vol. 1 & II

CED BOE-04 Principles of Remote Sensing 3 1 0 4 5. CED BOE-05 Disaster Management 3 1 0 4 . MED BOE-17 Reliability & Maintenance Engineering 2 1 0 3 17. MED BOE-18 Industrial Pollution & Control 2 1 0 3 18. MBA BOE-19 Entrepreneurship Development 2 1 0 3 . Characteristics of glaciers and protection of important monuments from glacial flow .

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