GCE Psychology Mark Scheme H567/03 June 2018

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GCEPsychologyUnit H567/03: Applied psychologyAdvanced GCEMark Scheme for June 2018Oxford Cambridge and RSA Examinations

OCR (Oxford Cambridge and RSA) is a leading UK awarding body, providing a wide range ofqualifications to meet the needs of candidates of all ages and abilities. OCR qualificationsinclude AS/A Levels, Diplomas, GCSEs, Cambridge Nationals, Cambridge Technicals,Functional Skills, Key Skills, Entry Level qualifications, NVQs and vocational qualifications inareas such as IT, business, languages, teaching/training, administration and secretarial skills.It is also responsible for developing new specifications to meet national requirements and theneeds of students and teachers. OCR is a not-for-profit organisation; any surplus made isinvested back into the establishment to help towards the development of qualifications andsupport, which keep pace with the changing needs of today’s society.This mark scheme is published as an aid to teachers and students, to indicate the requirementsof the examination. It shows the basis on which marks were awarded by examiners. It does notindicate the details of the discussions which took place at an examiners’ meeting before markingcommenced.All examiners are instructed that alternative correct answers and unexpected approaches incandidates’ scripts must be given marks that fairly reflect the relevant knowledge and skillsdemonstrated.Mark schemes should be read in conjunction with the published question papers and the reporton the examination. OCR 2018

H567/03Mark SchemeAnnotationsAnnotationMeaningTickIncorrect responseBenefit of doubt givenAttempts evaluationContextEvaluationSignificant amount of material which doesn’t answer the questionNot answered questionUnclearGood use of research/supporting evidenceDevelopment of pointOmission markUse in conjunction with other annotations to highlight textUse in conjunction with other annotations to highlight textBlank page3June 2018

H567/03Mark SchemeJune 2018Subject-specific Marking InstructionsINTRODUCTIONYour first task as an Examiner is to become thoroughly familiar with the material on which the examination depends. This material includes: the specification, especially the assessment objectivesthe question paper and its rubricsthe mark scheme.You should ensure that you have copies of these materials.You should ensure also that you are familiar with the administrative procedures related to the marking process. These are set out in the OCRbooklet Instructions for Examiners. If you are examining for the first time, please read carefully Appendix 5 Introduction to Script Marking:Notes for New Examiners.Please ask for help or guidance whenever you need it. Your first point of contact is your Team Leader.4

H567/03Mark SchemeJune 2018LEVELS OF RESPONSE – LEVEL DESCRIPTORSAO1Response demonstrates goodrelevant knowledge andunderstanding. Accurate anddetailed description.AO2Response demonstrates goodapplication of psychological knowledgeand understanding. Application will bemainly explicit, accurate and relevant.AO3Response demonstrates good analysis,interpretation and/or evaluation that is mainlyrelevant to the demand of the question. Validconclusions that effectively summarise issuesand argument is highly skilled and showsgood understanding.ReasonableResponse demonstratesreasonable relevant knowledgeand understanding. Generallyaccurate description lacking somedetail.Response demonstrates reasonableapplication of psychological knowledgeand understanding. Application will bepartially explicit, accurate and relevant.Response demonstrates reasonable analysis,interpretation and/or evaluation that ispartially relevant to the demand of thequestion. Valid conclusions that effectivelysummarise issues and argument arecompetent and understanding is reasonable.LimitedResponse demonstrates limitedrelevant knowledge andunderstanding. Limited descriptionlacking in detail.Response demonstrates limitedapplication of psychological knowledgeand understanding. Application may berelated to the general topic area ratherthan the specific question.Response demonstrates limited analysis,interpretation and/or evaluation that may berelated to topic area. Some valid conclusionsthat summarise issues and arguments.BasicResponse demonstrates basicknowledge and understanding thatis only partially relevant. Basicdescription with no detail.Response demonstrates basicapplication of psychological knowledgeand understanding. Responses will begeneralised lacking focus on thequestion.Response demonstrates basic analysis,interpretation and/or evaluation that is notrelated to the question. Basic or no validconclusions that attempt to summariseissues. No evidence of arguments.Good5

