2019 Physics National 5 Finalised Marking Instructions

3y ago
44 Views
2 Downloads
682.39 KB
24 Pages
Last View : Today
Last Download : 5m ago
Upload by : Camryn Boren
Transcription

NationalQualifications20192019 PhysicsNational 5Finalised Marking Instructions Scottish Qualifications Authority 2019These marking instructions have been prepared by examination teams for use by SQA appointedmarkers when marking external course assessments.The information in this document may be reproduced in support of SQA qualifications only on a noncommercial basis. If it is reproduced, SQA must be clearly acknowledged as the source. If it is to bereproduced for any other purpose, written permission must be obtained from permission@sqa.org.uk.

General marking principles for National 5 PhysicsThis information is provided to help you understand the general principles you must apply whenmarking candidate responses to questions in this paper. These principles must be read in conjunctionwith the detailed marking instructions, which identify the key features required in candidateresponses.(a)Marks for each candidate response must always be assigned in line with these markingprinciples, the Physics: general marking principles (GMPs)(http://www.sqa.org.uk/files ccc/Physicsgeneralmarkingprinciples.pdf) and the detailedmarking instructions for this assessment.(b)Marking should always be positive. This means that, for each candidate response, marks areaccumulated for the demonstration of relevant skills, knowledge and understanding: they arenot deducted from a maximum on the basis of errors or omissions.(c)If a specific candidate response does not seem to be covered by either the principles or detailedmarking instructions, and you are uncertain how to assess it, you must seek guidance from yourteam leader.(d)Where a wrong answer to part of a question is carried forward and the wrong answer is thenused correctly in the following part, give the candidate credit for the subsequent part or‘follow-on’. (GMP 17)(e)Award marks for non-standard symbols where the symbols are defined and the relationship iscorrect, or where the substitution shows that the relationship used is correct. This must be clearand unambiguous. (GMP 22)(f)Award full marks for a correct final answer (including units if required) on its own, unless anumerical question specifically requires evidence of working to be shown, eg in a ‘show’question. (GMP 1)(g)Give credit where a diagram or sketch conveys correctly the response required by the question.It will usually require clear and correct labels (or the use of standard symbols). (GMP 19)(h)Marks are allocated for knowledge of relevant formulae alone. Do not award a mark when acandidate writes down several formulae and does not select the correct one to continue with,for example by substituting values. (GMP 3)(i)Do not award marks if a ‘magic triangle’, eg ,is the only statement in a candidate’sresponse. To gain the mark, the correct relationship must be stated eg V IR or R (GMP 6)(k)V , etc.IIn rounding to an expected number of significant figures, award the mark for correct answerswhich have up to two figures more or one figure less than the number in the data with thefewest significant figures. (GMP 10)(Note: the use of a recurrence dot, eg 0 6 , would imply an infinite number of significantfigures and would therefore not be acceptable.)page 02

(l)The incorrect spelling of technical terms should usually be ignored and candidates should beawarded the relevant mark, provided that answers can be interpreted and understood withoutany doubt as to the meaning.Where there is ambiguity, do not award the mark. Two specific examples of this would be whenthe candidate uses a term: that might be interpreted as reflection, refraction or diffraction, eg ‘defraction’ that might be interpreted as either fission or fusion, eg ‘fussion’The spelling of these words is similar, but the words have totally different meanings. If thespelling (or handwriting) in an answer makes it difficult for you to interpret a candidate’sintention, then do not award the mark. (GMP 25)(m)Marks are awarded only for a valid response to the question asked. For example, in response toquestions that ask candidates to: identify, name, give, or state, they need only name or present in brief form. describe, they must provide a statement or structure of characteristics and/or features.explain, they must relate cause and effect and/or make relationships between things clear. determine or calculate, they must determine a number from given facts, figures orinformation.estimate, they must determine an approximate value for something.justify, they must give reasons to support their suggestions or conclusions, eg this might beby identifying an appropriate relationship and the effect of changing variables.show that, they must use physics (and mathematics) to prove something, eg a given value.All steps, including the stated answer, must be shownpredict, they must suggest what may happen based on available information.suggest, they must apply their knowledge and understanding of physics to a new situation. Anumber of responses are acceptable: marks will be awarded for any suggestions that aresupported by knowledge and understanding of physics.use your knowledge of physics or aspect of physics to comment on, they must apply theirskills, knowledge and understanding to respond appropriately to the problem/situationpresented, for example by making a statement of principle(s) involved and/or a relationshipor equation, and applying these to respond to the problem/situation. They will gain creditfor the breadth and/or depth of their conceptual understanding. page 03

