2018-2019 SA Freelance Media Industry And Rates Report

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SA FREELANCE MEDIA INDUSTRY AND RATES REPORT 2018/2019

1 Introduction Independence. Flexibility. Entrepreneurship. Leaps in technology. The future of work. The freelance revolution began a number of years ago and is accelerating at great speed, with independent professionals – freelancers – changing the way we connect, create and collaborate the world over. The Southern African Freelancers’ Association (SAFREA) hopes that as companies start to more fully understand the bottom-line benefit of the gig economy and increase their utilisation of freelancers’ services, they begin to realise and fairly remunerate the incredible value that freelance media and communications professionals offer their businesses in 2019 and beyond. According to respondents of the 2018/2019 SA Freelance Media Industry & Rates Survey, freelancing is a choice and one made for a multitude of reasons, including flexibility, freedom to choose projects and clients, and as a way to supplement income. Conversely, the biggest challenges facing freelancers include low rates, poor client payment practices, and exploitation by clients with a ‘take it or leave it’ attitude. SAFREA works to raise the professional standing of freelancers in the media and communications industry and promotes professional standards and ethical conduct by both freelancers and their clients. In this report, we delve a little deeper into the motivations and composition of the industry to identify the challenges that impact our fellow freelancers and the exciting opportunities that exist for creative entrepreneurs in Southern Africa. Our rates indicator has become known as one of the most reliable benchmarking tools in the media and communications industry. It not only guides freelancers but encourages their clients to follow fair standards of remuneration for the professionals to whom they entrust their business story. These rates are made public as such and do not constitute any form of control or pricing policy. Pricing is at all times agreed directly between freelancers and their customers, in line with the freelancer’s experience and qualifications, and availability of client budgets. To avoid any misunderstandings, SAFREA recommends that a written agreement stating full terms and conditions is entered into prior to commencement of any and all work. This report is the third of its kind for SAFREA. The 2018/2019 survey was completed by a total of 393 respondents, between 28 January and 28 February 2019, comprising both SAFREA members and nonmembers. Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

2 Highlights Women run the world of freelancing with more than 77% female respondents. Freelancing has no age limit; respondents range in age from 19 to 80. There are a number of new freelancers on the scene, with nearly 40% of respondents indicating that they have only been freelancing for the last five years. Wordsmiths dominant the freelance landscape, specifically editors, journalists and copywriters. Freelancers are highly qualified and experienced; 27,99% hold a Bachelor’s Degree and 25,45% hold a post-graduate qualification (e.g. Honours). The majority of respondents also have over 10 years of experience in their primary and secondary specialties. More than a third of respondents earn less than R10 000 per month; this despite freelancing being respondents’ primary source of income. Just over a quarter of respondents (27,99%) earn between R11 000 and R20 000 a month. Our rates categories continue to expand. This year, we added script writing in more detail, additional editing categories, and South African Sign Language (SASL) interpreting. A number of rates have changed since the 2017/2018 report (Thekiso & Mapaling, 2018), with ranges widening to incorporate rates on the higher and lower end of the scale. Three out of four freelancers work in the corporate/private sector and the majority of respondents work in print and/or online. Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

3 General Information Location Most freelancers are based in Gauteng (42,49%) and the Western Cape (36,64%), followed by KwaZulu-Natal (7,38%). Age Freelancing attracts people of all ages – from 19 to 80 years old! While the majority of freelancers fall in the 31 to 60 age bracket, there are significant younger and older contingents to bolster the ranks. Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

4 Gender Women dominate the freelance sector as more than 77% of respondents are female. The leading reasons for choosing freelancing as a career – flexibility and freedom – tie in with what largely appears to remain a woman’s duty of balancing family and work responsibilities. Freelancing therefore enables female media and communications professionals to do the work they love in a way that suits their lifestyle and personal circumstances. The Quarterly Labour Force Survey released by Statistics South Africa (Statistics South Africa, 2018a) reveals that women accounted for less than half of total employment (43,8%) in the second quarter of 2018. According to Stats SA’s expanded definition of unemployment, the rate of unemployment amongst women was 7,5% higher than that of males. Perhaps it makes a little more sense then why so many more women choose to freelance and carve out a career for themselves outside of the formal employment sector. Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