H567/03Mark SchemeJune 2018USING THE MARK SCHEMEPlease study this Mark Scheme carefully. The Mark Scheme is an integral part of the process that begins with the setting of the question paper andends with the awarding of grades. Question papers and Mark Schemes are developed in association with each other so that issues ofdifferentiation and positive achievement can be addressed from the very start.This Mark Scheme is a working document; it is not exhaustive; it does not provide ‘correct’ answers. The Mark Scheme can only provide ‘bestguesses’ about how the question will work out, and it is subject to revision after we have looked at a wide range of scripts.In your marking, you will encounter valid responses which are not covered by the Mark Scheme: these responses must be credited. You willencounter answers which fall outside the ‘target range’ of Bands for the paper which you are marking. Please mark these answers according to themarking criteria.Please read carefully all the scripts in your allocation and make every effort to look positively for achievement throughout the ability range. Alwaysbe prepared to use the full range of marks.INSTRUCTIONS TO EXAMINERS:INDIVIDUAL ANSWERS1The indicative content indicates the expected parameters for candidates’ answers, but be prepared to recognise and credit unexpectedapproaches where they show relevance.2Using ‘best-fit’, decide first which set of BAND DESCRIPTORS best describes the overall quality of the answer. Once the band is located,adjust the mark concentrating on features of the answer which make it stronger or weaker following the guidelines for refinement.Highest mark: If clear evidence of all the qualities in the band descriptors is shown, the HIGHEST Mark should be awarded.Lowest mark: If the answer shows the candidate to be borderline (i.e. they have achieved all the qualities of the bands below and show limitedevidence of meeting the criteria of the band in question) the LOWEST mark should be awarded.Middle mark: This mark should be used for candidates who are secure in the band. They are not ‘borderline’ but they have only achievedsome of the qualities in the band descriptors.3Be prepared to use the full range of marks. Do not reserve (e.g.) high Band 6 marks ‘in case’ something turns up of a quality you have not yetseen. If an answer gives clear evidence of the qualities described in the band descriptors, reward appropriately.4Consideration should be given to the weightings of the assessment objectives within a question, these are clearly stated for each questionand care should be taken not to place too much emphasis on a particular skill.6

H567/03Mark SchemeJune 2018Section A: Issues in mental healthQuestion1 (a)AnswerOutline a non-biological treatment of one specificdisorder.Marks5Guidance5 marks – Good application of a clear, detailed and accuratenon-biological treatment to a specified (named) disorder.3-4 marks – Reasonable application of a non-biologicaltreatment to a specified (named) or implied disorder.AO2 (5 marks)Candidates are likely to refer to exposure-based therapiessuch as systematic desensitisation or flooding, aversiontherapy, cognitive behavioural therapies, client-centredtherapy, or psychotherapy. Candidates must specify thedisorder being treated to access more than the bottomband. Treatments must be non-biological.1-2 marks – Limited application of a non-biological treatmentwith no reference to a specific disorder.0 marks – No creditworthy response.Other appropriate responses should be credited.1(b)Discuss one strength and one weakness of the nonbiological treatment referred to in your answer to 1(a).AO1 (3 marks)Candidates will demonstrate knowledge andunderstanding by commenting accurately on the nonbiological treatment referred to in response to the previousquestion. For the top band, points made need to beaccurate and to be specific to the non-biological treatmentreferred to (i.e. be more than just generic points).AO3 (3 marks)Candidates should consider one strength and oneweakness of the non-biological treatment referred to inresponse to the previous question. Points made couldrelate to the efficacy of a treatment, practical issues (e.g.cost, availability), side effects, etc. Points need actually tobe strengths or weaknesses and should be discussed.Other appropriate responses should be credited.765-6 marks – Response demonstrates good analysis,interpretation and/or evaluation that is mainly relevant to thedemand of the question. There is good relevant knowledgeand understanding.3-4 marks – Response demonstrates reasonable analysis,interpretation and/or evaluation that is partially relevant to thedemand of the question. There is reasonable relevantknowledge and understanding.1-2 marks – Response demonstrates limited analysis,interpretation and/or evaluation that may be related to thetopic area. There is limited relevant knowledge andunderstanding.0 marks – No creditworthy response.