Common issues with candidate responsesWhen marking National 5 Physics, there are some common issues which arise when consideringcandidates’ answers.There is often a range of acceptable responses which would sensibly answer a particular question.However, it is often difficult to anticipate all correct or partially correct responses to questions.The detailed marking instructions contain ideal answers, and examples of other acceptable answerswhich offer guidance for interpreting candidates’ responses. They may also contain advice on answerswhich are not acceptable, or only attract partial marks.UnitsDo not penalise use of upper/lower case when the abbreviated version is given, as long as it can beclearly identified, eg DB, sV, hZ, bq.However, take care to ensure the unit has the correct prefix, eg for an answer t 0·005 seconds,t 5 ms is acceptable but t 5 Ms is not.Where a candidate makes multiple unit errors or conversion errors/omissions in any part of a question,penalise once only. For example, when calculating speed from distance and time, and the answer isrequired to be in m s-1. (GMP 14)Ifd 4 km and t 2 minutesdt400v 2v 200v (1)(1)(0)Although the candidate has made three unit errors, (not correctly converted distance or time and hasomitted the final unit), do not award the final mark only.Some common units often attract incorrect abbreviations in answers to numerical questions.When the abbreviation can be confused with a different unit then the final mark cannot be awarded,eg sec or secs as an abbreviation for seconds is not acceptable.Common units and abbreviationsAcceptable unit and abbreviationsecond, shours, hampere, amp, amps, A, ametres per second, m/s, m s-1metres per second per second, m/s2, m s-2joules per kilogram per degree celsius,J kg-1 ºC-1, J/kg ºCunacceptable versionsec, secshr, hrsmps, m/s-1m/s/s, mpsps, m/s-2J/kg/ºCpage 04

Standard formWhere a candidate fails to express an answer in standard form correctly, treat it as an arithmeticerror and do not award the final mark. For example:For an answer t 400 000 s, then t 4 105 s would be correct but t 45 s would be treated as anarithmetic error. (GMP 13)Incorrect answer carried forward (GMP 17)Do not apply a further penalty where a candidate carries forward an incorrect answer to part of aquestion, and uses that incorrect answer correctly: within that part of the question, eg from (a)(i) to (a)(ii) or to the next part of the question, eg from (a) to (b).Similarly, if a candidate has selected the wrong value in a question which requires a data value, thenaward full marks in the subsequent answer for a correct response that uses either the candidate’swrong value or the correct data value. For example:(a)State the speed of microwaves in air.Candidate’s answer: 240 m s-1. This answer would attract zero marks.(b)Calculate the distance travelled by these microwaves in 0·34 seconds.The candidate may use either the value given in part (a) or the correct value for the speed,and could gain full marks if correctly completed.Where an incorrect answer may be carried forward, this is indicated in the additional guidance columnof the detailed marking instructions by the comment ‘or consistent with part.’.Standard three markerThe examples below set out how to apportion marks to answers requiring calculations. These are the‘standard three marker’ type of questions.Award full marks for a correct answer to a numerical question, even if the steps are not shownexplicitly, unless it specifically requires evidence of working to be shown.For some questions requiring numerical calculations, there may be alternative methods(eg alternative relationships) which would lead to a correct answer.Sometimes, a question requires a calculation which does not fit into the ‘standard three marker’ typeof response. In these cases, the detailed marking instructions will contain guidance for marking thequestion.When marking partially correct answers, apportion individual marks as shown over the page.page 05