5 Education Freelancers are highly-educated, highly-skilled professionals who deserve to be treated – and paid – accordingly. 110 respondents (27,99%) hold Bachelor’s Degrees and 100 (25,45%) have obtained Honours or equivalent post-graduate qualifications. Primary Specialty & Years of Experience Most of the respondents engage in some form of writing and editing, including sub-editing, journalism, copywriting, public relations and communications. More than 50% of respondents have between six and 20 years of experience in their primary specialty. Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

6 Secondary Specialty & Years of Experience Many freelancers offer multiple, complementary professional services. In addition to their primary specialty, respondents are specialists in a variety of writing and editing services, again with the majority of respondents (29,01%) having up to 20 years’ experience in their secondary specialty. Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

7 Overall Freelance Experience An interesting new insight this year is that 39,19% of respondents have been freelancing for fewer than five years. Over a quarter of respondents (27,99%) have been freelancing for between 6 – 10 years, with 20,87% having successfully freelanced for up to 20 years. Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

8 Types of Clients & Fields of Work We asked respondents to identify their most regular clients and fields of work. Nearly three-quarters of freelancers find work in the corporate/private sector, specifically in the print and digital/online fields. In a follow-up question, we asked what other fields respondents work in, and print and digital/online once again came out tops. Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

9 Marketing Platforms In line with the fact that the majority of freelancers work in the digital/online space, it makes sense that social media is considered an important marketing tool for creative entrepreneurs. 31,61% of respondents cite Facebook as their primary marketing platform, followed by LinkedIn (21,61%) and Instagram (13,39%). Interestingly, 15,48% respondents indicate that they do not use any of the platforms listed for marketing purposes. This is an opportunity for freelancers just waiting to be mined. Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

10 Average Monthly Income This is one of the most crucial – and alarming – insights of the entire report. For the third year running, most respondents (34,61%) report that they earn less than R10 000.00 per month. This is followed by 27,99% of respondents who earn between R11 000.00 and R20 000.00 per month and 16,79% who earn up to R30 000.00. Less than 2% of respondents earn above R70 000.00 each month. Over 80% of respondents indicate that freelancing is their primary source of income. A review of the Statistics South Africa (Stats SA) Quarterly Employment Statistics for the third quarter of 2018 (Statistics South Africa, 2018b) reveals that in August 2018, average monthly earnings for all formal non-agricultural sector employees rose by R697 to R20 860. Over the past 12 months, average monthly earnings have increased by 5,0%. The current average freelancer income of R10 000.00 is clearly well below par, with future improvements only possible if clients show a willingness to pay fair and reasonable rates, and freelancers refuse to take on lower-than-acceptable paying work. Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

11 Understanding the Freelancer Why are you a freelancer? There are many reasons that media and communications professionals choose to freelance. The most popular reasons are as follows: Supplement income (as full-time employees or retirees) Flexibility Freedom (autonomy) to choose projects and clients Entrepreneurship Multi-disciplinary nature of freelancing - 23,50% - 22,22% - 19,66% - 11,97% - 10,26% Additional reasons included under ‘Other’ are intellectual stimulation, complementing a full-time job, and a genuine love for the commissioned work. Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

12 What are your concerns/challenges within the freelance industry? Freelancers face a number of challenges, not just from clients but fierce competition from fellow freelancers and by virtue of operating in the Southern African media and communications landscape as well. The top concerns or challenges, according to the 2018/2019 respondents are as follows: Rates (in general) Lack of benefits associated with a full-time position (e.g. medical aid, pension) Payment (including non-payment and late payment) A lack of understanding freelancing as a business Exploitation of freelancers by clients with a ‘take it or leave it’ attitude - 19,25% - 11,82% - 11,61% - 11,25% - 10,63% Additional challenges listed under ‘Other’ include insecurity of ongoing work, irregular income, access to training, and limited own marketing efforts. Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

13 Industry organisation membership Freelancing can be lonely. One of the best ways to curb the isolation is to join an industry organisation that fosters a sense of community amongst like-minded professionals and assists freelancers with access to training, networking and collaborating regarding job opportunities. 26,96% of respondents belong to the SAFREA, while 15,71% hold Professional Editors’ Guild (PEG) membership. Respondents also list other industry organisation membership under ‘Other’ including: South African Guild of Editors (SAGE), South African Science Journalists’ Association (SASJA), and Sisters Working in Film and Television (SWIFT). Interestingly, 29,30% of respondents say that they do not belong to any organisation at all. This indicates a very real marketing and recruitment opportunity for SAFREA and the like. Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

