Supply Chain Energy Efficiency Through ISO 50001

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Supply ChainEnergy Efficiencythrough ISO 50001 :A How-to Guidefor Your CompanyMay 2019Commission for Environmental Cooperation

PLEASE CITE AS:CEC. 2019. Supply Chain Energy Efficiency through ISO 50001: A How-to Guide for YourCompany. Montreal, Canada: Commission for Environmental Cooperation. 54 pp.This publication was prepared by Joe A. Almaguer for the Secretariat of theCommission for Environmental Cooperation. The information contained herein isthe responsibility of the author and does not necessarily reflect the views of thegovernments of Canada, Mexico or the United States of America.ABOUT THE AUTHOR:Joe A. Almaguer brings corporate energy management expertise and experienceas a retired Global Energy Efficiency and Conservation Leader for the Dow Chemical Company. His ISO 50001 expertise informs this work from his participationas an Industry Expert on the US Mirror Committee to the ISO Technical Committee242 during the Standard development.Reproduction of this document in whole or in part and in any form for educationalor non-profit purposes may be made without special permission from the CECSecretariat, provided acknowledgment of the source is made. The CEC wouldappreciate receiving a copy of any publication or material that uses this documentas a source.Except where otherwise noted, this work is protected under a Creative CommonsAttribution Noncommercial-NoDerivative Works License. Commission for Environmental Cooperation, 2019ISBN:978-2-89700-269-5 – English version978-2-89700-270-1 – French version978-2-89700-271-8 – Spanish versionLegal deposit – Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec, 2019Legal deposit – Library and Archives Canada, 2019PUBLICATION DETAILSFOR MORE INFORMATIONDocument category: Project publicationCommission for Environmental CooperationPublication date: May 2019700 de la Gauchetière St. West, Suite 1620Original language: EnglishMontreal (Québec)Review and quality assurance procedures:H3B 5M2 CanadaFinal Party review: May 2019QA341Project: Operational Plan 2017–2018 / Increasing Industrial EnergyEfficiency through ISO 50001t 514.350.4300 f 514.350.4314info@cec.org / www.cec.org

TABLE OF CONTENTSAbstract .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Executive Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71. Importance of Energy Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101.1 Ad hoc Approach to Energy Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111.2 Management Systems Approach to Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122. The Case for ISO 50001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .143. Strategy for the Adoption of and Conformance to ISO 50001 Energy Management System . . . 163.1 Elevating Energy and GHG Sustainability as a Priority. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.1.1 Overcome Organizational Lack of Awareness and Apathy on Energy Management.17173.1.2 Build the Value Proposition for Energy Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183.1.3 Organizations with Small Energy/GHG Footprints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193.2 Reinforcing Existing Corporate Energy and GHG Values with ISO 50001 . . . . . . . . . . . . 204. Supply Chain Engagement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 225. Implementation Approach. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245.1 Structure and Curriculum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255.1.1 Organizing the Implementation Teams5.1.2 Participant Preparation Phase. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265.1.3 Training and Implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275.2 Training Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295.3 Trainer Qualifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .296. Supporting Tools and Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306.1 50001 Ready Navigator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306.1.2 Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 316.1.3 How to Get Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 346.2 Energy Footprint Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .346.2.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 346.2.2 Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .356.2.3 Data Gathering Needs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 356.2.4 Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .366.2.5 How to Get Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36Supply Chain Energy Efficiency through ISO 50001: A How-to Guide for Your Company1

6.3 Energy Performance Indicator (EnPI) Lite Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 376.3.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 376.3.2 Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 376.3.3 Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 386.3.4 EnPI Lite Results for 50001 Ready . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 386.3.5 Beyond EnPI Lite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .387. ISO 50001 Case Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407.2 ArcelorMittal Cleveland: 50001 Ready Facility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 417.3 Nissan North America: Three 50001 Ready and SEP-Certified Facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . 427.4 General Motors de México SLP: ISO 50001-Certified Facility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .437.5 Ingersoll Rand Manufactura S. de R.L. de C.V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 447.6 Hilton: Portfolio-wide ISO 50001 Certification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 457.7 The 3M Company: Enterprise-wide ISO 50001 and SEP Certification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 467.7.1 Central Function, Enterprise-wide Approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 467.7.2 Cost Reduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.7.3 Lessons Learned . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Appendix A: List of Key Resources .Bibliography .4848. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52LIST OF TABLESTABLE 1. Training description and suggested timeline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28TABLE 2. List of tasks in the 50001 Ready Navigator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32TABLE 3. Metrics from ISO 50001 implementation at General Motors de México SLP . . . . . . .43TABLE 4. Metrics from ISO 50001 implementation at Ingersoll Rand Manufactura S. de R.L. de C.V 44TABLE 5. Metrics from ISO 50001 implementation across Hilton’s global portfolio . . . . . . . . . . 45TABLE 6. Summary of enterprise-wide savings at 3M . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47TABLE 7. Links to key ISO 50001 resources referenced to in this document . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 502

