NotesonMathematics-1021

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Notes on Mathematics - 1021Peeyush Chandra,1Supported by a grant from MHRDA. K. Lal,V. Raghavendra,G. Santhanam

2

ContentsILinear Algebra1 Matrices1.1 Definition of a Matrix . . . . . .1.1.1 Special Matrices . . . . .1.2 Operations on Matrices . . . . .1.2.1 Multiplication of Matrices1.3 Some More Special Matrices . . .1.3.1 Submatrix of a Matrix . .1.3.1 Block Matrices . . . . . .1.4 Matrices over Complex Numbers27.Linear System of Equations2.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.2 Definition and a Solution Method . . . . . . .2.2.1 A Solution Method . . . . . . . . . . .2.3 Row Operations and Equivalent Systems . . .2.3.1 Gauss Elimination Method . . . . . .2.4 Row Reduced Echelon Form of a Matrix . . .2.4.1 Gauss-Jordan Elimination . . . . . . .2.4.2 Elementary Matrices . . . . . . . . . .2.5 Rank of a Matrix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.6 Existence of Solution of Ax b . . . . . . . .2.6.1 Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.6.2 Main Theorem . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.6.3 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.7 Invertible Matrices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.7.1 Inverse of a Matrix . . . . . . . . . . .2.7.2 Equivalent conditions for Invertibility2.7.3 Inverse and Gauss-Jordan Method . .2.8 Determinant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.8.1 Adjoint of a Matrix . . . . . . . . . .2.8.2 Cramer’s Rule . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.9 Miscellaneous Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . 3739404345463 Finite Dimensional Vector Spaces493.1 Vector Spaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 493.1.1 Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 493.1.2 Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

4CONTENTS.5354575860664 Linear Transformations4.1 Definitions and Basic Properties4.2 Matrix of a linear transformation4.3 Rank-Nullity Theorem . . . . . .4.4 Similarity of Matrices . . . . . .6969727580.878792100103.107. 107. 113. 116. 1213.23.33.43.1.3 Subspaces . . . . . .3.1.4 Linear CombinationsLinear Independence . . . .Bases . . . . . . . . . . . .3.3.1 Important Results .Ordered Bases . . . . . . .5 Inner Product Spaces5.1 Definition and Basic Properties . . . . . . .5.2 Gram-Schmidt Orthogonalisation Process .5.3 Orthogonal Projections and Applications . .5.3.1 Matrix of the Orthogonal Projection.6 Eigenvalues, Eigenvectors and Diagonalization6.1 Introduction and Definitions . . . . . . . . . . .6.2 diagonalization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.3 Diagonalizable matrices . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.4 Sylvester’s Law of Inertia and Applications . .II.Ordinary Differential Equation7 Differential Equations7.1 Introduction and Preliminaries . . . . . . . . .7.2 Separable Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.2.1 Equations Reducible to Separable Form7.3 Exact Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.3.1 Integrating Factors . . . . . . . . . . . .7.4 Linear Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.5 Miscellaneous Remarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.6 Initial Value Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.6.1 Orthogonal Trajectories . . . . . . . . .7.7 Numerical Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129.8 Second Order and Higher Order Equations8.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.2 More on Second Order Equations . . . . . . . . . .8.2.1 Wronskian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.2.2 Method of Reduction of Order . . . . . . .8.3 Second Order equations with Constant Coefficients8.4 Non Homogeneous Equations . . . . . . . . . . . .8.5 Variation of Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.6 Higher Order Equations with Constant Coefficients.131. 131. 134. 134. 136. 138. 141. 143. 145. 149. 150.153. 153. 156. 156. 159. 160. 162. 164. 166