H567/03Question2 (a)Mark SchemeAnswerIn the key research by Szasz (2011), the author statesthat “there is no such thing as mental illness.” Howdoes Szasz defend this claim?Marks3June 2018Guidance3 marks – Good knowledge and understanding of therationale behind Szasz’s view about mental illness. Reasonsare identified and explained.2 marks – Reasonable knowledge and understanding of therationale behind Szasz’s view about mental illness. Reasonsare identified but not explained.AO1 (3 marks)Candidates could be expected to make reference to any ofSzasz’s arguments. For example, some bodily illnessesare wrongly diagnosed as mental illnesses; the term‘mental illness’ reflects a judgement by other people aboutparticular (‘bad’) ways of behaving; it’s a legal definition;it’s a medical construct; it’s a political construct; it’ssociety’s judgement. Although Szasz mentions derogatorylabels he does not refer to labelling theory.1 mark – Limited knowledge and understanding of therationale behind Szasz’s view about mental illness.0 marks – No creditworthy response.Other appropriate responses should be credited.2(b)Evaluate Szasz’s view that “there is no such thing asmental illness.”5AO1 (1 mark)Arguments should be illustrated with appropriate examples(e.g. of mental disorders, cultures, diagnostic manuals,etc.).AO3 (4 marks)Comments could be supportive or critical. In defence ofSzasz’s view, for example, candidates might point to theway in which judgements about what counts as a mentalillness can vary over time or between cultures; they couldalso point to biological explanations of specific mentaldisorders. Against Szasz’s argument, they might citeexamples of disturbances that would elicit concern in anylocation at any time, and which have not been explainedbiologically; they could also make reference to the way inwhich diagnoses of mental illness can open the door tosupport. To be able to access the top band, candidates are85 marks – Good evaluation of Szasz’s view about mentalillness. Typically, at least two lines of argument will beexplored with relevant supporting evidence.3–4 marks – Reasonable evaluation of Szasz’s view aboutmental illness. Two lines of argument may be explored withlimited supporting evidence or one line of argument may beexplored with good supporting evidence.1–2 marks – Limited evaluation of Szasz’s view about mentalillness. One line of argument is explored with reasonable orlimited supporting evidence.0 marks – No creditworthy response.

H567/03QuestionMark SchemeAnswerlikely to explore more than one argument.MarksJune 2018GuidanceOther appropriate responses should be credited.3Explain how the key research by Rosenhan (1973)contributes to an understanding of individual, socialand cultural diversity.65-6 marks – Response demonstrates good application ofpsychological knowledge and understanding. There is goodrelevant knowledge and understanding.AO1 (2 marks)Candidates should illustrate their arguments withappropriate details from within the Rosenhan paper.3-4 marks – Response demonstrates reasonable applicationof psychological knowledge and understanding. There isreasonable relevant knowledge and understanding.AO2 (4 marks)In relation to individual diversity, candidates could point tothe way in which 35 patients (but no staff members)suspected the pseudopatients of faking their symptoms instudy 1; from study 2, they could point to differencesbetween members of staff in their ratings of whether the193 patients were pseudopatients or not. Social diversitycould be illustrated by the way in which one social group(students) were treated differently from another socialgroup (patients diagnosed with mental disorders) whenthey asked an innocuous question. The study could besaid to contribute to an understanding of cultural diversityby illustrating how, in one particular culture (the USA),mental disorders are/were (mis)diagnosed; points couldalso be made about how patients in mental hospitals withinthis culture are/were treated.1-2 marks – Response demonstrates limited application ofpsychological knowledge and understanding. There is limitedrelevant knowledge and understanding.Other appropriate responses should be credited.90 marks – No creditworthy response.

H567/03Question4*Mark SchemeAnswerTo what extent are explanations of mental illnessdeterminist?Marks10AO1 (2 marks)Candidates should demonstrate knowledge andunderstanding of what makes something ‘determinist’.AO3 (8 marks)Candidates should analyse, interpret and evaluateexplanations of mental illness in relation to determinism.Relevant points that could be made in the context ofarguments about freewill or determinism might relate toconcordance rates, causation versus correlation, individualdifferences, the effectiveness of treatments (and what thismight tell us about an explanation), findings from empiricalresearch, the difficulties of isolating individual causes, etc.Arguments could support determinism or freewill. Anyexplanations of mental illness can be referred to. Theinjunction ‘to what extent’ invites consideration of how farexplanations of mental illness are determinist.Other appropriate responses should be credited.Total3510June 2018Guidance9–10 marks – The response demonstrates good knowledgeand understanding of determinism. There is a good analysisof determinism in relation to alternatives to explanations ofmental illness. There is a well-developed line of reasoningwhich is clear and logically structured. The informationpresented is relevant and substantiated.6–8 marks – The response demonstrates reasonableknowledge and understanding of determinism. There is areasonable discussion of determinism in relation toexplanations of mental illness. There is a line of reasoningpresented with some structure. The information presented isin the most-part relevant and supported by some evidence.3–5 marks – The response demonstrates limited knowledgeand understanding of determinism. There is a limiteddiscussion of determinism superficially related toexplanations of mental illness. The information has somerelevance and is presented with limited structure. Theinformation is supported by limited evidence.1–2 marks – The response demonstrates basic knowledgeand understanding of determinism. There is a basicdiscussion of determinism which may not be in relation toexplanations of mental illness. The information is basic andcommunicated in an unstructured way. The information issupported by limited evidence and the relationship to theevidence may not be clear.0 marks – No creditworthy response.

