Name Date Common Final Syllables Phonics: Across America .

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Lesson 26NameReader’s NotebookDateThe Foot RaceAcross AmericaPhonics: Common FinalSyllables -tion, -sion, -tureCommon Final SyllablesChoose a word from the box to complete each sentence.Read the completed sentence.Word ussionpicturefurnitureprotection1. Give me the camera and I will take your.2. No one knew what to do, so there was a lot of.3. If you push the toy car, you set it in.4. This is important news, so pay.5. Yesterday is the past, and tomorrow is the6. An umbrella gives you.from the rain.7. Let’s have ato talk about our plans.8. Tables, chairs, and sofas are kinds of.9. I like that pirate movie because it has lots of10. Trees, animals, and clouds are all parts ofPhonics Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.159.Grade 3, Unit 6

Readers GuideLesson 26NameDateR e a d e r ’ s N o t e B OO KThe Foot RaceAcross AmericaIndependent ReadingReader ’s G uideThe Foot Race Across AmericaWrite a SpeechAndy Payne is receiving an award after the race, butfirst he must give a speech. Note important details fromthe text before you write the speech.Read page 7. What were the specific details of the race that Andysaw in the newspaper?Why did Andy want to run in the race?Read pages 8–9. What was the first part of the race like?Read page 10. What troubles did Andy and the runners face?Read pages 12–14. What happened at the end of the race?Independent Reading Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.160Grade 3, Unit 6

Lesson 26NameDateThe announcer steps onto the stage and says,“We will now present the award for Greatest RunningAchievement to Andy Payne. Andy, please tell us aboutthe race!” Write Andy’s speech.Independent Reading Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.161R e a d e r ’ s N o t e B OO KThe Foot RaceAcross AmericaIndependent ReadingGrade 3, Unit 6

Lesson 26NameDateWords with the VCCV PatternBasic: Write the Basic Word that best fits each clue.1. get pleasure from2. an error3. a human being4. where flowers grow5. opposite of remember6. a baseball official7. a command8. protects your head9. opposite of solution10. soft floor covering1.6.2.7.3.8.4.9.5.10.Reader’s NotebookThe Foot RaceAcross AmericaSpelling: Words with VCCVPatternSpelling WordsBasic1. person2. helmet3. until4. carpet5. Monday6. enjoy7. forget8. problem9. Sunday10. garden11. order12. mistake13. umpire14. herselfChallengeexpectwisdomChallenge: Write two sentences about how you mighthelp a friend reach a goal. Use both of the Challenge Words.Spelling Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.162Grade 3, Unit 6

Lesson 26NameDateREADER’S NOTEBOOKThe Foot RaceAcross AmericaSpelling: Words with VCCVPatternWord SortWrite each Basic Word next to the correct heading.Spelling WordsBasic1. person2. helmet3. until4. carpet5. Monday6. enjoy7. forget8. problem9. Sunday10. garden11. order12. mistake13. umpire14. herselfVowel a infirst syllableVowel e infirst syllableVowel i infirst syllableVowel o infirst syllableChallengeexpectwisdomVowel u infirst syllableChallenge: Add the Challenge Words to your Word Sort.Spelling Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.163Grade 3, Unit 6

Lesson 26NameDateProofreading for SpellingREADER’S NOTEBOOKThe Foot RaceAcross AmericaSpelling: Words with VCCVPatternFind the misspelled words and circle them. Write themcorrectly on the numbered lines below.Some Really Super Softball!Last Sundy, the Braden Bobcats’ fans got a big thrillwhen the Bobcats beat the Pinehill Pumas.The game was tied 1–1 in the last inning. The Bobcatbatters came up in ordor. First came Polly Peters, wholooked ready to win that game all by herrself. The Pumapitcher, though, couldn’t find the plate, and the umpeirecalled four balls in a row. Polly walked to first base.The next persen up to bat was Miko Myata. This time,the Puma pitcher’s probblem was wild pitches. When onepitch hit Miko’s helmit, Miko strolled to first base and Pollymoved to second.The pitcher made one last misteak when he threw aperfect pitch. Shayla Smith swung mightily. CRACK! Thatball was out of the park, and it probably didn’t land untillMunday. The Bobcats won it, 4–1!1.6.2.7.3.8.4.9.5.10.Spelling Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.164Spelling WordsBasic1. person2. helmet3. until4. carpet5. Monday6. enjoy7. forget8. problem9. Sunday10. garden11. order12. mistake13. umpire14. herselfGrade 3, Unit 6