CONTENTS8.75Method of Undetermined Coefficients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1709 Solutions Based on Power Series9.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9.1.1 Properties of Power Series . . . . . . . . . . . . .9.2 Solutions in terms of Power Series . . . . . . . . . . . .9.3 Statement of Frobenius Theorem for Regular (Ordinary)9.4 Legendre Equations and Legendre Polynomials . . . . .9.4.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9.4.2 Legendre Polynomials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .III.Laplace Transform18910 Laplace Transform10.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10.2 Definitions and Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . .10.2.1 Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10.3 Properties of Laplace Transform . . . . . . . . .10.3.1 Inverse Transforms of Rational Functions10.3.2 Transform of Unit Step Function . . . . .10.4 Some Useful Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10.4.1 Limiting Theorems . . . . . . . . . . . . .10.5 Application to Differential Equations . . . . . . .10.6 Transform of the Unit-Impulse Function . . . . .IV. . . . . . . . . .Point. . . . . . . . . .Numerical 1 Newton’s Interpolation Formulae11.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11.2 Difference Operator . . . . . . . . . .11.2.1 Forward Difference Operator .11.2.2 Backward Difference Operator11.2.3 Central Difference Operator . .11.2.4 Shift Operator . . . . . . . . .11.2.5 Averaging Operator . . . . . .11.3 Relations between Difference operators11.4 Newton’s Interpolation Formulae . . .12 Lagrange’s Interpolation Formula12.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . .12.2 Divided Differences . . . . . . . .12.3 Lagrange’s Interpolation formula12.4 Gauss’s and Stirling’s Formulas .175. 175. 177. 179. 180. 181. 181. 182.209. 209. 209. 209. 211. 213. 214. 214. 214. 215.221. 221. 221. 224. 22613 Numerical Differentiation and Integration22913.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22913.2 Numerical Differentiation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22913.3 Numerical Integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233

6CONTENTS13.3.1 A General Quadrature Formula . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23313.3.2 Trapezoidal Rule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23413.3.3 Simpson’s Rule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23514 Appendix14.1 System of Linear Equations . .14.2 Determinant . . . . . . . . . . .14.3 Properties of Determinant . . .14.4 Dimension of M N . . . . . .14.5 Proof of Rank-Nullity Theorem14.6 Condition for Exactness . . . .239. 239. 242. 246. 250. 251. 252

Part ILinear Algebra

Chapter 1Matrices1.1Definition of a MatrixDefinition 1.1.1 (Matrix) A rectangular array of numbers is called a matrix.We shall mostly be concerned with matrices having real numbers as entries.The horizontal arrays of a matrix are called its rows and the vertical arrays are called its columns.A matrix having m rows and n columns is said to have the order m n.A matrix A of order m n can be represented in the following form: a11 a21A . .am1a12a22.am2······.··· a1n a2n . ,. amnwhere aij is the entry at the intersection of the ith row and j th column.In a more concise manner, we also denote the matrix A by [aij ] by suppressing its order. a11 a21Remark 1.1.2 Some books also use . .am1"a12a22.am2······.··· a1n a2n . to represent a matrix. amn#1 3 7. Then a11 1, a12 3, a13 7, a21 4, a22 5, and a23 6.Let A 4 5 6A matrix having only one column is called a column vector; and a matrix with only one row iscalled a row vector.Whenever a vector is used, it should be understood from the context whether it isa row vector or a column vector.Definition 1.1.3 (Equality of two Matrices) Two matrices A [aij ] and B [bij ] having the same orderm n are equal if aij bij for each i 1, 2, . . . , m and j 1, 2, . . . , n.In other words, two matrices are said to be equal if they have the same order and their correspondingentries are equal.

10CHAPTER 1. MATRICESExample" 1.1.4 The# linear system of equations 2x 3y 5 and 3x 2y 5 can be identified with the2 3 : 5matrix.3 2 : 51.1.1Special MatricesDefinition 1.1.5example,1. A matrix in which each entry is zero is called a zero-matrix, denoted by 0. For02 2"0 0#"00 0and 02 3 00 0#0.02. A matrix having the number of rows equal to the number of columns is called a square matrix. Thus,its order is m m (for some m) and is represented by m only.3. In a square matrix, A [aij ], of order n, the entries a11 , a22 , . . . , ann are called the diagonal entriesand form the principal diagonal of A.4. A square matrix A [aij ] is said to be a diagonal matrix if aij 0 for i 6 j. In other words,#" the4 0non-zero entries appear only on the principal diagonal. For example, the zero matrix 0n and0 1are a few diagonal matrices.A diagonal matrix D of order n with the diagonal entries d1 , d2 , . . . , dn is denoted by D diag(d1 , . . . , dn ).If di d for all i 1, 2, . . . , n then the diagonal matrix D is called a scalar matrix.(1 if i j5. A square matrix A [aij ] with aij 0 if i 6 jis called the identity matrix, denoted by In . #"1 0 01 0 , and I3 0 1 0 .For example, I2 0 10 0 1The subscript n is suppressed in case the order is clear from the context or if no confusion arises.6. A square matrix A [aij ] is said to be an upper triangular matrix if aij 0 for i j.A square matrix A [aij ] is said to be an lower triangular matrix if aij 0 for i j.A square matrix A is said to be triangular if it is an upper or a lower triangular matrix. 2 1 4 For example 0 3 1 is an upper triangular matrix. An upper triangular matrix will be represented0 0 2 a11 a12 · · · a1n 0 a22 · · · a2n by . . . . 00 · · · ann1.2Operations on MatricesDefinition 1.2.1 (Transpose of a Matrix) The transpose of an m n matrix A [aij ] is defined as then m matrix B [bij ], with bij aji for 1 i m and 1 j n. The transpose of A is denoted by At .