H567/03Mark SchemeJune 2018Section B: OptionsQuestion5(a)*AnswerUse the key research by Van Leeuwen et al. (2008) toexplain the effect of biological factors uponintelligence.MarksGuidanceAO1 (5 marks)Candidates must refer to the key study by Van Leeuwen etal. to access the top band. Candidates will demonstrateknowledge and understanding of this key study throughdescribing the psychological evidence of the key studyappropriately and effectively.AO2 (5 marks)Candidates should apply their knowledge andunderstanding of the study by Van Leeuwen et al. toexplain the effect of biological factors upon intelligence.Answers can be expected to refer to the finding thatgenetic effects accounted for 67% of the participants’scores on the Raven tests, although for children with agenetic predisposition towards lower intelligence the effectof biological factors was reduced as an additional 9% ofthe variation between participants was attributable togene-environment interaction. Better responses willexplain the biological factors (e.g. emphasising howmonozygotic twins share all, or nearly all, of their DNA).Less detailed answers or answers that simply describe thestudy without using it to explain the effect of biologicalfactors upon intelligence will only gain marks in the lowerbands.(b)*10PLEASE REFER TO APPENDIX 1Discuss methodological issues involved whenresearching intelligence.15AO1 (2 marks)Candidates should demonstrate knowledge andunderstanding of methodological issues.11PLEASE REFER TO APPENDIX 2

H567/03Mark SchemeQuestionAnswerMarksJune 2018GuidanceAO3 (13 marks)Candidates should analyse, interpret and evaluatemethodological issues involved when researchingintelligence. As well as referring to the key research,candidates can refer to research investigating whatpsychologists mean by intelligence and what biologicalfactors could affect intelligence. Any relevant study iscreditworthy. There are many potential methodologicalissues but issues centring on the validity of intelligencetests are especially pertinent (e.g. debates about theconstruct being measured and whether it should bedefined broadly to include EI or MI). Cultural bias andinternal reliability (e.g. split-half reliability) can also beraised as issues with tests themselves. Candidates mayalso explore issues with research into factors influencingintelligence such as ensuring representative samples ofparticipants and controlling for participant variables: thesemay be linked to the use of twin or adoption studies.Validity may emerge as an issue again (e.g. via brainscans or establishing cause and effect) and so too mayreliability (e.g. through sample sizes or through researchneeding to be repeated). Answers can be critical but canalso defend the research. Methodological issues need tobe discussed, rather than simply identified and illustrated.Other appropriate responses should be credited.(c)*What advice might a psychologist provide to Nasra’scompany about the best method for assessing theintelligence of job applicants?AO2 (10 marks)Candidates need to apply their knowledge andunderstanding of methods of assessing intelligence.Answers may make reference to specific intelligence tests(e.g. Raven’s Advanced Progressive Matrices, or the1210PLEASE REFER TO APPENDIX 3

