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Prairie View A&M UniversityA Member of The Texas A&M University SystemPrairie View, TexasWhitlowe R. Green College of EducationDepartment of Curriculum and InstructionReading ProgramCOURSE OUTLINE/SYLLABUSRDNG 3643-P01 METH OF TCHNG ELEM2013 Spring SemesterInstructor Name:Office Location:Office Telephone:E-Mail Address:Snail Mail:Office Hours:Dr. Clarissa Gamble Booker, Tenured ProfessorWilhelmina Fitzgerald Delco Building, Room 315936-261-3408FAX: 936-261-3419cgbooker@pvamu.eduNoneTuesday8:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m.; 3:30 p.m.- 5:30 p.m.Wednesday 9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m., By AppointmentDepartmental Meetings, Sponsor Student Organizations,School-University Partnerships, Clerical DutiesThursday8:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m.; 3:30 p.m.- 5:30 p.m.Saturday9:00 a.m.-10:00 a.m.; 2:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m., ByAppointmentVirtual Office Hours: NoneCourse Locations:Sam R. Collins Engr Tech Bldg., Room 225John B. Coleman LibraryClass Meeting Days and Time:Tuesday, Thursday 11:00 a.m.-12:20 p.m.Course Abbreviation and Number RDNG 3643-P01COURSE TITLE AND CREDIT HOURSMethods of Teaching Elementary Reading. (3-0) Credit 3 semester hours.COURSE DESCRIPTIONAnalysis of various approaches and methods used in teaching reading in the elementary grades.Prerequisites: NoneCo-requisites: NoneCopyright 2011 by Dr. Clarissa G. Booker. All rights reserved. No part of this document may be altered, reproduced, or transmitted in anyform, by any means (electronic, photocopying, recording, or otherwise) without the prior written permission of the owner.1

Required Textbook:Roe, B.D., & Smith, S.H. (2012). Teaching reading in today’s elementary schools(11th ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, Cengage Learning.ISBN: 13:978-1-111-29812-8ISBN: 10-1-111-29812-2Professional References:Florida Center for Reading Researchhttp://www.fcrr.orgSpurgin, T. (2009). The art of reading. Chantilly, VA: The Teaching Company.Strunk, W., & White, E.B. (2000). The elements of style (4th ed.). New York: Longman.Texas Examinations of Educator Standards (TExES) Preparation ResourcesCertify Teacher Preparation software for Educator 09-9986CliffNotes. (2010). TExES generalist EC-6. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley Publishing Company.www.cliffnotes.comKortz, J., Hester, V., Green, V., & Mentze, M. (2010). Pass the TExES generalist EC-6.Dallas, TX: Ed Publishing and Consulting. www.passthetexes.comRosado, L.A. (2010). The best teachers’ test preparation for the TExES 191 generalist EC-6.Piscataway, NJ.: Research & Education s, K., & Mantze, M. (2009). English language arts and reading 4-8. Dallas, TX:Ed Publishing and Consulting.www.passthetexes.comTexas Education Agency. (2006). Texas examinations of educator standards: Preparationmanual: Preparation manual 117 English language arts and reading 4-8.Austin, TX: Texas Education Agency.Texas Education Agency. (2011). Texas examinations of educator standards: Preparationmanual 191 generalist EC-6. Austin, TX: Texas Education Agency.Wynne, S. (2008). TExES English language arts and reading 4-8 117. Boston: XAMonline,Inc.www.xamonline.comAccess to Learning Resources:Prairie View A&M University LibraryTelephone: 936-261-1500Web: http://www.tamu.edu/pvamu/libraryUniversity BookstoreTelephone: 936-261-1990Web: http://www.bkstr.com/Home/10001-10734-1?demoKey dWhitlowe R. Green College of Education TExES Prep LabWilhelmina Fitzgerald Delco Building, Room 332HoursMonday-Friday9:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon; 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.2

Assessment and Artifacts:The assignments completed in RDNG 3643 will be considered “artifacts” (an item of coursework that serves as evidence that course objectives are met) and will be loaded into eCoursesMOODLE. These required artifacts will be identified by the instructor. Due dates for theseartifacts will be announced prior to the due dates. Maintain copies of your artifacts for yourrecords.McKinney-Vento Act (Federal Law) 2011The McKinney-Vento program for Pre-K–16 is authorized under Title VII-B of the McKinneyVento Homeless Assistance Act (42 USC 11431 et seq.). The program was originally authorizedin 1987 and, most recently, reauthorized by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001.The program is designed to address the problems that homeless children and youth have faced inenrolling, attending, and succeeding in school. Under this program, State educational agenciesmust ensure that each homeless child and youth has equal access to the same free, appropriatepublic education, including a public preschool education, as other children and youth. Homelesschildren and youth should have access to the educational and other services that they need toenable them to meet the same challenging State student academic achievement standards towhich all students are held. In addition, homeless students may not be separated from themainstream school environment. States, school districts, colleges and universities are required toreview and undertake steps to revise laws, regulations, practices, or policies that may act as abarrier to the enrollment, attendance, or success in school of homeless children and youth.State Board for Educator Certification TexasEducator’s Code of EthicsTexas Administrative Code 247.2Statement of Affirmation[Handout—Distributed in Class]Texas Education Agency. (2011). The dyslexia handbook revised 2007, updated 2010:Procedures concerning dyslexia and related disorders. Austin, TX: TexasEducation ED/htm/ED.38.htm#38.0033