Example of a ‘standard three marker’ questionThe current in a resistor is 1·5 amperes when the potential difference across it is 7·5 volts. Calculatethe resistance of the resistor. (3 marks)Candidate answerMark and comment1.V IR7·5 1·5 RR 5·0 Ω1 mark: relationship1 mark: substitution1 mark: correct answer2.5·0 Ω3 marks: correct answer3.5·02 marks: unit missing4.4 ·0 Ω0 marks: no evidence, wrong answer5.Ω0 marks: no working or final answer6.V 7·5R 4·0 ΩI 1·52 marks: arithmetic error7.VR 4·0 Ω I1 mark: relationship only8.VR ΩI1 mark: relationship only9.V 7·5R ΩI 1·52 marks: relationship and substitution, no final answer10.V 7·5R 4·0I 1·52 marks: relationship and substitution, wrong answer11.V 1·5R 5·0 ΩI 7·51 mark: relationship but wrong substitution12.V 75R 5·0 ΩI 1·51 mark: relationship but wrong substitution13.I 7·5R 5·0 ΩV 1·50 marks: wrong relationship14. 15.V IR7·5 1·5 RR 0·2 ΩV IRI 1·5R 0·2 ΩV 7·52 marks: relationship and substitution, arithmetic error1 mark: relationship only, wrong rearrangement of symbolspage 06

Marking Instructions for each questionSection 19.D120.A121.B122.A123.E124.D125.B1page 07

Section 2Question1(a)(i)Expected responseUsing Pythagoras:Resultant2 12·02 5·02Resultant 13mMaxmark2(1)(1)Using scale diagram:Additional guidanceIgnore any direction stated in thefinal answer in this part.If clear arithmetic error shown in16 – 4 12 or 11 – 6 5 then MAX (1)mark for substitution consistent witharithmetic error.No requirement for arrows to beshown on diagram to calculate themagnitude of displacement.Regardless of method, if a candidateshows a vector diagram (or arepresentation of a vector diagramie a triangle with no arrows) and thevectors have been addedincorrectly, eg head-to-head thenMAX (1).Vectors to scaleResultant 13m(allow 0·5 m tolerance)(1)(1)page 08

Question(ii)Expected responseUsing trigonometry:tanθ 5·012·0MaxmarkAdditional guidance2Or use of resultant value (andappropriate trigonometry) consistentwith (a)(i).(1)Accept:23º South of East67º East of South(θ 23 )direction 113(1)Ignore the degree symbol if thedirection is stated as a bearing.Can also do using other trigfunctions, eg5·012·0sin θ or cos θ 1313Using scale diagram:Regardless of method, if a candidateshows a vector diagram (or arepresentation of a vector diagramie a triangle with no arrows) and thevectors have been addedincorrectly, eg head-to-head thenMAX (1).Accept:20º S of E22·6º S of E22·62º S of E(b)Vectors to scaleDirection 113(allow 2º tolerance)(1)(1)s vt(1)13 v 32·5v 0·40 ms-1 at (bearing) 113(1)(1)3110112·6112·62Or consistent with (a)(i) and/or(a)(ii)Accept d vt provided it is followedby a substitution of the value fordisplacement.Direction required for final mark.Accept 1-4 sig figs:0·4 m s-10·400 m s-10·4000 m s-1page 09

Question1.(c)Expected responseMaxmarkd vt(1)37·0 1·25 t(1)3(t 29·6 s)(d)(1)(The forces are) equal (in size) andopposite (in direction).Accept s vt provided it is followedby a substitution of the value fordistance.Accept 1-4 sig figs:3s2·90 s2·900 sdifference in time 32·5 29·6 2·9sAdditional guidance1Accept: ‘(the forces are) balanced’Do not accept ‘lift equals weight’alone.page 10