LIST OF FIGURESFIGURE 1. Energy performance improvements greater with ISO 50001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15FIGURE 2. Structure of implementation teams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26FIGURE 3. EnMS functions of 3M central function and 3M sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMSCDPCarbon Disclosure ProjectCECCommission for Environmental CooperationCO2carbon dioxideConueeComisión Nacional para el Uso Eficiente de la EnergíaCP EnMSCertified Practitioner in EnMSDJSIDow Jones Sustainability IndicesEnPIenergy performance indicatorEnMSenergy management systemGJgigajouleISOInternational Organization of StandardizationNRCanNatural Resources CanadaOEMoriginal equipment manufacturerSEnPISuperior Energy Performance 50001 Energy Performance IndicatorSEP 50001Superior Energy Performance 50001SEUsignificant energy useUS DOEUnited States Department of EnergySupply Chain Energy Efficiency through ISO 50001: A How-to Guide for Your Company3

ABSTRACTThis guide is intended to guide original equipment manufacturers (OEM) andsupplier organizations in establishing and institutionalizing the organizationalstructures and management systems needed to effectively and efficiently achievetheir desired energy performance goals and objectives. Central to this approach isthe recognition that the ISO 50001 Energy Management System is internationallyrecognized as the best vehicle to drive continual improvement in energy performance and achieve long-term results. As such, energy end-user organizationsand their supply chains are provided with the necessary information, strategies,and access to detailed training and tools to successfully implement ISO 50001.Appendix A compiles the links to the key resources referenced throughout thisdocument.EXECUTIVE SUMMARYThis guide is offered to organizations desiring to pursue and/or optimize energyperformance improvement. Some organizations employ an “ad hoc” approachto energy efficiency that may produce short-term improvements, but may not beeffective or sustained because the organization’s top leadership is not activelyinvolved in establishing or supporting improvement efforts. Instead, the “management systems” approach to energy efficiency is much more effective becausethe top leadership establishes and formalizes both the improvement objectivesand the means by which to achieve them. This document highlights ISO 50001 asthe framework for a comprehensive, systematic approach to energy management,initially within the boundaries of the organization, followed by a logical andnatural expansion of the supply chain. Complementary tools and training supportimplementation and outline a proven, comprehensive system for achievingcontinual and sustained energy improvement.This document identifies barriers to effective energy management and optimizingenergy performance and discusses strategies to overcome them. Top management’s role is shown to be critical to the development and sustainability of asuccessful energy management system (EnMS). Points reinforcing the businesscase for improved energy performance are provided to help organizationsovercome a lack of awareness or the belief that their energy footprint may betoo small to justify the economics of even minimal efforts. Additionally, broadbased participation from relevant departments—including marketing and sales,environmental and sustainability, investor relations, and customer support—canhelp the organization more fully realize not only the potential monetary value,but also the strategic value from offering of low carbon, low–energy-brandedproducts and services, enhanced company reputation, and positive sustainabilityindex recognition. This document also highlights case studies of companies thatachieved business benefits from ISO 50001 and their strategies for success. Theirexamples can provide insights into the benefits and methods of implementingISO 50001.4

