CIBSE Application Manual AM11 'Building Performance Modelling' Chapter .

6m ago
10 Views
1 Downloads
1.20 MB
13 Pages
Last View : 26d ago
Last Download : 6m ago
Upload by : Eli Jorgenson
Transcription

CIBSE Application Manual AM11 ‘Building Performance Modelling’ Chapter 8: Modelling of plant and renewable energy systems Scope and content of chapter 8 Theme 1 – modelling methods for plant and controls - Review of established methods - Using simplified control functions - Steady-state equipment modelling - Dynamic plant and controls modelling Theme 2 – embedded renewable energy systems - Photovoltaic systems - Solar thermal - Urban wind - Ground source heat pumps Authors for this chapter: Prof Chris Underwood (principal), University of Northumbria at Newcastle; Dr Simon Rees, University of Leeds AM11 Overview Seminar: March 15th 2016 1

CIBSE Application Manual AM11 ‘Building Performance Modelling’ Chapter 8: Modelling of plant and renewable energy systems Emphasis of chapter 8 Plant, controls and renewable systems often the ‘Cinderella’ part of BPS programs At the very least they seldom present with any degree of rigour and detail Our philosophy was to present details of modelling methods backed up with examples to help would-be modellers to develop their own tools Users of this chapter can therefore have a go at developing their own algorithms to deal with bespoke equipment modelling problems AM11 Overview Seminar: March 15th 2016 2

CIBSE Application Manual AM11 ‘Building Performance Modelling’ Chapter 8: Modelling of plant and renewable energy systems Theme 1 – simplified modelling using control functions The plant is not modelled – energy and ventilation flows are modelled using bandlimited deviations from set points Seasonal energy prediction; outline control strategies; summertime overheating with free cooling Example across – the classical 3-channel control sequence AM11 Overview Seminar: March 15th 2016 3

CIBSE Application Manual AM11 ‘Building Performance Modelling’ Chapter 8: Modelling of plant and renewable energy systems Theme 1 (continued) – modelling using steady-state plant components Describes how plant components can be modelled in the steady-state due to fast response compared with building envelope Examples include heat exchanger effectiveness method and ‘catalogue-fitted’ models of fans, chiller and heat pumps Examples of calculation algorithms in the form of pseudo code are given AM11 Overview Seminar: March 15th 2016 4

CIBSE Application Manual AM11 ‘Building Performance Modelling’ Chapter 8: Modelling of plant and renewable energy systems Theme 1 (continued) – ‘catalogue-fit’ models The example shows fitting to manufacturers data for a screw compressor-driven chiller Manufacturers are obliged to submit these details to meet BS-EN and ANSI/AHRI standards 𝑊 𝑎 𝑏𝑄 𝑐𝑄2 𝑑𝑇 𝑒𝑇 2 𝑓𝑄𝑇 𝑔𝑄2 𝑇 ℎ𝑄𝑇 2 𝑖𝑄2 𝑇 2 Similar detailed performance data widely available for heat pumps, fans, pumps and CHP modules, etc AM11 Overview Seminar: March 15th 2016 5

CIBSE Application Manual AM11 ‘Building Performance Modelling’ Chapter 8: Modelling of plant and renewable energy systems Theme 1 (continued) – dynamic modelling of plant and controls Approaches to more complex fully dynamic models are described The example here shows block diagram modelling used to investigate alternative controlled responses of radiator and underfloor heating These modelling methods offer the ultimate in detail and rigour at the expense of complexity and computational effort – very much for niche problem-solving AM11 Overview Seminar: March 15th 2016 6

CIBSE Application Manual AM11 ‘Building Performance Modelling’ Chapter 8: Modelling of plant and renewable energy systems Examples: Comparative simulation of air-source heat pump and phase-change store AM11 Overview Seminar: March 15th 2016 7

CIBSE Application Manual AM11 ‘Building Performance Modelling’ Chapter 8: Modelling of plant and renewable energy systems Examples: Photovoltaic-embedded heat pump simulation AM11 Overview Seminar: March 15th 2016 8

CIBSE Application Manual AM11 ‘Building Performance Modelling’ Chapter 8: Modelling of plant and renewable energy systems Examples: Stirling cycle mCHP – simulated reductions in module starts through storage Efficiency of Stirling cycle mCHP as a function of thermal storage capacity 70 69 Percent 68 67 66 65 64 63 0 50 100 150 200 250 Storage in litres Simulated module starts in a typical January for Stirling cycle mCHP 50 100 300 1000 Starts per month 800 600 400 200 0 0 150 Storage in litres 200 250 300 AM11 Overview Seminar: March 15th 2016 9