Question2.(a)(i)Expected responsev ut20 0a 8a (1)MaxmarkAdditional guidance2** SHOW THAT **Must start with a correct relationshipor (0) marksΔvAccept: a tvDo not accept: a t(1)a 2·5 ms-2Accept methods starting with:a gradientΔyΔxy2 y1or a x2 x1However substitutions for two pointson the line must be shown for thesecond mark.or a Accept consistent use of any othervalues for v, u and t in the first 9·6 sof the graph.Final answer of 2·5 ms-2, includingunit, must be shown or MAX (1).(ii)(iii)(A)(B)(b)F ma(1)925 m 2·5(1)m 370 kg(1) F 1200-925 3Accept 1-4 sig figs:400 kg370 0 kg1F 275 N1d 8·0 202d 80 mIgnore any direction stated.Unit must be stated.streamlined (shape)has wheelsaerodynamicd area under graphMust use a value of 2·5 ms 2 foracceleration.1Or any other suitable response.Apply /- rule for surplus answers(1)(1)(1)3If incorrect substitution then MAX (1)for (implied) relationship.Accept s vt or d vt forrelationship mark.Accept s vt or d vt , providedsubstitution of average velocity/speed is correct.Accept 1-4 sig figs:80·0 m80·00 mpage 11

Question3.Expected responseMaxmarkDemonstrates no understanding(0 marks)3Demonstrates limited understanding(1 mark)Demonstrates reasonableunderstanding(2 marks)Demonstrates good understanding(3 marks)This is an open-ended question.1 mark: The student hasdemonstrated a limitedunderstanding of the physicsinvolved. The student has madesome statement(s), which is/arerelevant to the situation, showingthat at least a little of the physicswithin the problem is understood.2 marks: The student hasdemonstrated a reasonableunderstanding of the physicsinvolved. The student makes somestatement(s), which is/are relevantto the situation, showing that theproblem is understood.3 marks: The maximum availablemark would be awarded to a studentwho has demonstrated a goodunderstanding of the physicsinvolved. The student shows a goodcomprehension of the physics of thesituation and has provided a logicallycorrect answer to the questionposed. This type of response mightinclude a statement of the principlesinvolved, a relationship or anequation, and the application ofthese to respond to the problem.This does not mean the answer hasto be what might be termed an“excellent” answer or a “complete”one.page 12Additional guidanceOpen-ended question: a variety ofphysics arguments can be used toanswer this question.Marks are awarded on the basis ofwhether the answer overalldemonstrates “no”, “limited”,“reasonable” or “good”understanding.

Question4.(a)(b)Expected responseMaxmarkHydrogen, helium and mercury1(i)The distance light travels in oneyear.1(ii)d vt(1)d 3·0 108 3(1)(60 60 24 365·25 97)d 9·2 1017 (m)(1)Additional guidanceMust have all three.Calculation can be carried out insteps, but all steps must be done forthe substitution mark to beawarded, eg calculation of distancefor one light-year, followed bymultiplying this by 97.Unit in final answer not required,but if stated, must be correct.Accept 1-4 sig fig:9 10179·18 10179·183 1017Also accept, if using 365 days:9·177 1017(c)(i)No atmosphere to absorb light1full range of EM waves can beobservedOr other suitable responseDo not accept ‘closer’ but would notnegate a correct response.can be used in cloudy weather/daytimeApply /- rule for surplus answersno light pollution(ii)GPS1weather forecastingOr other suitable responseDo not accept responses relating tospace observationcommunicationsscientific discoveryApply /- rule for surplus answerspage 13

5.QuestionExpected responseMaxmark(a)suitable scales, labels and units (1)3(i)(ii)all points plotted accurately to half a division(1)best fit curve(1)(Resistance of wire) increases(as the length of wire increases) (1)2Effect must be correct, otherwise(0) marks.Can be justified by suitablecalculations involving currents fromthe table/graph.10·55 AA non-linear scale on either axisprevents access to any marks (0).Allow broken axes from origin (withor without symbol)Current decreases (as the lengthof wire increases).(1)(iii)Additional guidanceMust be consistent with candidate’scurve or line.Unit requiredIf a candidate has not shown a curveor line in (a)(i) this mark cannot beaccessed.If candidate has used a non-linearscale in (a)(i) this mark cannot beaccessed.(iv)repeat (and average)1Accept: increase the range of lengths increase the number of differentlengthsIf candidates use the terms‘accurate’ and/or ‘precise’ in theirresponse, they must be usedcorrectly otherwise (0).page 14