H567/03Mark SchemeQuestionAnswerWechsler Adult Intelligence Scale) and any relevant testwould be creditworthy (e.g. testing for MultipleIntelligences or Emotional Intelligence). However,candidates can still access the top bands by describingmethods of assessing intelligence without naming aspecific test. The strongest responses will engage with thequestion of why their suggested method is “best”, possiblyreferring to the content of the test, to the type of data itgenerates, or even to practical considerations in relation toits administration, etc. It is important that the suggestionsare related to the context of the question (i.e. a companyinvolved in designing computer games). A suggestedmethod could draw upon a range of existing ways ofmeasuring intelligence, collating them together into a newmethod specifically for this situation.MarksJune 2018GuidanceOther appropriate responses should be credited.6(a)*Use the key research by Dixon et al. (2002) to explainhow the characteristics of a defendant can affectwhether they are found guilty.AO1 (5 marks)Candidates must refer to the key study by Dixon et al toaccess the top band. Candidates will demonstrateknowledge and understanding of this key study throughdescribing the psychological evidence of the key studyappropriately and effectively.10AO2 (5 marks)Candidates should apply their knowledge andunderstanding of the study by Dixon et al to explain howthe characteristics of a defendant can affect whether theyare found guilty. Answers can be expected to focus onhaving a ‘Brummie’ accent and also, in the case of bluecollar crime, being black. They may also refer to thevariable of superiority in relation to a suspect’s accent13PLEASE REFER TO APPENDIX 1

H567/03Mark SchemeQuestion(b)Answer(with the ‘Brummie’ accent being rated as less superiorthan the ‘standard’ accent). Less detailed answers oranswers that simply describe the study without using it toexplain how the characteristics of a defendant can affectwhether they are found guilty will only gain marks in thelower bands.*MarksJune 2018GuidanceDiscuss ethical considerations of research intopsychology and the courtroom.AO1 (2 marks)Candidates should demonstrate knowledge andunderstanding of ethical considerations.AO3 (13 marks)Candidates should analyse, interpret and evaluate ethicalconsiderations of research into psychology and thecourtroom. As well as referring to the key research,candidates can refer to research investigating how juriescan be persuaded by the characteristics of witnesses anddefendants. Any relevant study is creditworthy. Candidatesmay refer to ethical guidelines in their answer (informedconsent, withdrawal, protection from harm, etc.), butstronger responses may go further to consider such issuesas the ethics of research being used to help the guilty befound innocent or the innocent be found guilty. Thequestion of whether ‘the end justifies the means’ could beexplored. Candidates may be critical in the points theymake but, equally, they may defend research. Ethicalconsiderations need to be evaluated, rather than simplyidentified and illustrated.Other appropriate responses should be credited.1415PLEASE REFER TO APPENDIX 2

H567/03Mark SchemeQuestion(c)*AnswerWhat might a psychologist suggest about how Alancan improve jury decision-making?MarksAO2 (10 marks)Candidates need to apply their knowledge andunderstanding of strategies to influence jury decisionmaking. Suggestions could centre on concealingcharacteristics of witnesses and/or defendants that couldaffect jurors (e.g. through them testifying from behindscreens, etc.) or requiring that any extra-evidentialstrategies found to influence juries be used by bothprosecution and defence so that neither side gains anunfair advantage. Juries could also be given training (e.g.about not giving undue weight to witnesses just becausethey are confident, or about being wary of the CSI effect).Answers that consider the size of a jury or the nature ofjury deliberation (e.g. requiring secret voting to avoidconformity effects) can also be relevant. It is important thatthe suggestions are related to the context of the question.10June 2018GuidancePLEASE REFER TO APPENDIX 3Other appropriate responses should be credited.7(a)*Explain how the key research by Ulrich (1984) couldbe used to influence the design of hospitals.AO1 (5 marks)Candidates must refer to the key study by Ulrich to accessthe top band. Candidates will demonstrate knowledge andunderstanding of this key study through describing thepsychological evidence of the key study appropriately andeffectively.AO2 (5 marks)Candidates should apply their knowledge andunderstanding of the study by Ulrich to make suggestionsabout the design of hospitals. Answers can be expected to1510PLEASE REFER TO APPENDIX 1

H567/03Mark SchemeQuestion(b)Answerfocus on the views from windows, with views of naturalscenes (trees) being favoured over views of walls. Thebest candidates will go further, suggesting that patientsrecovering from the most serious conditions be prioritisedwhen allocating tree views, beds within wards bepositioned close to windows with tree views, hospitals bedesigned to have as many rooms as possible withoutward-looking views over trees, etc. Less detailedanswers or answers that simply describe the study withoutmaking suggestions about how it could be used toinfluence the design of hospitals will only gain marks in thelower bands.*MarksJune 2018GuidanceDiscuss the validity of research into psychologicaleffects of the built environment.AO1 (2 marks)Candidates should demonstrate knowledge andunderstanding of the validity of research.AO3 (13 marks)Candidates should analyse, interpret and evaluate thevalidity of research into the psychological effects of thebuilt environment. As well as referring to the key research,candidates can refer to research investigating the impactof the built environment and urban renewal on ourwellbeing. Any relevant research is creditworthy.Candidates may discuss the following: the difficulty ofisolating a particular variable (e.g. nature view; noise;density) to be able to say that it is this that is having aneffect; the extent to which data collected though self-reportmeans might be vulnerable to demand characteristics orsocial desirability bias; the extent to which findings from aparticular sample can be generalised from (i.e. populationvalidity); whether findings have had predictive validity inrelation to the success of future buildings projects; the1615PLEASE REFER TO APPENDIX 2