1.2. OPERATIONS ON MATRICES11That is, by the transpose of an m n matrix A, we mean a matrix of order n m having the rowsof A as its columns and the columns of A as its rows. "#1 01 4 5 For example, if A then At 4 1 .0 1 25 2Thus, the transpose of a row vector is a column vector and vice-versa.Theorem 1.2.2 For any matrix A, we have (At )t A.Proof. Let A [aij ], At [bij ] and (At )t [cij ]. Then, the definition of transpose givescij bji aij for all i, jand the result follows. Definition 1.2.3 (Addition of Matrices) let A [aij ] and B [bij ] be are two m n matrices. Then thesum A B is defined to be the matrix C [cij ] with cij aij bij .Note that, we define the sum of two matrices only when the order of the two matrices are same.Definition 1.2.4 (Multiplying a Scalar to a Matrix) Let A [aij ] be an m n matrix. Then for anyelement k R, we define kA [kaij ].##""5 20 251 4 5.and k 5, then 5A For example, if A 0 5 100 1 2Theorem 1.2.5 Let A, B and C be matrices of order m n, and let k, ℓ R. Then1. A B B A2. (A B) C A (B C)(commutativity).(associativity).3. k(ℓA) (kℓ)A.4. (k ℓ)A kA ℓA.Proof. Part 1.Let A [aij ] and B [bij ]. ThenA B [aij ] [bij ] [aij bij ] [bij aij ] [bij ] [aij ] B Aas real numbers commute.The reader is required to prove the other parts as all the results follow from the properties of realnumbers. Exercise 1.2.61. Suppose A B A. Then show that B 0.2. Suppose A B 0. Then show that B ( 1)A [ aij ].Definition 1.2.7 (Additive Inverse) Let A be an m n matrix.1. Then there exists a matrix B with A B 0. This matrix B is called the additive inverse of A, andis denoted by A ( 1)A.2. Also, for the matrix 0m n , A 0 0 A A. Hence, the matrix 0m n is called the additive identity.

12CHAPTER 1. MATRICES1.2.1Multiplication of MatricesDefinition 1.2.8 (Matrix Multiplication / Product) Let A [aij ] be an m n matrix and B [bij ] bean n r matrix. The product AB is a matrix C [cij ] of order m r, withcij nXk 1aik bkj ai1 b1j ai2 b2j · · · ain bnj .Observe that the product AB is defined if and only ifthe number of columns of A the numberof rows of B. "#1 2 11 2 3 For example, if A and B 0 0 3 then2 4 11 0 4"1 0 3 2 0 0AB 2 0 1 4 0 0# "1 6 124 2 12 43#2 19.4 18Note that in this example, while AB is defined, the product BA is not defined. However, for squarematrices A and B of the same order, both the product AB and BA are defined.Definition 1.2.9 Two square matrices A and B are said to commute if AB BA.Remark 1.2.101. Note that if A is a square matrix of order n then AIn In A. Also for any d R,the matrix dIn commutes with every square matrix of order n. The matrices dIn for any d Rare called scalar matrices.2. In general, the# commutative. For example, consider the following two# product" is not" matrix1 01 1. Then check that the matrix productand B matrices A 1 00 0"2AB 0# "106 10#1 BA.1Theorem 1.2.11 Suppose that the matrices A, B and C are so chosen that the matrix multiplications aredefined.1. Then (AB)C A(BC). That is, the matrix multiplication is associative.2. For any k R, (kA)B k(AB) A(kB).3. Then A(B C) AB AC. That is, multiplication distributes over addition.4. If A is an n n matrix then AIn In A A.5. For any square matrix A of order n and D diag(d1 , d2 , . . . , dn ), we have the first row of DA is d1 times the first row of A; for 1 i n, the ith row of DA is di times the ith row of A.A similar statement holds for the columns of A when A is multiplied on the right by D.Proof. Part 1.Let A [aij ]m n , B [bij ]n p and C [cij ]p q . Then(BC)kj pXℓ 1bkℓ cℓj and (AB)iℓ nXk 1aik bkℓ .