Question5.(b)Expected responseMaxmark Resistance will be less (than5·2 Ω)(1)(The wire now has) shorter length(between X and Y)OR(Two wires are) connected inparallel2Additional guidanceFirst mark can only be awarded if ajustification is attempted.Effect correct justification correct(2)Effect correct justificationincomplete (1)(1)Effect correct justificationincorrect (wrong physics) (0)Effect correct no justificationattempted (0)Incorrect or no effect statedregardless of justification (0)If candidate tries to justify this bycalculation, then the substitutionmust be correct (R1 and R2 are bothequal to 2·6 Ω) or (0) marks.page 15

Question6.(a)(i)Expected responseTotal R 180 180 120Maxmark(1)4( 480 Ω)V IR(1)12 I 480(1)Calculation of resistance may beimplied by correct substitution.If no attempt to calculate theresistance, or incorrect substitutionto calculate resistance, then MAX (1)for relationship.If clear arithmetic error is shown inthe calculation of total resistancethen MAX (3).(1)I 0·025 AAdditional guidanceAccept 1-4 sig figs:0·03 A0·025 0 A0·025 00 AFor alternative methods:(1) for all required relationships(1) for all substitutions(1) for final answer including unit(ii)P I 2R(1)P 0·0252 120(1)3Accept 1-4 sig figs:0·08 W0·075 0 W0·075 00 W(1)P 0·075 WOr consistent with (a)(i)For alternative methods:(1) for all required relationships(1) for all substitutions(1) for final answer including unit(b)(i)1 1 1 RT R1 R2(1)111 RT 720 720(1)4Do not accept wrong relationship eg1 1 1 R3RT R1 R2OR(RT 360 Ω)RT Rtotal 360 120(0) marksIf arithmetic error in parallelresistance calculation, can stillaccess mark for adding the 120 Ωresistance, ie MAX (3).(1)(1)Rtotal 480 Ω1 1 R1 R2If a candidate attempts to calculateall three in parallel (0) marks.(ii)(Power will be) the same(1)Current (in the 120 Ω resistor)will be the same(1)page 162or consistent with (a)(ii) and (b)(i)For justification mark accept:voltage across the 120 Ω resistor willbe the same.

Question7.(a)(b)Expected responseEtE3500 26E 91000 J(1)Eh cmΔT(1)P (i)(ii)MaxmarkAdditional guidance2** SHOW THAT **Must start with a correct relationshipor (0) marks(1)Final answer of 91 000 J or itsnumerical equivalent, including unit,must be shown, otherwise amaximum of (1) can be awarded. 4180 0 250 80 0(1) 83 600 J(1)Eh 91000 83 600(1)3Accept 2–5 sig figs:84 000 J4Or consistent with (b)(i) 7400 J Calculation of energy difference maybe implied by correct substitution.Eh ml7400 m 22 6 10(1)5m 0 0033 kgIf no attempt to calculate the energydifference, or incorrect substitutionto calculate energy difference, thenMAX (1) for relationship.(1)(1)If clear arithmetic error is shown incalculation of energy differencethen MAX (3).accept: 1–4 sig figs:0·003 kg0·003 27 kg0·003 274 kg(iii) Heat (energy) lost to thesurroundings.1ORSome of the heat (energy) is used toheat the dispenser.page 17Accept:not all the heat (energy) istransferred into the water.Do not accept:‘heat loss’ alone – it must be clearwhere it is going.

Question8.Expected responseMaxmark(a)2Additional guidanceIndependent marks.Name and direction required foreach mark.Accept:‘force of water on air in bottle’‘force of water on rocket’Do not accept:‘upward force’ alone‘lift (force)’‘upthrust’Accept:‘gravitational pull’‘pull of gravity’Do not accept:‘gravity’ aloneApply /- rule for surplus incorrectforces acting on the bottle for eachof the independent marks.(b)p 1·74 105 FAF4·50 10 3F 783 N(1)(1)(1)page 183Accept 2-5 sig figs:780 N783·0 N783·00 N