14 Rates Trends This section focuses on the pricing strategies that freelancers employ for various disciplines. It is merely a benchmark and individuals should continue to use the options that work best for their business. General It seems that the most popular charging method is per hour – 18% of respondents always charge this way and 54% sometimes invoice on an hourly basis. With wordsmiths dominating the freelance landscape in Southern Africa, it is not surprising that charging per word is also popular with 21% (always) and 39% (sometimes) opting for this charging method. Depending on a freelancer’s field, charging per half- or full-day may be the most effective pricing strategy. 29% of respondents sometimes charge a half-day rate and 36% sometimes charge for a full day. A flat rate or retainer fee is another charging method – 10% always charge this way and 60% sometimes choose to quote and invoice this way. Per word How often do you charge per word? 21% 40% Always Sometimes Never 39% Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

15 Per hour How often do you charge per hour? 18% 28% Always Sometimes Never 54% Per half day How often do you charge per half-day? 2% 29% Always 69% Sometimes Never Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

16 Per full day How often do you charge per full-day? 10% 54% 36% Always Sometimes Never Retainer/Flat rate How often do you charge per retainer/flat rate? 10% 30% Always Sometimes 60% Never Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

17 How often do you accept a job that is negotiated well below your standard fee? 65,14% of respondents admit to accepting a job well below their standard fee while 29,77% say they never do. 5,09% of respondents always accept low-paying jobs. How often do you accept a job that is negotiated well below your standard fee? 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Always Sometimes Always Sometimes Never Never According to respondents, there are a number of reasons for agreeing to a lower rate: “I need the money.” “The availability of work, the feeling of inexperience, the only fee the client is offering, and no negotiation whatsoever.” “It might be a job that opens doors; might be a cause close to my heart; might be a favour for a friend.” “I work closely with many students and I feel it is more important for me to assist them in bettering themselves through education rather than charging them so much that they are even further indebted in their pursuit.” “It depends on the cause. If it’s sometime I believe in and they really can’t pay the full fee then we can compromise.” “I lack knowledge on how to structure my fees.” “If it is a big project that will guarantee an income over a long period, I will at times accept.” “To build my brand and reputation.” “Because they might commission someone who is willing to go lower instead of me and then I’ll miss out on the work.” Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

18 We now look at each media and communications field covered by the 2018/2019 survey in detail. ‘Not applicable’ responses have been excluded from the results. Writing/Content Development Per word (36%) is the most popular charging method in the writing/content development sector, followed by retainer/flat rate (31%) and per hour (25%). Writing/Content Development 8% 36% 31% 25% Per word Per hour Retainer/flat rate Other Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

19 Script writing Script writers tend to charge based on a retainer/flat rate (30%), followed by per episode (24%) and per hour (21%). Script writing 8% 17% 21% 30% 24% Per word Per hour Per episode Retainer/flat rate Other Advertising Freelancers who work in advertising tend to charge per hour (47%) or retainer/flat rate (32%). Advertising 12% 9% 32% 47% Per word Per hour Retainer/flat rate Other Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

20 PR/Communications PR/Communications specialists charge per hour (38%) or retainer/flat rate (35%). Public Relations and Communications 5% 22% 35% 38% Per word Per hour Retainer/flat rate Other Online Freelancers who work in the online space tend to use a mix of retainer/flat rate (32%), per hour (31%) and per word (29%). Online 8% 29% 32% 31% Per word Per hour Retainer/flat rate Other Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

21 Social media Social media specialists usually charge per hour (49%). 30% choose to charge per social media post. Social media 15% 30% 6% 49% Per post Per word Per hour Other Editing In a job where every word counts, it is not surprising that most editors charge on a per word basis (43%). This is followed by a per hour rate (32%) and per page (15%). Editing 10% 43% 32% 15% Per word Per page Per hour Other Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

22 Transcription Transcription specialists tend to charge on an hourly basis (54%). Transcription 16% 30% 54% Per word Per hour Other Translation Translation services will usually be billed on a per word basis (77%). Translation 8% 15% 77% Per word Per hour Other Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

23 Interpreting Those who work in the interpreting sector tend to charge per hour (52%). Interpreting 17% 52% 31% Per hour Project fee Other Photography Photographers tend to use a range of charging methods, but the most popular remains per hour (40%), followed by per image (22%) and per full-day (18%). Photography 15% 22% 18% 5% 40% Per image Per hour Half-day Full-day Other Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

