The Positive Discipline School

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The Positive Discipline SchoolUsing solution focused discipline tobuild a powerful learning communitythat models mutual respect and supportsacademic excellence.We learn best from those with whom we are in caring, mutually respectfulrelationships that promote independence. Such supportive relationships enablestudents from diverse backgrounds to feel comfortable bringing their personalexperiences into the classroom, discover their common humanity and feel asthough they are viewed as assets to the school community.Learning First Alliance Every Child Learning: Safe and Supportive SchoolsTerry Chadsey and Jody McVittieCertified Positive Discipline AssociatesPositive Discipline g

We believe that schools have a critical choice to make in how we perceive andrespond to student misbehavior. When we follow familiar and traditional practice,we often act in ways that contradict our fundamental mission—to engage eachstudent in high levels of learning.Two Opposing Schools of Thought on Human BehaviorDominant and TraditionalPractice in AmericanSchoolsThe Positive Discipline(Solution Focused)ApproachCommon practicePavlov, Thorndike, SkinnerPeople respond to rewards andpunishments in theirenvironment.Adler, Driekurs, Glasser,Nelsen, Lott, DinkmeyerPeople seek a sense ofbelonging (connection) andsignificance (meaning) in theirsocial contextWhen do we have the mostinfluence on the behavior ofothers?At the moment of response toa specific behavior.In an ongoing relationshipfounded on mutual respect.What are the most powerfultools for adults?Control, rewards, andpunishmentsEmpathy, understanding theperspective of the student,collaborative problem solving,kind AND firm follow through“Respect” is Obedience and compliance inrelationships in which dignityand respect of the adult isprimaryMutual, in relationships inwhich each person is equallyworthy of dignity and respectResponse to inappropriatebehaviorCensure, isolation, punishmentNaming without shaming andblaming, focus on solutions,follow through, addressing thebelief behind the behaviorResponse to dangerous anddestructive behaviorCensure, isolation, punishmentStudent learning ismaximized when The adult has effective controlover student behaviorClear follow through withoutgetting in the way of thestudent experiencing theconsequence of their action.The student feels belongingand significance in theclassroomWho developed the theory?What motivates behavior?The Positive Discipline SchoolTerry Chadsey, MST and Jody McVittie, MDCertified Positive Discipline Associates2August 2006The Positive Discipline Associationwww.posdis.org

Building effective learning communities requires respectfulrelationships at all levelsFamilies &CommunitySchool-wideConsistent systems andpractices that promoterelationships based ondignity and mutual respectIndividualClassroomNow our community of students, teachers and parents work to act in a respectfulmanner for a more effective academic environment. We now have the knowledgeand skills to interact with each other in a way to support one other, therebyachieving a win/win situation. Before Positive Discipline at our school, respectwas a word, now it is actions. --Elementary principal (School population: 45% free/reduced lunch)In a Positive Discipline School, every adult Understands that the quality of relationships and school climate areabsolutely critical to successful student learning.Seeks to establish strong meaning and connection for students, families andstaff in social and academic contexts.Implements principles of mutual respect and encouragementFocuses on long term, solutions to misbehavior at individual, class andschool wide levels.Views mistakes as opportunities to learn and misbehavior as opportunities topractice critical life skills.Questions the tradition of adult control, rewards and punishments.The Positive Discipline SchoolTerry Chadsey, MST and Jody McVittie, MDCertified Positive Discipline Associates3August 2006The Positive Discipline Associationwww.posdis.org

In a Positive Discipline School, SystemsPrevention, Early Intervention and InterventionsWhen schools are thorough,systematic, and effective atthe levels 3 and 4, studentsmore quickly return tolevels 1 and 2.LEVEL 4Serious,chronic, anddangerousmisbehavior3-5% of studentsLEVEL 3Repeating and “more”serious misbehavior7-10% of studentsLEVEL 2Low-level misbehaviorWhen schools are thorough,systematic, and effective atlevels 1 and 2, fewer studentrise to higher levels ofmisbehavior.85 % of studentsLEVEL 1Prevention of misbehavior by:building positive emotional connections toschool for every student andengaging all students in learning andpracticing problem solving and empathyThe Positive Discipline SchoolTerry Chadsey, MST and Jody McVittie, MDCertified Positive Discipline Associates4August 2006The Positive Discipline Associationwww.posdis.org