Question8.(c)(i)Expected responseMaxmark4New volume of air 7·5 10 4 1·2 10 4 8·7 10 4m3(1) 1·74 105 7·5 10-4 p2 8·7 10 4(1)If clear arithmetic error is shown incalculation of new volume of airthen MAX (3).(1)5p2 1·5 10 PaCalculation of new volume of airmay be implied by correctsubstitution.If no attempt to calculate the newvolume, or incorrect substitution tocalculate new volume of air, thenMAX (1) for relationship.(1)p1V1 p2V2Additional guidanceAccept 1-4 sig figs:2 105 Pa1·50 105 Pa1·500 105 PaAcceptp1V1 p2V2 T1T2(ii)(individual) particles collide withcontainer/walls less frequently(than before)(1)(overall) force (on walls) is less(1)pressure decreases(1)3orpV constantTIndependent marks.However, if the candidate indicatesthat individual collisions haveless/more force or the particlesmove slower/faster, then do notaward the first mark.Accept ‘atoms’/’molecules’ in placeof ‘particles’.page 19

Question9.(a)(b)Expected responseMaxmarkv f λ (1)3·0 108 153 106 λ( 1)λ 2·0 m (1)The speed of light is (much) greaterthan the speed of sound.(1)Additional guidance3Accept 1-4 sig figs:2m1·96 m1·961 m2Do not accept ‘different speeds’alone for first mark.The sound takes more time to travel(the 100 m).(1)Must make clear which arrives firstfor the second mark.Any statement that sound travelsfaster than light (0) marks,otherwise treat as independentmarks.(c)(i)1Ek mv 224·5 105 0·5 25000 v2v 6·0 ms(ii)(1)Accept 1-4 sig figs:6 ms 16·00 ms 1(1)6·000 ms 1(1) 1energy is lost (as heat and sound)due to friction/air resistancepage 2031

Question10.Expected responseMaxmarkAdditional n)1Accept:EM (spectrum/waves/radiation)(b)(The frequency of infrared is)less/lower (than the frequency ofgamma rays).1Accept:(The frequency of) gamma (rays) ishigher (than the frequency ofinfrared).(i)(A)(black-bulb) thermometer1(i)(B)radioactive waste1(ii)Treating skin conditions/jaundice1(c)Checking security markings onbanknotesProduces vitamin DDisinfection of hospital instrumentsTo ‘cure’ or harden compositematerial for fillings or nail gel/polishTanning/Sun-bedspage 21Any other sensible suggestionApply /- rule for surplus answers

Question11.(a)Expected responseMaxmark(i)2Additional guidanceIndependent marks.Normal not required for ray leavingblock. If drawn can be ignored inthis part.Arrows not required.Any change of direction of ray withinthe block then do not award the firstmark.(ii)correct change in direction onentering block(1)correct change in directionleaving the block(1)(the) normal(wavelength is the) sameDo not accept ray in the block drawnalong or below the normal for thefirst mark.1(iii) angle of incidence labelledcorrectly.(b)Any change of direction of ray afterit has left the block then do notaward the second mark.(1)the blocks are made of the samematerial.(1)1If the angle of incidence is markedon the emergent ray then a secondcorrectly drawn normal is required.2Effect must be correct otherwise (0)marks.Accept:the blocks have the same opticaldensitythe blocks have the same refractiveindexsame amount of refraction takesplacethe light travels at the same speedin both blockspage 22

Question12.(a)Expected responseMaxmarkMeasure the count in a set time (1)3Repeat at (regular) intervals(1)Additional guidanceIndependent marksDo not accept ‘activity’ as analternative to counts in a set time(do not award first mark).(Measure and) subtract background(count)(1)Description must refer to theapparatus shown. If a candidateresponse makes reference to using aratemeter, then MAX (2) marks.(First mark cannot be awarded.)(b)(c)(i)Carry out experiment over a longertime period.1Em1·2 10-6D 80·03D (1)(ii)D 1·5 10 Gy(1)H DwR(1)(1)4·5 10-8 1·5 10-8 wR1·500 10 8 Gy3(Photographic) film blackened/darkened/foggedor consistent with (c)(i)Ignore any identification of a type ofradiation.(1)wR 3(d)1·50 10 8 Gy(1)-8Accept 1-4 sig figs:2 10 8 Gy2Independent marks(1)(Film behind) different windowsaffected by different types ofradiation(1)page 23Accept:(Photographic) film changes colourFor the second mark accept anindication of the absorption/penetration of radiations by thematerials in the windows, howeverany incorrect statement about theabsorption/penetration of a type ofradiation means this mark cannot beawarded.