Lesson 26NameDateAbbreviations for Daysand Months A n abbreviation is a shortened form of a word.Most abbreviations begin with a capital letterand end with a period.Monday; Mon.Reader’s NotebookThe Foot RaceAcross AmericaGrammarAbbreviationsThinking QuestionIs the word a day ofthe week or a monthof the year?August; Aug.Write the correct abbreviation for each day and month.1. Sunday2. December3. Tuesday4. Thursday5. Saturday6. November7. Wednesday8. September9. Friday10. FebruaryGrammarCopyright Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.165Unit 5: Going Places

Lesson 26NameDateAbbreviations for PlacesReader’s NotebookThe Foot RaceAcross AmericaGrammar:Abbreviations An abbreviation is a shortened form of a word. P laces with names that can be abbreviatedinclude roads, streets, lanes, avenues, andboulevards. Examples include Harrison Rd.,Maple St., Elmira Ln., Plainville Ave.,and Broad Blvd.Thinking QuestionIs the word the nameof a place?Write each place name correctly. Use capital letters andabbreviations.1. King Boulevard2. Jefferson Street3. Western Avenue4. Oak Road5. Chestnut Lane6. Ocean Boulevard7. Washington Street8. Smith Lane9. Vermont Avenue10. Lincoln StreetGrammar Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.166Grade 3, Unit 6

Lesson 26NameDateWriting Abbreviations1–5. Write the correct abbreviation for each day and month.Reader’s NotebookThe Foot RaceAcross AmericaGrammar:Abbreviations1. Tuesday2. January3. Friday4. October5. Saturday6–10. Abbreviate each place name correctly.6. Myer Lane7. Hudson Street8. Prospect Road9. Lynn Boulevard10. North AvenueGrammar Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.167Grade 3, Unit 6

Lesson 26NameReader’s NotebookDateThe Foot RaceAcross AmericaGrammar: Spiral ReviewPossessive Nouns A possessive noun shows that a person, an animal, ora thing owns or has something. To show that one person, animal, or thing has possession,add an apostrophe and -s (’s). To show that more than one person, animal, or thing haspossession, add an -s and an apostrophe (s’).NounteacherbookSingular Possessive Nounteacher’sbook’sPlural Possessive Nounteachers’books’Activity: Write the word in parentheses as a possessive nounto complete the sentence.1.home is in Oklahoma. (Andy)2. He runs in hisneighborhood. (cousin)3. Andy likes to run with thechildren. (neighbors)4. He times his running with hisstopwatch. (sister)5. Theprize is a huge trophy. (winner)6. Thefamilies all watched the race. (runners)7. Allen could hear the8. Eachchirps as he ran. (bird)shirt had a number. (contestant)9. Every runner could hear the10. Thecheers. (fans)statue of Andy shows him running. (town)Grammar Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.168Grade 3, Unit 6

Lesson 26NameDateConventions: ProofreadingProofreading your work for correctly spelledabbreviations will make your writing stronger.Incorrect AbbreviationReader’s NotebookThe Foot RaceAcross AmericaGrammarConnect to WritingCorrect Abbreviationtues; marTues.; Mar.av; rdAve.; Rd.Use proofreading marks to write abbreviations correctly in thisinformal note.Sun, Oct 3Liam,We stopped by Pleasant Str on fri and met your uncle’s family. He is awonderful man, and his kids and wife are great, too. We met Pat Smith, whois very nice. He lives in Miami. He has a house on Beach Blvd, near theocean. We are going to meet him and Cindy Birch next Tues for a al letterSmall letterGrammar Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.169Grade 3, Unit 6

Lesson 26NameDateReader’s NotebookThe Foot RaceAcross AmericaWriting: OrganizationFocus Trait: OrganizationRead each sentence that gives a comparing or contrasting detail.Write whether it compares or contrasts.Andy Payne and Peter Gavuzzi bothcompeted in the International Trans-Continental Foot Race.Both men were called “Bunioneers.”Andy was from Oklahoma, while Peterwas from England.Andy won in 1928, but Peter wonin 1929.Think of a topic sentence for a paragraph that compares Andyand Peter. Write the sentence. Then write a topic sentence for aparagraph that contrasts Andy and Peter.Comparing paragraph:Contrasting paragraph:Writing Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.170Grade 3, Unit 6: Make Your Mark