An effective, step-by-step implementation approach blends astaff training program and the application of specific ISO 50001ACKNOWLEDGMENTStools and resources. Organizations are encouraged to utilize50001 EnMS Qualified Instructors, who are professional trainersThis report was prepared by Joe A. Almaguer, who developed theon ISO 50001 implementation methodologies, to educate, coachrecommendations and strategies for adopting ISO 50001 withand guide the organization to successful implementation. Theinput from several companies, including Fiat Chrysler, IBM, Newtraining leverages web-based software tools specifically focusedGold Mining, Cummins, Nissan North America, and Schneideron ISO 50001, including the 50001 Ready Navigator, whichElectric. The training approach in this document is informedprovides step-by-step guidance on all aspects of the ISO 50001by Bill Meffert and Holly Grell-Lawe of the Georgia Institute ofimplementation process, as well as other supporting tools.Technology, who design and deliver ISO 50001 and energy-re-Recognition from national energy agencies can provide motivation to pursue energy efficiency efforts. This training culminatesin preparing the organization to self-attest conformance toISO 50001 and receive recognition through the 50001 Readyprogram. The US Department of Energy (US DOE) developed50001 Ready to recognize organizations that establish an energymanagement system, measure and improve energy performanceover time, and self-attest to the structure of ISO 50001. TheComisión Nacional para el Uso Eficiente de la Energía (Conuee)of Mexico and Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) are in thelated trainings. Pamela de los Reyes of Energetics providedprogrammatic input, under contract with Lawrence BerkeleyNational Laboratory, and in coordination with Paul Scheihing ofthe United States Department of Energy. It was developed by theCEC Secretariat under the supervision of David Donaldson andCatherine Hallmich, as part of the Increasing Industrial EnergyEfficiency through ISO 50001 project, and with the guidanceof the Comisión Nacional para el Uso Eficiente de la Energíaof Mexico, Natural Resources Canada, and the United StatesDepartment of Energy.process of adapting 50001 Ready to their national recognitionprograms. Achievement of 50001 Ready prepares organizationsto take further, optional steps in energy management, whichcould include third-party certification to ISO 50001. Moreadvanced energy management systems could pursue SuperiorEnergy Performance 50001 (SEP 50001), US DOE’s certificationprogram with a higher focus on measurement and verification.This guideis offered toorganizationsdesiring topursue and/oroptimizeenergyperformanceimprovement.Supply Chain Energy Efficiency through ISO 50001: A How-to Guide for Your Company5

INTRODUCTIONToday, more than at any other time, business and social norms require us, as weconsume natural resources and have the potential to negatively impact the environment, to conduct our business affairs in a responsible and sustainable manner. Thatis, in our manufacturing, construction, transportation, and service activities, we mustintentionally and diligently endeavor to reduce both our resource consumption andpotential harm to the environment. The vast majority of midsize to large organizationshave now embraced sustainability principles and have incorporated them into theirbusiness models. As a result, many have developed and publicized their own sustainability goals to demonstrate their support for these principles and to incentivizepositive behaviors internally. Efforts aimed at minimizing fuel consumption and thecorresponding release of carbon dioxide gases are commonly referred to as Energyand Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Sustainability Goals. In response to these recent trends,an extensive array of technologies, strategies, methods, tools, best practices, andmanagement systems have been developed to help organizations meet or exceed theirsustainability objectives. Energy Management, therefore, can also be understood asan organization’s active pursuit of energy and GHG sustainability goals through theapplication of these tools and methods in order to reduce GHG emissions. These aids,for the most part, have been developed collaboratively by governmental energy andenvironmental agencies, end-user groups, nongovernmental organizations, universities, and standards groups and committees: all in an effort to make advancementsin this area for the common good. In this spirit and for this purpose, this guide hasbeen developed and is offered to organizations desiring to pursue and/or optimizeenergy performance improvement. Here, we will highlight ISO 50001 as the centerpiece of a comprehensive approach to energy management within the boundaries ofthe organization, and then the logical and natural expansion to their supply chain.We will also describe the coordinated use of other complementary tools and trainingthat together outline a proven, comprehensive system for achieving continual andsustained improvement.Supply Chain Energy Efficiency through ISO 50001: A How-to Guide for Your Company7