1.3. SOME MORE SPECIAL MATRICES13Therefore, A(BC) ij nXaik BCk 1pn XXPart 5.k 1 ℓ 1p XnX(AB)CFor all j 1, 2, . . . , n, we have(DA)ij kj nXaikk 1 aik bkℓ cℓj ℓ 1 k 1 pXbkℓ cℓjℓ 1pn XXk 1 ℓ 1 aik bkℓ cℓjtX aik bkℓ cℓj AB iℓ cℓjℓ 1 ijnX.dik akj di aijk 1as dik 0 whenever i 6 k. Hence, the required result follows.The reader is required to prove the other parts. Exercise 1.2.121. Let A and B be two matrices. If the matrix addition A B is defined, then provethat (A B)t At B t . Also, if the matrix product AB is defined then prove that (AB)t B t At . b1 b2 2. Let A [a1 , a2 , . . . , an ] and B . . Compute the matrix products AB and BA. . bn3. Let n be a positive integer. Compute An for the following #"1 1 11 1 , 0 1 1 ,0 10 0 1Can you guess a formula for An and prove it by induction?matrices: 1 1 1 11 1 1 1 .14. Find examples for the following statements.(a) Suppose that the matrix product AB is defined. Then the product BA need not be defined.(b) Suppose that the matrix products AB and BA are defined. Then the matrices AB and BA canhave different orders.(c) Suppose that the matrices A and B are square matrices of order n. Then AB and BA may ormay not be equal.1.3Some More Special MatricesDefinition 1.3.11. A matrix A over R is called symmetric if At A and skew-symmetric if At A.2. A matrix A is said to be orthogonal if AAt At A I. 1 230 1 Example 1.3.21. Let A 2 4 1 and B 1 03 1 4 2 3B is a skew-symmetric matrix. 2 3 . Then A is a symmetric matrix and0

14CHAPTER 1. MATRICES2. Let A 13 1 2 16 13 12 16 13 0 . Then A is an orthogonal matrix. 263. Let A [aij ] be an n n matrix with aij 1 0if i j 1otherwise. Then An 0 and Aℓ 6 0 for 1 ℓ n 1. The matrices A for which a positive integer k exists such that Ak 0 are called nilpotentmatrices. The least positive integer k for which Ak 0 is called the order of nilpotency."#1 0. Then A2 A. The matrices that satisfy the condition that A2 A are called4. Let A 0 0idempotent matrices.Exercise 1.3.31. Show that for any square matrix A, S 12 (A At ) is symmetric, T 12 (A At ) isskew-symmetric, and A S T.2. Show that the product of two lower triangular matrices is a lower triangular matrix. A similar statementholds for upper triangular matrices.3. Let A and B be symmetric matrices. Show that AB is symmetric if and only if AB BA.4. Show that the diagonal entries of a skew-symmetric matrix are zero.5. Let A, B be skew-symmetric matrices with AB BA. Is the matrix AB symmetric or skew-symmetric?6. Let A be a symmetric matrix of order n with A2 0. Is it necessarily true that A 0?7. Let A be a nilpotent matrix. Show that there exists a matrix B such that B(I A) I (I A)B.1.3.1Submatrix of a MatrixDefinition 1.3.4 A matrix obtained by deleting some of the rows and/or columns of a matrix is said to bea submatrix of the given matrix."#1 4 5For example, if A , a few submatrices of A are0 1 2" #"11, [1 5],[1], [2],00"1But the matrices1#5, A.2##"41 4andare not submatrices of A. (The reader is advised to give reasons.)0 20Miscellaneous ExercisesExercise 1.3.5"1. Complete the proofs of Theorems 1.2.5 and 1.2.11.#"#"#" #cos θ sin θy11 0x1and B . Geometrically interpret y Ax, y , A 2. Let x sin θ cos θx2y20 1and y Bx.3. Consider the two coordinate transformationsy1 b11 z1 b12 z2x1 a11 y1

10 CHAPTER 1. MATRICES Example 1.1.4 The linear system of equations 2x 3y 5 and 3x 2y 5 can be identified with the matrix " 2 3 : 5 3 2 : 5 #. 1.1.1 Special Matrices

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