Lesson 27NameReader’s NotebookDateThe Powerof MagnetsPhonics: Double ConsonantsDouble ConsonantsChoose a syllable from the left box and a syllable from theright box to make a word that completes each sentence. Writethe word on the line and read the completed sentence.Hint: Each word you make will have a double consonant.First SyllablesatladbutsuddoltunfunyelSecond Syllableshapzipdenny1. A magnet willderpenlarpernext in that story?3. Bonnie needs amarker to color the sun.4. I spreadon warm toast.5. All of a, it started to rain.6. I can’t close my jacket because the7. Climb up theis broken.carefully.8. That joke was sothat I hurt myself laughing.9. Jake has oneto buy a treat.10. A mole will dig a Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.neltracta needle.2. What do you think willPhonicslowterunder the ground.171Grade 3, Unit 6

Readers GuideLesson 27NameDateREADER’S NOTEBOOKThe Power of MagnetsIndependent ReadingReader ’s G uideThe Power of MagnetsYour Magnet InventionNow is your chance to design a magnet to make yourlife easier! First, answer the questions below to makesure you understand how magnets work. Then, createyour own design.Read pages 20–21. What causes some objects to be attracted to a magnet?Read page 22. What happens if you sprinkle iron filings around a magnet?Read page 23. What is important about electromagnets?Read pages 24–25. How can you create a magnetic field in your own home?Independent Reading Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.172Grade 3, Unit 6

Lesson 27NameDateNow think of a way that you can use a magnet toimprove your life. Will you use the magnet in your homeor outside? Will you use it at school? Will you use aregular magnet or an electromagnet? Draw a pictureof your magnet and write an explanation of howit works. Be sure that you include details from the textin your design.Independent Reading Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.173R e a d e r ’ s N o t e B OO KThe Power of MagnetsIndependent ReadingGrade 3, Unit 6

Lesson 27NameDateDouble ConsonantsThe Power of MagnetsSpelling: Words withDouble ConsonantsBasic: Write the Basic Word that best completes each group.1. sheet, blanket,3. dime, quarter,4. jam, preserves,5. fox, raccoon,6. top, side,7. postcard, note,8. peach, plum,9. milk, cheese,10. zipper, snap,Challenge: Use one of the Challenge Words to writea sentence. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.Spelling WordsBasic1. jelly2. bottom3. pillow4. happen5. butter6. lesson7. cherry8. sudden9. arrow10. dollar11. hello12. rabbit13. letter14. button2. chapter, unit,SpellingREADER’S NOTEBOOK174ChallengestubbornmirrorGrade 3, Unit 6

Lesson 27NameDateWord SortREADER’S NOTEBOOKThe Power of MagnetsSpelling: Words withDouble ConsonantsWrite each Basic Word next to the correct heading.Spelling WordsBasic1. jelly2. bottom3. pillow4. happen5. butter6. lesson7. cherry8. sudden9. arrow10. dollar11. hello12. rabbit13. letter14. buttonWords with three lettersin both syllablesWords with two letters inone of the two syllablesWords with four lettersin both syllablesChallengestubbornmirrorChallenge: Add the Challenge Words to your Word Sort.Spelling Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.175Grade 3, Unit 6

Lesson 27NameREADER’S NOTEBOOKDateProofreading for SpellingThe Power of MagnetsSpelling: Words withDouble ConsonantsFind the misspelled words and circle them. Write themcorrectly on the lines below.Spelling WordsDear Jamal,Can you believe you’re getting a leter from me, atlast? I think of you a lot, especially when I see a jar of thatcharry jellie you love so much. Mom bought some theother day, and all of a suddin, I find that I love it, too!One of my front teeth fell out last week. I put thetooth under my pilloaw. The next morning, a doller showedup there. Maybe that’s enough to buy a treat for my petrabit.Hey, you’re a science buff, right? Do you happan toknow much about magnets? We had a really neat lessoneon them in science class last week, and I’d love to talk toyou about them.Well, say hellow to your family for me. Please writeback if you can. I miss you!1. jelly2. bottom3. pillow4. happen5. butter6. lesson7. cherry8. sudden9. arrow10. dollar11. hello12. rabbit13. letter14. buttonYour friend,Curtis1.5.9.2.6.10.3.7.4.8.Spelling Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.176Grade 3, Unit 6