We will begin the discussion by first doing a bit of level-setting,establishing a common understanding of some of the conceptsand terms used both in ISO 50001 and also in today’s energydiscussions. Energy Performance – This is a general term used to describeresults or outcomes against a variety of energy metrics,including energy efficiency, energy consumption, energyconservation, etc. It is often used as the umbrella term todescribe or discuss the overall state, or change in state, of anorganization’s energy use over a given time period. The termcan also be used, and often is, to describe specific resultsagainst a particular referenced energy performance indicator(EnPI). For example: gigajoules (GJ)-in/GJ-out, GJ/day, GJs/unit,GJ/lb, GJ/km or % change in consumed GJs, etc. Energy Management – This refers to an organization’s collective efforts in establishing and pursuing energy performanceimprovement goals and objectives. Energy Management System – This refers to a formal, comprehensive approach to drive energy performance improvement. Itmakes use of policies, procedures, and established rules andconventions to guide and direct the entire organization. Energy Footprint – The energy footprint is primarily used indescribing the magnitude and nature of energy consumptionover a fixed period of time, usually a year. It can havedifferent energy components, such as fossil, renewable,or fuel from raw materials. Energy Efficiency – The term most often associated withthe measurement of energy input against a desired output.In energy performance improvement activities, it is used toindicate lowering energy consumption while achieving thedesired output or outcomes. The simple example being avehicle traveling the same distance from A to B under identicalroad conditions, but consuming less fuel, or a manufacturingsystem producing the identical product as another system, butusing less energy to produce it. Improved efficiency is usuallyassociated with making changes to the design of the system,restoring it to its initial design, maintaining it, or changing themanner in which it is operated.8 Energy Conservation – This term refers to the activities aimedat reducing energy consumption by reducing or doing withoutcertain outputs or outcomes. A few simple examples of energyconservation include turning off lights, raising/lowering thecontrol setting on thermostats, reducing the number of tripsor travel miles, or even reducing or eliminating low marginproducts from the production wheel. In all these cases, energyconsumption was avoided or saved by reducing or eliminatingthat which the system was designed to produce and thereforedoing without that output. Carbon Footprint – The carbon footprint is primarily usedto describe the amount of carbon dioxide and other carboncompounds emitted by an organization during a fixed periodof time, usually one year. Although carbon emissions canresult from other activities, our focus here is on those due tothe consumption of fossil fuels. The 2004 Greenhouse GasProtocol—A Corporate Accounting and Reporting Standard,Revised Edition classifies a company’s GHG emissions intothree “scopes” as follows: ظظ Scope 1 emissions are direct emissions from owned orcontrolled sources. ظظ Scope 2 emissions are indirect emissions from thegeneration of purchased energy. ظظ Scope 3 emissions are all indirect emissions (notincluded in scope 2) that occur in the value chain ofthe reporting company, including both upstream anddownstream emissions (WRI and WBCSD 2004). Product life cycle emissions – “All the emissions associatedwith the production and use of a specific product, from cradleto grave, including emissions from raw materials, manufacture, transport, storage, sale, use and disposal” (WRI andWBCSD 2011).

Supply Chain Energy Efficiency through ISO 50001: A How-to Guide for Your Company9

1IMPORTANCE OF ENERGYMANAGEMENTCompanies or organizations that desire to effect an improvement intheir energy and GHG performance will engage in energy managementin one form or another. Energy management is a means to an end: thatof pursuing an organization’s energy and GHG goals and objectives.Positive results, and particularly long-term results, depend entirely onthe effectiveness of the organization’s approach. Typically an organization will use one of two types of approaches to energy management: Thefirst might be called the “ad hoc” approach, in which the organization’stop leadership is not actively involved in establishing or supporting thespecific means by which to pursue or achieve improved energy performance. The second is the “management systems” approach, in whichthe top leadership establishes and formalizes both the improvementobjectives and the means by which to achieve them. Even a cursoryoverview of these two approaches reveals the vast superiority of themanagement systems approach.Energy management refers to anorganization’s effort in establishingand pursuing energy performanceimprovement goals and objectives.