Question13.Expected responseMaxmarkDemonstrates no understanding(0 marks)Demonstrates limited understanding(1 mark)Demonstrates reasonableunderstanding(2 marks)3Demonstrates good understanding(3 marks)Additional guidanceOpen-ended question: a variety ofphysics arguments can be used toanswer this question.Marks are awarded on the basis ofwhether the answer overalldemonstrates “no”, “limited”,“reasonable” or “good”understanding.This is an open-ended question.1 mark: The student hasdemonstrated a limitedunderstanding of the physicsinvolved. The student has madesome statement(s), which is/arerelevant to the situation, showingthat at least a little of the physicswithin the problem is understood.2 marks: The student hasdemonstrated a reasonableunderstanding of the physicsinvolved. The student makes somestatement(s), which is/are relevantto the situation, showing that theproblem is understood.3 marks: The maximum availablemark would be awarded to a studentwho has demonstrated a goodunderstanding of the physicsinvolved. The student shows a goodcomprehension of the physics of thesituation and has provided a logicallycorrect answer to the questionposed. This type of response mightinclude a statement of the principlesinvolved, a relationship or anequation, and the application ofthese to respond to the problem.This does not mean the answer hasto be what might be termed an“excellent” answer or a “complete”one.[END OF MARKING INSTRUCTIONS]page 24

2019 2019 Physics National 5 Finalised Marking Instructions . marking candidate responses to questions in this paper. These principles must be read in conjunction . Question Answer Mark 1. A 1 2. B 1 3. E 1 4. C 1 5. C 1 6. B 1 7. C 1

Related Documents:

Physics 20 General College Physics (PHYS 104). Camosun College Physics 20 General Elementary Physics (PHYS 20). Medicine Hat College Physics 20 Physics (ASP 114). NAIT Physics 20 Radiology (Z-HO9 A408). Red River College Physics 20 Physics (PHYS 184). Saskatchewan Polytechnic (SIAST) Physics 20 Physics (PHYS 184). Physics (PHYS 182).

Advanced Placement Physics 1 and Physics 2 are offered at Fredericton High School in a unique configuration over three 90 h courses. (Previously Physics 111, Physics 121 and AP Physics B 120; will now be called Physics 111, Physics 121 and AP Physics 2 120). The content for AP Physics 1 is divided

EMIR Update – ESMA Publishes Finalised Technical Standards – 27 September 2012 1 October 2012 EMIR Update - ESMA Publishes Finalised Technical Standards Introduction The European Securities and Markets Authority (“ESMA”) published on 27 September its technical standards and final report on EMIR, 4 days before

2019 2019 Chemistry National 5 Finalised Marking Instructions Scottish Qualifications Authority 2019 These marking instructions have been prepared by examination teams for use by SQA appointed markers when marking external course assessments. The information in this document may be r

General Physics: There are two versions of the introductory general physics sequence. Physics 145/146 is intended for students planning no further study in physics. Physics 155/156 is intended for students planning to take upper level physics courses, including physics majors, physics combined majors, 3-2 engineering majors and BBMB majors.

Physics SUMMER 2005 Daniel M. Noval BS, Physics/Engr Physics FALL 2005 Joshua A. Clements BS, Engr Physics WINTER 2006 Benjamin F. Burnett BS, Physics SPRING 2006 Timothy M. Anna BS, Physics Kyle C. Augustson BS, Physics/Computational Physics Attending graduate school at Univer-sity of Colorado, Astrophysics. Connelly S. Barnes HBS .

PHYSICS 249 A Modern Intro to Physics _PIC Physics 248 & Math 234, or consent of instructor; concurrent registration in Physics 307 required. Not open to students who have taken Physics 241; Open to Freshmen. Intended primarily for physics, AMEP, astronomy-physics majors PHYSICS 265 Intro-Medical Ph

Electromagnetics and Applications - MIT OpenCourseWare . Preface - ix -