Lesson 27NameR e a d e r ’ s N o t e B OO KDateContractions with notThe Power of MagnetsGrammarContractionsYou can put together two words and make acontraction. An apostrophe (’) takes the place of anyletter or letters that are left out. Many contractionsThinking Questionscombine a verb with not. The contraction won’t isWhich verb am Ispecial. You form it from the words will not andputting together withchange the spelling.the word not? Whichletter should I leaveout and replace withan apostrophe?It is not always easy to invent something.It isn’t always easy to invent something.Michael Faraday was not afraid to try something new.Michael Faraday wasn’t afraid to try something new.Write the contraction for the words in parentheses. Use anapostrophe in place of the underlined letter or letters.1. Electromagnetswork unless they are turned on. (do not)2. The magnet in the poemget used anymore. (does not)3. A computer’s hard drivework correctly without anelectromagnet. (will not)4. Weaware that doorbells use electromagnets. (were not)5. A blow dryer alsowork without an electromagnet.(would not)6. The poem’s speakerbeen allowed to make her brotherdisappear. (has not)7. Isee a magnetic field, but I know it exists. (cannot)8. Ibelieve all the things magnets do! (could not)Grammar Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.177Grade 3, Unit 6

Lesson 27NameDateContractions with PronounsYou can put a pronoun and a verb together tomake a contraction. An apostrophe replacesthe letter or letters that are left out.She says that she is working on a project.She says that she’s working on a project.We will see if it turns out.We’ll see if it turns out.Reader’s NotebookThe Power of MagnetsGrammar:ContractionsThinking QuestionWhen I join a pronounwith a verb, whichletters should I leaveout and replace with anapostrophe to make acontraction?Write the contraction for the words in parentheses. Use anapostrophe in place of the underlined letter or letters.1.be exciting to find out if the experiment works. (It will)2.read a lot about experiments with magnets. (We have)3. Make sureready for the science fair. (you are)4.going to enter the science fair, too. (I am)5.judge whose project is the best. (They will)6.going to be competitive. (It is)7.almost finished our project. (We have)8. She saysGrammar Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.enter the science fair next year. (she will)178Grade 3, Unit 6

Lesson 27NameReader’s notebookDateContractionsThe Power of MagnetsGrammar:Contractions1–5. Write the contraction for the words in parentheses. Use anapostrophe in place of the underlined letter or letters.1. Wegone to the science fair before. (have not)2. My familyknow how much fun it would be. (did not)3. My sisterstop playing with the projects. (would not)4. My brother5. Wewait to enter the science fair himself. (cannot)mind competing against each other. (will not)6–10. Write the contraction for the words in parentheses. Use anapostrophe in place of the underlined letter or letters.6.going to love the science fair. (You are)7. My teacher sayswon a prize. (I have)8.give it to me later. (She will)9.hang in my bedroom. (It will)10.the best prize I ever won. (It is)Grammar Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.179Grade 3, Unit 6

Lesson 27NameReader’s NotebookDateWriting Proper NounsThe Power of MagnetsGrammar: Spiral Review A proper noun always begins with a capital letter. Days, months, holidays, historical periods, and specialevents are proper nouns. The first, last, and important words in a book title arecapitalized. Book titles are underlined.Proper Nounsdaymonthholidaybook titleWednesdayMarchThanksgivingThe GiverActivity: Write all proper nouns and book titles from eachsentence correctly.1. The electricity went off last friday.2. I read my favorite book, the dark forest, with a flashlight.3. We saved a lot of electricity in april.4. My book report on Michael Faraday is due after memorialday.5. I would rather learn about world war II than aboutelectricity.6. My sister is writing a book called when the lights go out.Grammar Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.180Grade 3, Unit 6

Lesson 27NameDateConventions: ProofreadingSentences Without CorrectContractionsReader’s NotebookThe Power of MagnetsGrammar:Connect to WritingSentences with CorrectContractionsShes making her project.She’s making her project.The project is’nt too difficult.The project isn’t too difficult.We have’t decided what we’illmake.We haven’t decided what we’llmake.Proofread the paragraphs. Find and underline five mistakes inthe spelling of contractions. Write the correct sentences on thelines below.Theyr’e starting to organize this year’s science fair. Icann’t miss it this time! Last year I was’nt able to get aproject done in time. This year I’m going to make sure I do.Iv’e heard the fairs are a lot of fun. You get to see all theprojects other people have worked on. I would’nt want tomiss that.1.2.3.4.5.Grammar Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.181Grade 3, Unit 6