24 Videography The majority (43%) of videographers prefer to work on a project fee basis, followed by a full-day rate (28%) and an hourly fee (20%). Videography 9% 20% 0% 43% 28% Per hour Half-day Full-day Project fee Other Workshops/Training Freelancers who work in the workshops/training sector usually charge a project fee (46%) or a full-day rate (24%) Workshop/Training 4% 19% 7% 46% 24% Per hour Half-day Full-day Project fee Other Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

25 Graphic design Graphic designers tend to charge on an hourly basis (44%) or using a project fee (42%). Graphic Design 12% 44% 42% 2% Per hour Half-day Full-day 0% Project fee Other Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

26 Rates Indicator This section gives an indication of the average price range that the respondents charge for various disciplines and focus areas. It is merely a benchmark and individuals should continue to use the options that work best for them and their business. We tracked specific rates, based on the 2017/2018 report (Thekiso & Mapaling, 2018), as well as additional baseline input from our industry partners. All stated rates exclude VAT. WRITING/CONTENT DEVELOPMENT What do you charge for? Type Magazines Per word R3.00 - R4.00 Per hour R400.00 - R500.00 Newspapers R2.00 - R3.00 R400.00 - R500.00 Corporate content R2.00 - R4.00 R400.00 - R600.00 Technical/specialist content R2.00 - R4.00 R400.00 - R700.00 Annual reports R2.00 - R3.00 R450.00 - R550.00 Government documents R2.00 - R3.00 R450.00 - R650.00 Textbooks R1.50 - R2.00 R350.00 - R500.00 Novels/books R0.50 - R2.00 R300.00 - R400.00 Ghost writing R4.50 - R7.50 R450.00 - R550.00 Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

27 SCRIPT WRITING What do you charge for? Type Per word Script writing R2.00 - R3.50 (General – television) Head writer (Long* running series/soaps/telenovelas) Per hour R500.00 - R650.00 Other * * R40,000.00 R90,000.00 per month Storyliner (Long-running * series/soaps/telenovelas) * Story editor (Longrunning series/soaps/telenovelas) Script editor (Longrunning series/soaps/telenovelas) Researcher (Longrunning series/soaps/telenovelas) Script writing (General – corporate) Corporate AV script writing with research supplied Corporate AV script writing with writer doing research Specialty AV script writing which requires project expertise * * * * * * R5 000.00 R7 000.00 per episode R1 900.00 R3 300.00 per episode R1 900.00 R3 300.00 per episode R1 200.00 R4 400.00 per day R3.50 - R5.00 R550.00 - R700.00 * * * * * * * Educational AV script writing * * R350.00 - R550.00 per minute (for 15 minutes or less) R500.00 - R750.00 per minute (for 15 minutes or less) R1,500.00 R2,000.00 per minute (for 15 minutes or less) R750.00 R1,750.00 per minute (for 15 minutes or less) *Rate not tracked / Not applicable Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

28 ADVERTISING What do you charge for? Type Marketing material (brochures, adverts, etc.) Advertorial Per word R2.00 - R3.00 Per hour R450.00 - R550.00 R3.00 - R4.00 R500.00 - R600.00 Copywriting R3.00 - R4.00 R450.00 - R550.00 PUBLIC RELATIONS & COMMUNICATIONS What do you charge for? Type Media release writing Strategy development Per word R2.00 - R3.00 Per hour R450.00 - R550.00 R3.00 - R4.00 R550.00 - R 1 200.00 Speech writing R3.00 - R4.00 R500.00 - R600.00 Media relations R3.00 - R3.50 R450.00 - R550.00 Flat rate R1 500.00 R2 000.00 * R1 500.00 R2 000.00 * *Rate not tracked / Not applicable Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

29 ONLINE What do you charge for? Type Website content Per word R1.50 - R3.50 Per hour R450.00 - R550.00 Online consumer content R2.00 - R2.50 R400.00 - R500.00 SEO content R1.50 - R3.50 R450.00 - R550.00 Consumer/journalism blog content Content marketing R2.50 - R3.00 R400.00 - R500.00 R2.50 - R3.00 R450.00 - R550.00 Web-based content R2.50 - R3.00 R450.00 - R550.00 Email marketing content R2.50 - R3.00 R450.00 - R550.00 SOCIAL MEDIA What do you charge for? Type Social media content creation Social media management/coordination Social media strategy development Per post R200.00 - R350.00 Per word R2.50 - R3.00 Per hour R350.00 - R450.00 * * R400.00 - R500.00 * * R500.00 - R550.00 *Rate not tracked / Not applicable Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