CIBSE Application Manual AM11 ‘Building Performance Modelling’ Chapter 8: Modelling of plant and renewable energy systems Theme 2 – solar renewables Shadow-casting simulation We review the approaches to modelling photovoltaic modules and powerconditioning systems Some BPS programs can simulate both shadow-casting onto PV surfaces as well as self-shading ISO 9459-5 procedure for solar collector performance is considered as are alternative analytical methods where Single diode PV model including inverter manufacturer’s information is limited AM11 Overview Seminar: March 15th 2016 10

CIBSE Application Manual AM11 ‘Building Performance Modelling’ Chapter 8: Modelling of plant and renewable energy systems Changing terrain boundary layer for urban wind device simulations Theme 2 – urban wind We review building integrated, building mounted and building augmented wind turbine options Effective wind speed – boundary layer considerations in open terrain and urban environments Power curve for a typical urban wind turbine Wind turbine power curves AM11 Overview Seminar: March 15th 2016 11

CIBSE Application Manual AM11 ‘Building Performance Modelling’ Chapter 8: Modelling of plant and renewable energy systems Theme 2 – ground source heat pumps We review the various methods available including key references - Analytical models - Two-dimensional numerical models - Response factor (g-function) models - Three-dimensional numerical models The trade-off between accuracy and computational effort is discussed These are long time-horizon problems – far longer than the time horizon of interest in most routine BPS investigations g-functions for alternative array patterns (top); 20-year GSHP simulation (bottom) AM11 Overview Seminar: March 15th 2016 12

CIBSE Application Manual AM11 ‘Building Performance Modelling’ Chapter 8: Modelling of plant and renewable energy systems Chapter 8 – summary and conclusions Plant, controls and embedded renewable treatments in many established BPS programs are still under development Rigour and detail are patchy In many cases, users will need to develop their own bespoke algorithms and tools to build on preliminary results obtained from an established BPS program Some approaches for the development of such are presented in this chapter and applications for these approaches are discussed The chapter is underpinned by 63 references giving sources of further reading and help for users AM11 Overview Seminar: March 15th 2016 13

CIBSE Application Manual AM11 'Building Performance Modelling' Chapter 8: Modelling of plant and renewable energy systems AM11 Overview Seminar: March 15th 2016 3 Theme 1 -simplified modelling using control functions The plant is not modelled -energy and ventilation flows are modelled using band-limited deviations from set points

Related Documents:

CIBSE Application Manual AM11 'Building Performance Modelling' AM11 Overview Seminar 4 Background to the New AM11 (BPM) AM11 has been completely re-written to reflect the vast development in building modelling and simulation over the past 17 years since the first version was published. The new Manual attempts to address the challenges

www.cibse.org. Guide A: Environmental Design . This is the 8. th. edition of CIBSE Guide A: Environmental Design. It is the premier UK technical reference source for designers and installers of

Overheating 25-28 C maximum for 1% of occupied hours CIBCE TM52, CIBSE TM59 Daylighting 2% av. daylight factor, 0.4 uniformity CIBSE LG10 CO2levels 900 ppm CIBSE TM40 Total VOCs 0.3 mg/

The following examples from Guide A Section 5 show how closely simulation reproduces standard CIBSE calculations. Heat Loss Guide A Section 5 example 5.1 Calculation of steady state heat losses. A small factory is heated to a resultant temperature of 19 C with an external air temperature of -1 C. Details of

Ceco Building Carlisle Gulf States Mesco Building Metal Sales Inc. Morin Corporation M.B.C.I. Nucor Building Star Building U.S.A. Building Varco Pruden Wedgcore Inc. Building A&S Building System Inland Building Steelox Building Summit Building Stran Buildings Pascoe Building Steelite Buil

BUILDING CODE Structure B1 BUILDING CODE B1 BUILDING CODE Durability B2 BUILDING CODE Access routes D1 BUILDING CODE External moisture E2 BUILDING CODE Hazardous building F2 materials BUILDING CODE Safety from F4 falling Contents 1.0 Scope and Definitions 3 2.0 Guidance and the Building Code 6 3.0 Design Criteria 8 4.0 Materials 32 – Glass 32 .

Set in 10/12.5pt Minion Pro by SPi Publisher Services, Pondicherry, India 1 2012 Shuttleworth_ffirs.indd ivShuttleworth_ffirs.indd iv 11/3/2011 10:07:00 AM11/3/2011 10:07:00 AM

Alex Rider was woken by the first chime. His eyes flickered open, but for a moment he stayed completely still in his bed, lying on his back with his head resting on the pillow. He heard a bedroom door open and a creak of wood as somebody went downstairs. The bell rang a second time, and he looked at the alarm clock glowing beside him. There was a rattle as someone slid the security chain off .