H567/03Mark SchemeQuestionAnswerecological validity of field-based research may be praisedat the same time as difficulties in imposing controls on itmay be recognised. Points about validity need to bediscussed, rather than simply identified and illustrated.MarksJune 2018GuidanceOther appropriate responses should be credited.(c)*What might a psychologist suggest about how Joncan achieve his aim?AO2 (10 marks)Candidates need to apply their knowledge andunderstanding of environmental design used to improvehealth/wellbeing. There are a wide range of suggestionsthat could be made including incorporation of greenspaces, low density housing, noise reduction, defensiblespace, cul-de-sacs, cycle lanes, local facilities (to avoidunnecessary travel), etc. It is important that thesuggestions are related to the context of the question.10PLEASE REFER TO APPENDIX 3Other appropriate responses should be credited.8(a)*Use the key research by Munroe-Chandler et al. (2008)to explain the benefits of imagery in sport.AO1 (5 marks)Candidates must refer to the key study by MunroeChandler et al to access the top band. Candidates willdemonstrate knowledge and understanding of this keystudy through describing the psychological evidence of thekey study appropriately and effectively.1710PLEASE REFER TO APPENDIX 1

H567/03Mark SchemeQuestionAnswerMarksJune 2018GuidanceAO2 (5 marks)Candidates should apply their knowledge andunderstanding of the study by Munroe-Chandler et al toexplain the benefits of imagery in sport. Answers can beexpected to focus on how, out of the five ways of usingimagery, MG-M imagery was found to be a strongpredictor of both self-confidence and self-efficacy foryoung athletes, and this was true irrespective of whetherthey played recreationally or competitively. Although itwas stronger for recreational players, this was notsignificantly so. This suggests how MG-M imagery can bebeneficial in boosting self-confidence and/or self-efficacy.It is important that answers are related to the sportingcontext. Less detailed answers or answers that simplydescribe the study without relating its findings to thecontext of sport will only gain marks in the lower bands.(b)*Discuss the reliability of research into motivation insport.AO1 (2 marks)Candidates should demonstrate knowledge andunderstanding of reliability.AO3 (13 marks)Candidates should analyse, interpret and evaluate thereliability of research into motivation in sport. Reliabilityissues can arise in a number of ways, such as through theuse of standardised questionnaires, the use of multipleitems to measure the same variable, the use of largesamples, testing and retesting, or through whether findingsare supported in follow-up studies. As well as referring tothe key research, candidates can refer to studiesinvestigating self-efficacy and sports confidence, includingimagery and sports orientation. Any relevant research iscreditworthy; however, it does need locating in the context1815PLEASE REFER TO APPENDIX 2

H567/03Mark SchemeQuestionAnswerof the question. Candidates may argue for or against thereliability of research into motivation is sport. Reliabilityissues need to be discussed, rather than simply identifiedand illustrated.MarksJune 2018GuidanceOther appropriate responses should be credited.(c)*What advice might a sports psychologist give Debbieabout how to motivate the players in her daughter’srugby team?AO2 (10 marks)Candidates need to apply their knowledge andunderstanding of strategies for motivating athletes.Answers may centre on the use of imagery (especiallyMG-M imagery), although should be extended to addressthe issue of how to do this. Answers could also centre onways of enhancing self-efficacy, self-confidence,competitiveness, or intrinsic motivation. These conceptsmay be linked in with each other or analysed separately.Better answers will engage closely with th

H567/03 Mark Scheme June 2018 6 USING THE MARK SCHEME Please study this Mark Scheme carefully. The Mark Scheme is an integral part of the process that begins with the setting of the question paper and ends with the awarding of grades. Question papers and Mark Schemes are d

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