Must Address Four Levels of Need:for Moderate and Serious MisbehaviorBehaviorTools--Team assessment and problem solving that includes familyLEVEL 4--Focus on building connection and encouragement.--Intensive academic supportChronic, dangerous,--Intensive social skills buildingrepeated, disruptive,--Respectfully and appropriately not interfering with students experiencingunsolvedthe consequences of their actions.--Agreements and consistent follow through and more.--Intensive social skills buildingLEVEL 3--Increased academic supportDisruptive, hurtful, conflict --Problem solving to address belief behind the behavior--Agreements and consistent follow throughgenerating--Non-punitive methods to “make amends” by contributing to the school--Classroom meetings and more--Seeingmistakes as opportunities to learnLEVEL 2--Non-punitive responses to misbehavior--Effective school-wide practice for looking at “system problems”Low level annoying and--classroom meetingsmildly disruptive and moreLEVEL 1Learning and practicingproblem solvingand social skills--Opportunities for meaningful learning and involvement of students.--School-wide focus on mutual respect and responsibility--School-wide focus on academics and building social skills--Effective engagement of students in setting school and classroomguidelines--Classroom meetings and more.Research suggests that comprehensive approaches to school discipline emphasizeteaching appropriate behavior (not just punishing), matching the level ofintervention to the level of behavioral challenge posed by each student, anddesigning integrated systems that deal with a full range of discipline challenges.Learning First Alliance Every Child Learning: Safe and Supportive SchoolsThe Positive Discipline SchoolTerry Chadsey, MST and Jody McVittie, MDCertified Positive Discipline Associates5August 2006The Positive Discipline Associationwww.posdis.org

A Successful Positive Discipline SchoolSTANDARDBEFORE implementationYear 1The school recognizes thatlearning occurs when theschool has a simultaneousfocus on school climate andacademic instruction.A focus on both academicachievement and discipline/schoolclimate are included in the first threeschool-wide goals.The school sets short term benchmarks for both academicachievement and discipline/school climate. Data iscollected and progress assessed.Discipline policies andprocedures:are clear and wellunderstood by allmembers of the schoolcommunity.focus on teaching skillsrather than sorting andseparating students.are founded on respectand dignity.The school provides theresources necessary tosupport its intended goals.The school discipline manual isreviewed and a process isestablished for ensuring consistencywith the goals and principles ofPositive Discipline.School discipline practices are targeted to address 3 levels:a) Prevention and social skills instruction/practice for allstudentsb) Early intervention and problem solving with clearfollow through in all classrooms, lunchroom, playground,office, etc.c) Intervention of multi-disciplinary team problem solvingand management for the smaller number of chronic,challenging behavior.Identify and allocate resources for 3years. This includes time andmoney for training as well as timeand money for informationmanagement.Full staff training and follow-up (total 21 hours) for thefirst year.Training of staff or community person in parent education.The school philosophy isexplicit about respect anddignity for every member ofthe school community.Discussion about school widediscipline and school climate haveincluded the school staff. Becominga Positive Discipline school has80% or greater staff buy in.The parent community is invited into the discussion aboutthe steps of changing the discipline policies.Focus is on the common goals of a safe, respectful learningenvironment for all students.The school is committed toputting “theory intopractice” in a step wisefashion.School leadership and majority ofstaff commit to systematicimplementation of PositiveDiscipline long term.By end of year regular class meetings in each classroom.Non-permissive, non-punitive tools become primarysystem for teaching appropriate social skills.Staff meetings are based on the class meeting format.The school is committed tocontinuous improvement ofindividual actions andsystems through:Data collectionEvaluation and reflectionData-based decisionmaking.Multi-disciplinary behaviorsupport team exists, meets atleast monthly and will reviewreferral data each month.Clear system in place forcollecting and monitoringstudent behavior data.Staff time is allocated daily forentering data, so that data iscurrent to within a week at alltimes.Implementation of the data collection system with at leastmonthly meetings of support team to review progress.School discipline manual is revised to be consistent withPositive Discipline as well as school and district policies.The Positive Discipline SchoolTerry Chadsey, MST and Jody McVittie, MDCertified Positive Discipline Associates6The behavior support team focuses on strengths andsolutions.Use final review to begin to benchmarks for followingyear.August 2006The Positive Discipline Associationwww.posdis.org