1.1 Ad hoc Approach to Energy ManagementAn ad hoc approach refers to a bottom-up effort in which energy management largely depends onthe initiative of one or a few individuals, growing somewhat organically from there. It typically lacksthe support of organizational structures or policies traceable to the corporate or home office. Thereis usually no formal directive or mandate prioritizing energy performance improvements on a broadorganizational basis. Rather, it is the work of a few individuals and there is no official managementrequirement for active employee participation. Efforts tend to consist of individual or discreteimprovement projects, usually involving modification or replacement of equipment.Disadvantages of an ad hoc approach include the following: Because this approach relies so heavily on the enthusiasm, expertise, and commitment ofindividuals to drive and sustain the effort, the effort itself is only as strong as the commitment ofits proponents. Furthermore, the retirement, reassignment, relocation or reprioritization of certainemployees can spell the untimely demise of an energy management initiative. Without the support of formal policies, procedures, or established requirements traceable to ahigher-level authority, the effort becomes ineffective in providing a clear and sustained call toaction. Activity is limited to the sphere of influence of individual proponents. It therefore precludesa more comprehensive approach involving the various functions and work processes across theorganization, engaging only a relatively small segment of the available employee population. Withno formal budget to support the necessary roles and responsibilities, opting out becomes thedefault position for individuals or entire departments. The approach also fails to provide neededadministrative structures and work processes that enable continual improvement. The informal, and often localized, nature of the approach suffers from a lack of consistency acrossfacilities, locations, and organizational functions. The lack of consistency ultimately makes thisapproach inefficient and ineffective, resulting in: ظظ widely varying levels of commitment to the effort; ظظ inconsistent application of measurement, tracking, and reporting rules, resulting in poorquality energy data and information; ظظ missed improvement opportunities due to inconsistent use of leveraging or sharingmechanisms; ظظ ineffective project funding schemes due to inconsistent application of valuation protocols; and ظظ poor use of available improvement best practices. The approach is susceptible to the “on-again, off-again” syndrome as its priority becomes linkedto energy price fluctuations, with a high priority when prices are high, and low priority at times oflow energy prices.Ultimately, gains in energy performance are much harder to achieve and sustain because thisapproach does not produce a cohesive, comprehensive effort. Activities are ad hoc and not integrated into the organization’s primary work processes where managing energy is a natural extensionof daily work activity throughout the organization, not merely the oft-disjointed work of a few individuals. Under the ad hoc approach, the improvement effort becomes a constant struggle for resourcesand priority.Supply Chain Energy Efficiency through ISO 50001: A How-to Guide for Your Company11

1.2 Management Systems Approachto EnergyA management systems approach is one in which top management establishesand endorses a formal, comprehensive approach to drive energy performanceimprovement. Unlike the ad hoc approach, this approach makes use of policies,procedures, and established rules and conventions to guide and direct theentire organization. It formalizes supporting organizational structures, roles andresponsibilities, minimum requirements and funding mechanisms to sustain thework. Through these documented sets of requirements, methods, protocols andorganizational structures, improvement opportunities can be identified, prioritized and pursued in a systematic manner. Energy performance improvement canbe built into the company’s strategic business plans, the procurement process,engineering and design requirements, and day-to-day operational control andmaintenance of facilities and equipment. Through a comprehensive, well-established, well-integrated energy management system, an organization’s energysustainability goals and objectives can be achieved efficiently and effectively.Advantages of a management systems approach to energy include the following: It provides a systematic and logical approach traceable to high-level goalsand objectives. Similar to environmental health and safety requirements, energy managementrequirements are integrated into the primary work process of an organization,becoming a natural part of individuals’ job duties. Requirements and expectations are made clear and consistent across theorganization.Employees within the organizational functions and departmentsunderstand and have established work processes by which to perform theirrequired activities. Roles and responsibilities are established, avoiding redundancy, responsibilitygaps, and confusion. It provides the means for broad-based participation, expanding opportunityidentification and multiplying results.12

Through a comprehensive,well-established, wellintegrated energymanagement system,an organization’s energysustainability goals andobjectives can be achievedefficiently and effectively.Supply Chain Energy Efficiency thr

on ISO 50001, including the 50001 Ready Navigator, which provides step-by-step guidance on all aspects of the ISO 50001 implementation process, as well as other supporting tools. Recognition from national energy agencies can provide motiva-tion to p

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SUPPLY CHAIN RISK MANAGEMENT 2020. PAT TARVER - CPIM,CSCP,CLTD. BUILDING RESILIENCE TO PREVENT SUPPLY CHAIN DISRUPTION . MARCH 6, 2020. Michelle Wright - CSCP. APICS North Texas Chapter. . Preparing for Supply Chain Disruption with RESILIENCE! Closing .