30 GENERAL EDITING What do you charge for? Type General copy-editing (light) General copy-editing (medium) General copy-editing (heavy) Substantive/structural editing Developmental editing Proofreading Copy/sub-editing Reference checking Per word R0.20 - R1.20 Per page R50.00 - R100.00 Per hour R350.00 - R550.00 R0.20 - R1.50 R50.00 - R100.00 R350.00 - R550.00 R0.40 - R2.00 R50.00 - R150.00 R350.00 - R550.00 R0.35 - R2.00 R150.00 - R200.00 R400.00 - R600.00 R0.50 - R1.00 R150.00 - R200.00 R350.00 - R750.00 R0.20 - R0.55 R0.20 - R1.80 * R30.00 - R170.00 R90.00 - R120.00 R75.00 - R225.00 R300.00 - R500.00 R350.00 - R550.00 R300.00 - R400.00 *Rate not tracked / Not applicable SPECIFIC EDITING What do you charge for? Type Magazines Per word R0.20 - R1.50 Per page R45.00 - R65.00 Per hour R350.00 - R450.00 Newspapers R0.50 - R1.00 R50.00 - R100.00 R300.00 - R400.00 Academic theses R0.20 - R1.50 R45.00 - R65.00 R200.00 - R600.00 Corporate content R3.00 - R5.00 R150.00 - R200.00 R450.00 - R550.00 Technical/Specialist content Government documents Textbooks R0.20 - R1.50 R35.00 - R150.00 R450.00 - R550.00 R0.40 - R1.50 R100.00 - R200.00 R400.00 - R500.00 R0.20 - R0.50 R50.00 - R100.00 R350.00 - R550.00 Fiction R0.20 - R0.50 R50.00 - R100.00 R300.00 - R500.00 Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

31 DOCUMENT FORMATTING What do you charge for? Type Academic Per word R0.20 - R0.50 Per page R25.00 - R125.00 Per hour R250.00 - R400.00 General R0.20 - R0.50 * R250.00 - R450.00 Per word R0.15 - R0.65 Per page R250.00 - R400.00 Per hour R400.00 - R500.00 R0.15 - R0.65 R125.00 - R275.00 R400.00 - R500.00 *Rate not tracked / Not applicable LAYOUT COORDINATION What do you charge for? Type Corporate newsletters Magazines TRANSCRIPTION What do you charge for? Type Transcription Per word R1.50 - R2.50 Per hour R400.00 - R550.00 Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

32 TRANSLATION What do you charge for? Type Between English and Afrikaans Per word R0.50 - R1.00 Between English and an official African language Between English and major world languages Between English and less common world languages Sworn translation Specialised translation (e.g. financial, legal, highly technical or scientific) R0.50 - R2.00 R0.50 - R2.00 R0.50 - R2.00 R1.00 - R2.50 R1.00 - R2.50 INTERPRETING What do you charge for? Type Between English and Afrikaans Between English and an official African language Between English and major world languages Between English and less common world languages Between English and South African Sign Language (SASL) Per hour R350.00 - R450.00 R400.00 - R500.00 R400.00 - R500.00 R450.00 - R550.00 R400.00 - R600.00 Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

33 PHOTOGRAPHY Type Product, advertising, branding, interiors, architectural Event photography Per image R200.00 R450.00 Per hour R800.00 R1 000.00 Half-day R3 000.00 R5 000.00 Full-day R5 000.00 R8 000.00 R50.00 R250.00 R850.00 R1 500.00 R3 000.00 R5 000.00 R4 500.00 R7 500.00 Advertorial, editorial, modelling Wedding R600.00 R3 200.00 R800.00 R1 500.00 R3 000.00 R5 000.00 R5 000.00 R8 000.00 R50.00 R100.00 R600.00 R1 200.00 R4 000.00 R7 000.00 R7 000.00 R12 000.00 Media houses, newspapers R200.00 R700.00 R400.00 R650.00 R1 750.00 R3 250.00 R3 250.00 R5 750.00 Per image R100.00 R200.00 Per hour R300.00 R500.00 Half-day R1 000.00 R3 000.00 Full-day R1 500.00 R3 500.00 R1.50 - R4.50 per MB R100.00 R170.00 R50.00 R175.00 * * * * * PHOTOGRAPHY/POST-PRODUCTION What do you charge for? Type Postproduction, retouching Dropbox / FTP Digital capture fee processed *Rate not tracked / Not applicable Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