Requires Systematic Preparation and ImplementationYear 2Year 3Ongoing Follow up and EvaluationContinued setting benchmarks, collectingdata, monitoring and adjustingimplementation.Continued setting benchmarks, collectingdata, monitoring and adjustingimplementation.Consider “model school” status.Use of data to review effectiveness of allthree levels of approach and modifies/gainsfurther training as necessary.Use of data to review effectiveness of allthree levels of approach andmodifies/gains further training asnecessary.Use of data to review effectiveness of all threelevels of approach and modifies/gains furthertraining as necessary.5 hours (minimum) of PD follow up.Training for new staff available.5 hours (minimum) of PD follow up.Training for new staff available.Follow up from certified trainers is available, butexperienced teachers in the school now domentoring.Training for new staff available.Parent education available for parents.Begin assessment of how to engage familiesand other community members.Planning for parent peer groups.Parent education available for parents.Continue to assess and take steps familyand community engagement.Parent peer groups begin.Parent education available for parents.Continue to assess and take steps toward familyand community engagement.Parent peer groups in all grades.Regular student led classroom meetings.Student government uses the class meetingprocess to take on real and meaningfulproblems.Regular teachers helping teachers problemsolving sessions.Regular student led classroom meetings.Student government uses the classmeeting process to take on real andmeaningful problems.Regular teachers helping teachersproblem solving sessions.Regular student led classroom meetings.Student government uses the class meeting processto take on real and meaningful problems.Regular teacher helping teacher sessions.Implementation of the data collection systemwith at least monthly meetings of supportteam to review progress.Behavior support team focuses on strengthsand solutions.Using data reviews effectiveness of all threelevels of approach and modifies/gains furthertraining as necessaryContinue data collection system with atleast monthly meetings of support teamto review progress.Behavior support team focuses onstrengths and solutions.Using data reviews effectiveness of allthree levels of approach andmodifies/gains further training asnecessaryUse the end of year review to assessprogress and to target goals for followingyear.Continue data collection system with at leastmonthly meetings of support team to reviewprogress.Behavior support team focuses on strengths andsolutions.Using data reviews effectiveness of all three levelsof approach and modifies/gains further training asnecessary.Use the end of year review to assess progressand to target goals for following year.The Positive Discipline SchoolTerry Chadsey, MST and Jody McVittie, MDCertified Positive Discipline Associates7Use the end of year review to assess progress andto target goals for following year.August 2006The Positive Discipline Associationwww.posdis.org

“Instead of ignoring the problem I sat down with him and went over an exercisewith him. He learned how to do it. He felt better about himself. I started tointeract with him as a human being instead of a problem He started to feelbetter about himself and the antagonism between us has dissipated. In just a fewweeks his behavior has improved dramatically.” --High school teacherFor additional Information:The Positive Discipline Association (a 501c3 non profit corporation): www.posdis.orgJody McVittieCertified Positive Discipline Associate425-335-4460, jmcvittie@att.netTerry ChadseyCertified Positive Discipline Associate206-406-1293, terry@chadsey.usBooks:Positive Discipline in the Classroom, 3rd Ed. Jane Nelsen, Lynn Lott, Stephen Glenn. ThreeRivers Press, NY 2000.Positive Discipline: A Teachers A-Z Guide, Jane Nelsen, Linda Escobar, Kate Ortolano, RoslynDuffy, Deborah Owen-Sohocki. Prima Publishing 2001Other references:Learning First Alliance Every Child Learning: Safe and Supportive Schools. November 2001 Publishedby Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Available on line athttp://www.learningfirst.org/pdfs/safe schools report.pdfNorris, Jacqueline, “Looking at Classroom Management Through a Social and Emotional LearningLens” Theory into Practice, Volume 42, Number 4, Autumn, 2003, p 315Sugai, G, Sprague J.R, Horner, R.H., Walker, H.M. Preventing School Violence: The Use of OfficeDiscipline Referrals to Assess and Monitor School-Wide Discipline Interventions. Journal ofEmotional and Behavioral Disorders, Summer arch also shows that building a sense of community in schools is an integralpart of creating a positive learning environment. Community building begins on the firstday students and teachers come together. It is here that social and emotional learningcan be integrated into classroom life. Here, social emotional learning is seen not as anadd-on for the teacher but the way that relationships, routines, and procedures areestablished so everyone feels cared for, respected, and valued.Jacqueline A. Norris, “Looking at Classroom Management Througha Social and Emotional Learning Lens”The Positive Discipline SchoolTerry Chadsey, MST and Jody McVittie, MDCertified Positive Discipline Associates8August 2006The Positive Discipline Associationwww.posdis.org

the school community. Discussion about school wide discipline and school climate have included the school staff. Becoming a Positive Discipline school has 80% or greater staff buy in. The parent community is invited into the discussion about the steps of changing the discipline policies. Focus is on the common goals of a safe, respectful learning

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