Lesson 27NameDateFocus Trait: IdeasReader’s NotebookThe Power of MagnetsWriting: IdeasRead each problem and solution. Add details to elaborate. Explain howthe problem was solved and how the solution works. Use informationfrom “The Power of Magnets.”1.Problem: Kaylie dropped a box of pins.Solution: She used a magnet.Details:2.Problem: The remote control car does not work.Solution: We put a battery in it.Details:3.Problem: A junkyard owner needs to move a car.Solution: He flips a switch.Details:4.Problem: Michael Faraday wanted to produce electricity.Solution: He moved a magnet through a coil of wire.Details:Writing Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.182Grade 3, Unit 6

Lesson 28NameReader’s NotebookDateWords with ough, aughRead each word in the box. Say the sound that ough or aughstands for. Then write the word in the chart under the correctcategory.Becoming AnythingHe Wants to BePhonics: Words withough and aughWord Bankboughtbroughtough rhymeswith pawcaughtdaughterfoughtlaughnaughtyoughtough rhymes withpuffPhonics Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.183roughsoughtaugh rhymes withpawtaughtthoughtaugh rhymeswith staffGrade 3, Unit 6

Readers GuideLesson 28NameDateREADER’S NOTEBOOKBecoming AnythingHe Wants to BeIndependent ReadingReader ’s G uideBecoming Anything He Wants to BeCreate a Captioned IllustrationThis story of Erik Weihenmayer is told with photographsthat have captions. The photographs help us see whatErik can do, and the captions help us understand thephotographs. Let’s take a closer look.Look at page 35. What does the caption let you know about thephotograph on this page?Look at page 37. What does the caption tell you about thephotograph on this page?Look at page 38. In the first photograph, which of the bike ridersis Erik? How do you know?The caption for the second paragraph tells us why this story isimportant for everybody. Why is it important?Independent Reading Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.184Grade 3, Unit 6

Lesson 28NameDateErik Weihenmayer achieved amazing things. Howhave his achievements inspired you? What is onething you would like to do but think you cannot do?Draw an illustration of yourself doing this difficult thing.Write a caption that explains what you are doing.Independent Reading Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.185READER’S NOTEBOOKBecoming Anything HeWants to BeIndependent ReadingGrade 3, Unit 6

Lesson 28NameReader’s NotebookDateBecoming AnythingHe Wants to BeSpelling: Words withough and aughWords with ough and aughBasic: Write the Basic Word that completes each sentence.1. A mother and herhad a problem.2. The little girl hada bad cold.3. Every day, the child’sgrew worse.4. Her sore throat made her voiceand scratchy.5. The girl couldn’t sleepthe night.6. The mother knew shegirl to a doctor.to take the7. They didn’t havepay the bill.money, though, to8. Then the motherof something.9. Some of her neighbors hada free clinic set up nearby.to haveSpelling WordsBasic1. taught2. thought3. rough4. laugh5. bought6. cough7. ought8. caught9. fought10. daughter11. tough12. through13. enough14. broughtChallengesoughtnaughty10. She picked up her daughter andher to the clinic.Challenge: Write a sentence about a problem youhad and how you solved it. Use both Challenge Words.Spelling Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.186Grade 3, Unit 6

Lesson 28NameDateREADER’S NOTEBOOKBecoming AnythingHe Wants to BeSpelling: Words withough and aughWord SortWrite each Basic Word beside the correct heading.Spelling WordsBasic1. taught2. thought3. rough4. laugh5. bought6. cough7. ought8. caught9. fought10. daughter11. tough12. through13. enough14. broughtWords in which the lettersgh are not pronouncedChallengesoughtnaughtyWords in which the lettersgh are pronounced /f/Challenge: Add the Challenge Words to your Word Sort.Spelling Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.187Grade 3, Unit 6

Lesson 28NameReader’s NotebookDateBecoming AnythingHe Wants to BeSpelling: Words withough and aughProofreading for SpellingFind the misspelled words and circle them. Write themcorrectly on the lines below.Spelling WordsNot long ago, our old dog, Bella, stopped comingwhen we called her. At first, we thouht she just wantedto show us who was boss. After all the training she’dhad, though, she aught to know better.Then the vet found Bella’s problem: she had losther hearing. We worried that Bella would have a tufftime in a silent world. That sweet girl has tawght us athing or two!First, we baught a book about living with a deafdog. We read throogh it carefully. We learned to talkto Bella with body signals, not our voices. In a few days,using an arm to beckon her brout her to us right away.When it was time for a walk, we held up a leash for herto see. That was ennough to get her racing to the door!Today, we luagh to think we ever worried aboutBella. She fougt to overcome her problem, and she’s aneven more amazing dog now.1.5.8.2.6.9.3.7.10.1. taught2. thought3. rough4. laugh5. bought6. cough7. ought8. caught9. fought10. daughter11. tough12. through13. enough14. brought4.Spelling Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.188Grade 3, Unit 6

Lesson 28NameDateReader’s NotebookBecoming AnythingHe Wants to BeGrammar: Commas in SentencesCommas in a Series A series is a list of three or more words togetherin a sentence. Use a comma to separate the words in a series.It was cold, wet, and windy when heclimbed the mountain.Thinking QuestionIs there a list ofthree or more wordsin the sentence?Activity: Rewrite each sentence correctly. Add commas wherethey are needed.1. He had a big breakfast of eggs toast and orange juice.2. She packed up the tent backpack and sleeping bag.3. The weather was cold windy and sunny.4. They wore sunglasses hats and gloves.5. Along the path they saw deer raccoons and a fox.6. They would tell their story to Anna Julio and Wade.Grammar Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.189Grade 3, Unit 6

Lesson 28NameDateCommas with IntroductoryWords Use a comma after the introductory words well, yes,and no. Use a comma after order words such as first,second, next, and finally. Do not use a comma after then.Yes, I might want to try climbing one day.Reader’s NotebookBecoming AnythingHe Wants to BeGrammar: Commas in SentencesThinking QuestionIs there an introductoryor order word in thesentence?Rewrite these sentences correctly. Add commas where they are needed.1. First let’s have some lunch.2. Yes that is a very good idea.3. No I did not remember to fill the water bottles.4. Well we will have to look for a water fountain.5. Yes I can show you how to pack away the blanket.6. First fold it neatly in half and then in half again.7. Next smooth out any wrinkles.8. Finally roll the blanket carefully, starting at one of the short ends.Grammar Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.190Grade 3, Unit 6

Lesson 28NameDateCommas in SentencesREADER’S NOTEBOOKBecoming AnythingHe Wants to BeGrammar: Commas in SentencesRead each pair of sentences. Fill in the circle next to thesentence that uses correct punctuation.1.2.3.4.5.AClimbers can be tall, short, young, or old.BClimbers can be tall short, young or, old.AYes, climbing is one of my hobbies.BYes climbing is one of my hobbies.AWell reaching, a goal takes lots of hard work.BWell, reaching a goal takes lots of hard work.AShe used paper, markers, and scissors to draw her plan.BShe used paper, markers, and scissors, to draw her plan.AFirst, you have to decide if you are willing to do the work.BFirst you have to decide if you are willing to do the work.Grammar Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.191Grade 3, Unit 6

Lesson 28NameReader’s NotebookDateBecoming AnythingHe Wants to BeGrammar: Spiral ReviewWriting Abbreviations An abbreviation is a short way to write a word. Mostabbreviations begin with a capital letter and end with aperiod.AbbreviationsSundayMondaySeptembertitle for any womantitle for married womanstreetavenueSun.Mon.Sept.Ms.Mrs.St.Ave.1–10 Write each abbreviation correctly.1. October2. avenue3. Tuesday4. doctor Smith5. Thursday6. mister Hill7. December8. April9. mister Adams10. streetGrammar Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.192Grade 3, Unit 6

Lesson 28NameReader’s NotebookDateBecoming AnythingHe Wants to BeGrammar: Connect to WritingSentence Fluency:Combining Words to Form a SeriesChoppy SentencesHe needs rope for climbing. He alsoneeds gloves for climbing. He needsboots for climbing.Choppy SentencesHe wrestles. He scuba dives. He ridesa bike.Combined Nouns to Make a SeriesHe needs rope, gloves, and bootsfor climbing.Combined Predicates to Make a SeriesHe wrestles, scuba dives, andrides a bike.Activity: Combine each group of sentences by forming aseries of nouns, verbs, or phrases. Write the new sentence onthe lines. Add commas where necessary.1. Erik climbs walls. He climbs mountains. He also climbshills.2. Jose wants to share his success with his parents. He wants to shareit with his friends. He wants to share his success with his neighbors.3. Anika never gave up. She never complained. She never made excuses.4. Fong practiced in the morning. He practiced at night. He practicedon the weekend.Grammar Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.193Grade 3, Unit 6