34 VIDEOGRAPHY Type Camera with professional sound, proper lighting and stabilised shots, with no edits required Post-production, video editing Per hour R1 500.00 R3 500.00 Half-day R2 500.00 R4 500.00 Full-day R3 500.00 R6 500.00 R400.00 - R600.00 * R2 500.00 R4 500.00 Per hour R450.00 - R850.00 Half-day R3 500.00 R6 500.00 Full-day R5 000.00 R12 000.00 R450.00 - R750.00 * * *Rate not tracked / Not applicable WORKSHOPS/TRAINING What do you charge for? Type Facilitating workshops/training sessions Module/content creation *Rate not tracked / Not applicable Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

35 GRAPHIC DESIGN What do you charge for? Type General graphic design Logo design Per hour R350.00 - R550.00 Creating visual concepts Presenting design concepts Original images R200.00 - R800.00 Illustrations R300.00 - R800.00 Incorporating changes recommended by clients or art directors into final designs Reviewing designs for errors before printing or publishing them Transforming statistical data into visual graphics and diagrams R250.00 - R450.00 R1 000.00 R1 800.00 Full-day R2 000.00 R5 000.00 R2 250.00 R5 750.00 R1 000.00 R5 000.00 R2 250.00 R3 750.00 R2 000.00 R5 000.00 R2 250.00 R4 250.00 R2 250.00 R3 750.00. R350.00 - R550.00 R1 000.00 R1 800.00 R2 250.00 R3 750.00 R350.00 - R650.00 R1 200.00 R1 600.00 R2 250.00 R3 750.00 R300.00 - R500.00 R300.00 - R500.00 R300.00 - R500.00 Half-day R1 000.00 R2 000.00 R2 500.00 R3 500.00 R1 100.00 R1 800.00 R1 250.00 R1 950.00 R1 200.00 R1 700.00 * *Rate not tracked / Not applicable Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019 SA freelance media industry and rates report. Johannesburg, South Africa: SAFREA.

36 GRAPHIC DESIGN/LAYOUT & PRODUCTION What do you charge for? Type Advertisements Per hour R300.00 - R600.00 Brochures R300.00 - R600.00 Magazines R350.00 - R550.00 Corporate reports R350.00 - R650.00 Half-day R1 200.00 R1 600.00 R1 200.00 R1 600.00 R 1 000.00 R 1 800.00 R1 200.00 R2 000.00 Full-day R2 000.00 R3 400.00 R2 000.00 R3 400.00 R2 250.00 R4 750.00 R2 250.00 R3 750.00 Please note that this rates report is not prescriptive and aims to provide an overview of current rates trends. It should be viewed as a benchmarking guide and freelancers should factor in their experience, expertise, client’s budget and the creative field in question when setting their individual rates. Dubber, L., & Mapaling, C. (2019). 2018-2019

According to respondents of the 2018/2019 SA Freelance Media Industry & Rates Survey, freelancing is a choice and one made for a multitude of reasons, including flexibility, freedom to choose projects and clients, and as a way to supplement income. Conversely, the biggest challenges facing freelancers

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Further notes on freelance rates: Charging per word, per hour or per project: The freelancer and freelance employer should decide whether charging per word, per hour or per project is suitable. In the publishing industry, popular practice is to use a page rate rather than a word rate for editing and proofreading. Urgency:

FREELANCE CONTRACT This Freelance Contract (this "Agreement") is made as of this _ day of _, 20 _ , (the . After Independent Contractor sends Client an invoice. Independent Contractor will be paid within _ days after receiving Indep

organisation and the self-employed / freelance person should sign the letter to show their agreement. Both the organisation and the self-employed / freelance person should then get a copy of this signed letter. 3 CDET. Example of Contract for Self-e

FONT SIZE - Official/Freelance The suggested print font size is to be 10 to 12. The suggested text style is serif. TRANSCRIPT BINDING - Official/Freelance Transcripts shall be bound on the left side. FRONT TRANSCRIPT COVERS - Official/Freelance Transcripts shall be bound wi

- Bob Freiday, Freelance Writer "This book belongs within each writer's grasp, alongside the thesaurus and dictionary." - Pamela Allegretto, Author and Freelance Writer "I've already made use of one of the form query letters and I have never had such an overwhelming response!" - Ferne, Freelance Wri

ANsi A300 (Part 9) and isA bMP as they outline how risk tolerance affects risk rating, from fieldwork to legal defense, and we wanted to take that into account for the Unitil specification. The definitions and applications of the following items were detailed: