MENTORINGplus Workshop Series SERIES 5

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MENTORINGplusWorkshop SeriesSERIES 5FOSTER YOUTH MENTORSHIP TRAININGFOR PROGRAM MANAGERSDustianne North, M.S.W.Brenda Ingram, M.S.W., L.C.S.W.Produced by The EMT Group for the California Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs

The Mentoring Plus Workshop Series is a project of The EMT Group, Inc.,with funding by the California Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs.Graphic design by Jacqueline KrammPrinting by TC PrintingEvaluation, Management, Training391 South Lexington Drive, Suite 110Folsom, CA 95630916.983.9506California Department of Alcohol and Drug ProgramsMentor Resource Center800.879.2772

MENTORINGplusWorkshop SeriesSERIES 5FOSTER YOUTH MENTORSHIP TRAININGFOR PROGRAM MANAGERSDustianne North, M.S.W.Brenda Ingram, M.S.W., L.C.S.W.Produced by The EMT Group for the California Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs

TODAY’S AGENDA9:00Introductions9:30MODULE 1: A Child’s Path Through the Foster Care System10:45Break11:00MODULE 1: A Child’s Path Through the Foster Care System (continued)NoonLunch1:00MODULE 2: The Role of Mentoring in the Life of a Foster Youth1:15MODULE 3: What Mentors Can Offer Foster Youth1:45MODULE 4: Helping Foster Youth Prepare for the Future2:15Break2:30MODULE 5: Building Trust into Your Program Design3:15MODULE 6: Creating a Foster Youth Friendly Mentor Program4:00Next StepsFOSTER YOUTH MENTORSHIP TRAININGFOR PROGRAM MANAGERS

ABOUT THE TRAINERSDustianne North, M.S.W.DUSTIANNE NORTH has been working in the field of youth mentoring since 1995, when shebegan building a mentor and volunteer program for the foster youth in residence at the FlorenceCrittenton Center in Los Angeles in 1995. After creating the first mentoring program in Los AngelesCounty serving youth in foster care (with official approval from Los Angeles County Department ofChildren and Family Services, the LA Probation Department, and Community Care Licensing), Ms.North began providing training and technical assistance throughout the state for EMT. She specializes in assisting programs that serve special needs populations such as court-involved youth. Ms.North has now completed her M.S.W. at UCLA, and she continues to work toward her Ph.D. inSocial Welfare, also at UCLA. She draws upon her experiences with mentoring, her clinical trainingas a social worker, and her administrative expertise in designing curricula and facilitating trainings.This diverse scope of knowledge allows her to work with direct practice issues, such as communicating with youth, as well as macro-level issues, such as designing mentor programs for fosteryouth.Brenda Ingram, M.S.W., L.C.S.W.BRENDA INGRAM is a licensed clinical social worker who has worked in the fields of mentalhealth and trauma for the past 20 years. She is currently the West Region Clinical Specialist for TheCasey Family Programs, a child welfare foundation. She has provided numerous workshops forhuman service providers on compassion fatigue, trauma, impact of violence on adults and children,cultural competency, stress management and developmentally appropriate practice with youngchildren. She is a mental health consultant and trainer to school districts, child care programs,preschools, sexual assault programs and ex-offender programs. Ms. Ingram has been an adjunctfaculty member and guest lecturer for Pacific Oaks College and California State Universities in LosAngeles and Long Beach.

MENTORINGplusWorkshop SeriesWelcome to Today’s Training!California has the largest population of foster youth in the world. Theseyouth are an extremely high-risk population and require special attention tohelp them transition into safe and nurturing environments. EMT consultantsDustianne North, M.S.W., and Brenda Ingram, M.S.W., L.C.S.W., developedFoster Youth Mentorship Training for Program Managers to address the specialneeds of this population. They have dedicated significant time to the creationof this superb curriculum and we are confident that it will be a valuabletraining for foster youth mentoring program managers.We encourage you to ask questions and interact with your peers to shareexperiences and ideas during the workshop. Your commitment to making adifference with our youth is appreciated. Enjoy the day, and thank you forjoining us!About the Mentoring Plus Workshop SeriesThe Mentoring Plus Workshop Series addresses topics most critical to effectivementoring programs. The goal of these workshops is to assist new and existingmentoring programs in providing children and youth with the best mentoringpractices available. Mentoring Plus offers:·Free workshops by request·Curricula developed by experts in the mentoring field·A workshop manual that includes all presentation material·Information on accessing personalized technical assistance·Networking opportunitiesAdditional Training and Technical AssistanceCommunity- and school-based youth mentoring programs may receive freetechnical assistance and training from The Evaluation, Management andTraining (EMT) Group, which is funded to provide this service by the California Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs. Drawing on a statewide poolof diverse consultants, EMT tailors technical assistance to the specific needs ofthe requesting group.Please ask a workshop trainer for more information about available services.A Technical Assistance Application is provided for your use in the ProgramDevelopment Resources section of this binder. You may also contact Lisa Scottor Shelly Boehm of EMT directly at:·····Mail: 391 South Lexington Drive, Suite 110, Folsom, California 95630Tel: 916.983.9506Fax: 916.983.5738Email: lisa@emt.org or shellyb@emt.orgWebsite: www.emt.org

MENTORINGplusWorkshop SeriesFoster YouthMentorship Training forProgram ManagersThis training is aimed at mentor program managers inthe state of California who serve or who wish to serveyouth in foster care. Children who have been removedfrom their families typically face multiple risk factors,including a lack of consistent guidance and supportfrom adults. This means that foster youth represent a population thatcould benefit greatly from mentoring and that they also can be verydifficult to serve.Very few mentor programs in California are intended specifically forchildren and teens in out-of-home placements, and usually theseprograms are tied to a specific foster placement. This means that veryfew foster children have access to mentors, and that when they do,they often lose their mentors when their placements change. Although traditional mentor programs sometimes serve foster youth inthe context of their regular programs, in most cases traditionalprograms are ill-equipped to deal with the special needs of fosteryouth.The upshot is that foster children—and particularly those in grouphomes—are vastly underserved by mentoring and other volunteerbased efforts. This is largely due to the difficulties of working withthe bureaucracies responsible for children in the foster care system.While this system exists to protect and provide for children whohave been abused, neglected, or abandoned, it historically hasposed great obstacles to volunteer-based efforts to serve the childrenin its care. The result has been that many volunteers and programsshy away from serving youth in foster care settings.Happily, the last few years have shown a growing recognition inboth the field of mentoring and the field of foster care that mentorsare desperately needed for foster youth. In California, more andmore foster placements have established mentor programs; anAn EMT training developed by Dustianne North, M.S.W.,and Brenda Ingram, M.S.W., L.C.S.W.

Foster YouthMentorship Training forProgram Managersincreasing number of traditional programs have made moves towardextending their services to better address the needs of foster youth;and certain counties have taken steps to build collaboratives thatenable more children in out-of-home care to benefit from having amentor who is more likely to stay connected to them when theirplacements change.We congratulate you on your willingness to learn more aboutmentoring this population of youth who could benefit so greatly fromhaving mentors. Principles from this training can be applied to yourprogram in any of the following three ways:1. If you run a traditional mentoring program and would like toserve more youth in foster placements, this training will assistyou in making your program more accessible and beneficialfor foster youth.2. If you run a mentor program specifically for foster youth, thistraining is designed to help you better coordinate your effortswith other facets of the foster care system so that yourmentees may retain their mentors longer and so that yourmentors can be a more active and integrated part of theirmentee’s treatment team.3. If your program is interested in initiating or supporting acounty-wide effort to link mentor programs together with thechildrens’ services department in your county, this training isaimed at assisting you in creating a comprehensive mentoringnetwork that is able to provide higher-impact mentoring formore youth in your county.As professionals who have seen first-hand the benefits that youth inplacement can enjoy by having a caring, committed mentor on theirside, we salute you for your interest in serving this population. Mostvolunteers who work with children in foster care report that therewards are great as long as they have the support of a strong program to assist them in navigating the system alongside their mentees.We also believe that the more programs there are that serve fosterchildren—and the more those programs work collaboratively toimprove service—the more volunteers and mentor programs willbecome catalysts in healing the overall system that serves youth infoster care. Thank you for being a part of this important process forchildren who need our care the most!

Foster YouthMentorship Training forProgram ManagersContentsMODULE 1: A Child’s Path Through the Foster Care SystemWhat Are Your 5 Most Valued Things?The Story of Mary JonesWhat Was It Like to be Mary Jones?Charting a Child’s Path Through the Foster Care SystemFacts About Foster CareMODULE 2: The Role of Mentoring in the Life of a Foster YouthGenogram of Mary JonesEco-Maps of Mary JonesHow Do Mentors and Mentoring Programs Fit In?MODULE 3: What Mentors Can Offer Foster YouthCommunication StrategiesAppropriate ActivitiesResource AssistanceRed Flags & IcebreakersMODULE 4: Helping Foster Youth Prepare for the FutureWhat Do Foster Youth Need to Become Successful Adults?Facts About Exiting Foster CareIt’s My Life: A Framework for Foster Youth Transitioning into AdulthoodIt’s My Life: An Action PlanMODULE 5: Building Trust into Your Mentor Program DesignRecruitment, Oreintation & ScreeningMentor TrainingMatchingMonitoring & SupervisionClosures & Matching ChangesMODULE 6: Creating a Foster Youth Friendly Mentor ProgramThe Importance of the Clinical ComponentTapping into Natural Systems of Placement SettingsIntegrating Mentors into the Treatment TeamPreparing Foster Youth for MentoringMentee Training TopicsTips for Creating Referral SystemsKeeping Matches Together When Placements ChangeEvaluating the Success of Your Foster Youth Mentoring Program

Foster YouthMentorship Training forProgram ManagersMODULE 7: Next StepsKey Points to RememberNext Steps Action PlanResources AvailableCURRICULA RESOURCESFoster Youth Mentorship Training (for use with mentors), The EMTGroupMODULE 1: A Child’s Path Through the Foster Care SystemMODULE 2: The Role of a Mentor in the Life of a Foster YouthMODULE 3: What Mentors Can Offer Foster YouthMODULE 4: Helping Foster Youth Prepare for the FutureFoster Youth Mentoring Program, California Community CollegesMODULE 2: The California Foster Care SystemMODULE 3: Understanding Foster YouthResponsible Mentoring: Talking About Drugs, Sex and Other DifficultIssues, The EMT GroupMODULE 1: Agency ResponsibilitiesMODULE 2: Appropriate RolesMODULE 3: ValuesMODULE 4: Difficult Topics and IssuesMODULE 5: Communication StrategiesMODULE 6: Role PlayingOrder Form for Get Real. Get A Mentor., an EMT Mentee PreparednessWorkbookPROGRAM DEVELOPMENT RESOURCESTechnical Assistance Request FormMentoring Workshops Available by RequestRequest for Inclusion in the California Mentor Program DatabaseRecommended Best Practices for Mentor ProgramsMentoring Program Risk Self-Assessment / Classification of MentoringRelationship TypesStarting a Mentoring Program, The EMT GroupHelping Hands Mentor Program Abstract, Florence Crittenton CentermPLAY (Mentoring Partnership for Los Angeles Youth): PartnershipModel & Pilot Program (DRAFT DOCUMENT)mPLAY Memorandum of Understanding (Sample MOU)

What I have in common with.This exercise is designed to give you an opportunity to learn a little bit about the people in thisworkshop. Below are some questions/statements about yourself. Answer the question/statementabout yourself first. Then go around to different people in the workshop and find out if you haveanything in common with them. You are to write the name of the person who shares that commonitem with you in the box. The person who fills the most boxes on their sheet wins a prize. You willbe given 20 minutes to complete this exercise.Good luck!My birthdayis My favorite songis My favoriteflower is .I am married.My favorite typeof vehicle is My favoritecolor is A pet peeve ofmine is I havechildren.Both my parentsare still alive My job is My favorite foodis My least favoritething to do is I am happiestwhen.My favorite cityin the world is My favorite typeof animal is I was born in(name of city) I like the TVshow I am notmarried.I would love totravel to My least favoritefood is I play a musicalinstrument I went to collegeat My pet isa I hate it when My hobbyis

MENTORING PROGRAM RISK SELF-ASSESSMENTDIRECTIONS:Complete the following Agency Self-Assessment. It will help you identify the risk factors inherent inyour mentoring program so that can develop an appropriate mentor profile.Work individually or with other members from your own agency.Circle the answer that is most appropriate.1. Mentoring takes place:A. In a school, youth center, church, or other facility with staff supervision ONLYB. BOTH at a facility with staff supervision and out in the community unsupervised (this includesprograms that have supervised formal sessions, but allow their mentors to have outside contactwith their mentees)C. Out in the community ONLY, with mentors and mentees working independently and without staffsupervisionD. Not yet determined2.Mentees are transported:A. Never — transportation is not an element of the programB. By staff onlyC. By staff and volunteers, or just volunteersD. Not yet determined3.Visits or outings are approved by:A. Parents or relatives with custody AND staffB. Parents or relatives with custody ONLYC. Foster family, social worker, or other professional guardian when children are wards of the courtD. Not yet determined4. Rate the overall stability of your organization and program based on secure funding and resources,experience and continuity of staff, retention of mentors, and community support:A. Strong, stable and supportedB. Some staff turnover present OR lack of long-term funding BUT NOT BOTHC. Some staff turnover present AND lack of long-term fundingD. Program has not yet secured staff and/or funding5. Refer to the attached “Classifications of Mentoring Relationship Types” and circle the choice thatbest matches the “softest” type of mentoring relationships characteristic of your program.A. Soft – MediumB. HardC. Hard CoreD. Not yet determined6. Refer to the attached “Classifications of Mentoring Relationship Types” and circle the choice thatbest matches the “hardest” type of mentoring relationships characteristic of your program.A. Soft – MediumB. HardC. Hard CoreD. Not yet determined7.You consider your program to be primarily:FOSTER YOUTH MENTORSHIP TRAINING FOR PROGRAM MANAGERS EMTcontinued

A. A prevention strategy to support before drugs, gangs, violence, teen pregnancy, and otherdangers ONLYB. BOTH a prevention strategy AND a method of intervention that helps youth who have already runinto problems with school, criminal and/or violent behavior, drug or alcohol abuse, etc.C. An intervention strategy ONLYD. Not yet determined8.Rate the level of training provided to mentors:A. Orientation and training are extensive and thoroughB. Orientation and training are adequate to get mentors startedC. Orientation only — no real training providedD. Not yet determined9.Rate the level of support provided to mentors:A. Extensive support from staff, other mentors, AND possibly parents or guardiansB. Strong support from staff OR other mentors, but not bothCSupport comes only from parents or guardiansD. Not yet determined10. The neighborhood(s)/community(ies) served by your agency is(are):AMixed levels of income; many stable community members who could serve as mentors; somefamilies struggling; reasonable quality of education provided by local public schools; strongpresence of youth programs and service; rising levels of crime; some presence of drug andalcohol abuse, and some gang presenceB. Dominated by lower-income families; some stable community members; many families struggling;educational programs could be improved; more youth programs and services are needed; crimeis an ingrained reality, although is kept somewhat at bay by long-standing community efforts;significant presence of drug and alcohol abuse and trafficking, and significant gang presenceC. Dominated by low-income families; fewer stable community members; substandard educationalprograms; many more youth programs and services are needed; crime is prevalent and deeplyingrained; prevailing drug and alcohol abuse and trafficking; powerful gang presenceD. Not yet determinedSCORINGPOINTS: To total your score, give your program 1 POINT for every answer “A” or “D” you selected,2 POINTS for every “B” you selected, and 3 POINTS for every “C” you selected.ADJUSTMENTS FOR “D” ANSWERS: IF you answered “D” to 4 or more questions, your program isnot yet defined sufficiently to fully develop a mentor profile. IFyou answered “D” to 3 questions AND your score is 22-24, ADD2 POINTS to the total. IF you answered “D” to 2 questions ANDA:x 1 your score is 24-26, ADD 1 POINT to the total.B:x 2 SCORE: There are 30 points possible. The number of pointsindicates ROUGHLY the level of risk your program faces. This isONLY to give a general idea, and to match you with otherprograms in the room that are facing similar risk levels that youare — it is not meant to formally classify any program.16–19: SOFT / LOW RISK 20–23: MEDIUM 24–26: HARD / HIGHRISK 27–30: HARD CORE / EXTREME RISKFOSTER YOUTH MENTORSHIP TRAINING FOR PROGRAM MANAGERS EMTC:x 3 D:x 1 SUBTOTAL:Point adjustmentsfor D answers GRAND TOTAL:

MENTORINGplusWorkshop SeriesMODULE 1A Child’s PathThrough the FosterCare SystemIN THIS MODULEWhat Are Your 5 Most Valued Things?The Story of Mary JonesWhat Was It Like to be Mary Jones?Charting a Child’s Path Through the Foster Care SystemFacts About Foster CareFOSTER YOUTH MENTORSHIP TRAINING FOR PROGRAM MANAGERSEMT

MODULE 1A Child’s Path Through the Foster Care SystemnotesWhat Are Your 5 MostValued Things?1.2.3.4.5.1:2FOSTER YOUTH MENTORSHIP TRAINING FOR PROGRAM MANAGERS EMT

MODULE 1A Child’s Path Through the Foster Care SystemJOURNEYING WITH A FOSTER YOUTHnotesThe Story of Mary JonesAT AGE 11, Mary Jones was removed from her home after allegationsof neglect and sexual abuse. Mary had been living for the past fiveyears in Los Angeles County with her stepfather, Andrew Williams,her mother, Beth Young, and three younger males siblings: John Jones,age 8, Paul Williams, age 5, and Andrew “Andy” Williams Jr., age 4.Mary had reported to her chorus teacher at school that her stepfatherhad been engaging in sexual intercourse with her since she was 9years old. Her mother refused to believe the allegat

Foster Youth Mentorship Training (for use with mentors), The EMT Group MODULE 1: A ChildÕs Path Through the Foster Care System MODULE 2: The Role of a Mentor in the Life of a Foster Youth MODULE 3: What Mentors Can Offer Foster Youth MODULE 4: Helping Foster Youth Prepare for the Future Foster Youth Mentoring Program, California Community Colleges

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