Lesson 28NameDateFocus Trait: Word ChoiceReader’s NotebookBecoming AnythingHe Wants to BeWriting: Word ChoiceRead each step of the instructions for starting a rock collection.Rewrite the step with exact words and details to give moreinformation.1. Step: Get a box.With Exact Words and Details:2. Step: Dig up some rocks.With Exact Words and Details:3. Step: Clean the rocks.With Exact Words and Details:4. Step: Put them away.With Exact Words and Details:5. Step: Read about the rocks.With Exact Words and Details:Writing Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.194Grade 3, Unit 6

Lesson 29NameReader’s NotebookDateWords Ending in -er or-leA New Team of HeroesPhonics: Words Ending in-er or-leRead the words in the box. Then choose the word that bestmatches each clue.Word mermembersupper1. a red fruit that is sweet to eat2. someone who belongs to agroup3. a meal you eat late in the day4. not big; small5. a person who grows food crops6. a toy that a baby shakes7. in between the first and the last8. the opposite of worse9. the opposite of winter10. a fight or something difficultPhonics Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.195Grade 3, Unit 6

Readers GuideLesson 29NameDateR e a d e r ’ s N o t e B OO KA New Team of HeroesIndependent ReadingReader ’s G uideA New Team of HeroesThe Story of the GameChoose a character to tell about the soccer game inhis or her own words. First, review the play toremember important details.Read pages 48–50. What can we tell about Carla so far?What do we learn about Lauren?How does Hiro feel about Carla?How does Gayle feel about Carla?Read pages 51–52. What can we tell about Manny?Independent Reading Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.196Grade 3, Unit

Spelling: Words with VCCV Pattern Word Sort Write each Basic Word next to the correct heading. Vowel a in rst syllable Vowel e in rst syllable Vowel i in rst syllable Vowel o in rst syllable Vowel u in rst syllable Challenge: Add the Challenge Words to your Word Sort. Basic 1. person 2. helmet 3. until 4. carpet 5. Monday 6 .

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A Tanka poem has 31 syllables arranged as follows: Line 1 – 5 syllables Line 2 – 7 syllables Line 3 – 5 syllables Line 4 – 7 syllables Line 5 – 7 syllables Your task today is to write a Tanka poem in response to this week’s picture. e.g. (the words with more than one syllable

1 Syllable 2 Syllables 3 Syllables 4 Syllables 5 Syllables dog fountain dinosaur caterpillar electricity jug kennel Inuit (Eskimo) rhinoceros hippopotamus clown necklace motorbike television corrugated iron bird bucket violin vacuum cleaner refrigerator church surfer parachute Australia combine harvester General

Mar 11, 2019 · Guidelines for #5: Tanka The Tanka poem is very similar to haiku but Tanka poems have more syllables and it uses simile, metaphor and personification. The poem consists of 5 lines. Line 1 – 5 syllables, line 2 – 7 syllables, line 3 – 5 syllables, line 4 – 7 syllables, line 5

Syllable Segmenting Syllable Blending Onset-Rime Blending Claps syllables in 2 syllable words Tells how many syllables in a word Claps 3 syllables in a word. Says the word when given two syllables Blends 3 syllable words Blends onset and rime to make a word Onset-Rime

Syllables and Affixes - Early Group 8: Term 3 2019, Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7 Week 8 Week 9 Week 10 "Long - i Patterns in Accented Syllables" (Sort 18) Long - o Patterns in Accented Syllables" (Sort 19) "Long - u Patterns in Accented Syllables" (Sort 20) "

At Your Name Name above All Names Your Name Namesake Blessed Be the Name I Will Change Your Name Hymns Something about That Name His Name Is Wonderful Precious Name He Knows My Name I Have Called You by Name Blessed Be the Name Glorify Thy Name All Hail the Power of Jesus’ Name Jesus Is the Sweetest Name I Know Take the Name of Jesus

UnIT 4 The Jazz articulation Rule—Da and aH syllables GOALS Students discover and work to memorize the Jazz Articulation Rule so they have a clear understanding of this important aspect of jazz articulation. Students can review and practice with the most common jazz syllables, DA and AH, and understand the difference between these two syllables.