PURPOSE OF THE COURSE:To develop competencies which will enable a candidate to achieve a satisfactory score on theTexas Examinations of Educator Standards (TExES) .COURSE GOALS: RDNG 3643 focuses on goals identified in the Whitlowe R. Green Collegeof Education CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK: Educators as Facilitators of Learning forDiverse Populations (E-FOLD-P). E-FOLD-P is fundamental to learning content in all areasand in teaching a diverse population. It is designed to achieve these outcomes:1.Develop the reading teacher as a problem-solver, critical thinker, and decision maker.2.Develop the reading teacher as a reflective and a continual learner utilizing effectiveteaching practices.3.Develop the reading teacher as a facilitator of student growth and development, byprecept and example.4.Develop the reading teacher who demonstrates an understanding and appreciation ofhuman diversity and global awareness.4

Professional Education UnitConceptual FrameworkThe conceptual framework for both the basic and advanced programs at Prairie View A&MUniversity has evolved over the last fourteen years to view educators as facilitators of learningfor diverse populations. The conceptual Framework was developed by the Unit faculty afterextensive review of the literature in education and guidelines of learned societies. Theconceptual framework is based upon current issues such as changes in demographics, globalperspectives, importance of problem solving, critical thinking and decision-making skills,technological demands, and the need for life-long learning. This new visual depiction of theconceptual framework with no changes in the wording was adopted by the Teacher Educationfaculty, in February 2008.The framework consists of four major goals anchored bytechnology.5

Required Assignments:Assignment 1Reading Approaches(Oral, Written, and PowerPoint Presentation)Educator Standards Domains-Competencies: I-IX, XI, XIIAssignment 2TExES Reading Study Guides and ExaminationsEducator StandardsAssignment 3Domains-Competencies: I-IX, XI, XIITEKS Reading Lesson Plans and Instructional StrategiesEducator StandardsAssignment 4Domains-Competencies: I-XIIGroup Project--SPRING READING WORKSHOPEducator StandardsAssignment 5Domains-Competencies: I-XIIBook Discussion and Reflection PaperiREAD Book - Office of the Dean, Whitlowe R. Green College ofEducationJohnson, S. (2010). The present: The secret to enjoying your workand life, now! New York: Broadway Books.ISBN: 978-0-307-71954-6[Educator Standards: Domains-Competencies: IX, XI, XII]Scientifically-Based Reading Research:Ambruster, B.B., Lehr, F., Osborn, J., Adler. (2006). A child becomes a reader: Provenideas from research for parents (3rd ed.). Jessup, MD. National Institute forLiteracy.http://www.nifl.gov Download[TExES Domains-Competencies: 001, 002, 003, 004, 005, 006]Ambruster, B.B., Lehr, F., Osborn, J., Adler, C.R., & Noonis, L.T. (2006). Put reading firstkindergarten through grade 3: The research building blocks for teaching childrento read (3rd ed.). Jessup, MD: National Institute for Literacy at ED ExES Domains-Competencies: 001, 002, 003, 004, 005, 006]Texas Examinations of Educator Standards Preparation Manuals: 191 Generalist EC-6;Generalist 4-8 111; English Language Arts and Reading 4-8 117; English Language Artsand Reading 131; Special Education EC-12 161, etc.National Reading Panel. (2000). National Reading Panel report. Washington, DC:Department of Education. Available online at http://www.nationalreadingpanel.org(This report can be read online or downloaded or a free copy can be ordered.)1.2.3.4.5.Phonemic AwarenessPhonicsFluencyVocabularyText Comprehension[Domain-Competencies 001, 002, 003][Domain-Competencies 001, 002, 003][Domain-Competency 006]Domain-Competency 004][Domain-Competencies: 006, 007]6

Executive Summary Reprint Excerpt from “Teaching Reading IS Rocket Science,” by Louisa Moat(1999). American Federation of Teachers. Reprinted with permission.[Handout-Distributed In Class]COURSE OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES:Upon completion of RDNG 3643, the candidate will be able to demonstrate competencies andlevels of achievement as listed below.1. Discuss the teacher's role in the teaching of reading. http://www.sbec.state.tx.us[STANDARD I EC-6; STANDARD I English Language Arts and Reading 4-8; ELAR 8-12;Special Education EC-12].2. Research and discuss definitions of reading as defined by authorities in the field[STANDARD IV EC-6, STANDARD II ELAR 4-8].3. Understand various approaches used to teach reading.[STANDARDS IV EC-6; STANDARD II ELAR 4-8].Course Learning OutcomesCore Curriculum1,4,5,64. Discuss the historical overviews of various approaches used to teach reading[STANDARD II ELAR 4-8].Course Learning OutcomesCore Curriculum1,4,5,65. Research and discuss the following reading approaches: Basal Reader Approaches, LiteratureBased Approaches, Language Experiences Approaches, Individualized Reading Approaches,Whole Language, Linguistics Approach, Phonics Approach, Programmed Instruction,Computer Assisted Instruction, Eclectic Approaches, and other reading approaches.[STANDARDS I-XII EC-6; STANDARDS I-VIII ELAR 4-8; 8-12; Special EducationEC-12]. Course Learning OutcomesCore Curriculum1,4,5,66. Analyze methodologies used to teach reading in the elementary grades.[STANDARD IV EC-6; STANDARD V ELAR 4-8; ELAR 8-12].Course Learning OutcomesCore Curriculum1,4,5,67. Identify organizational strategies (e.g., grouping) for the reading program[STANDARD X EC-6; STANDARD X ELAR 4-8].8. Identify strategies and activities for improving these aspects of reading: word recognitionskills, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension skills, and study skills.[STANDARDS II, III, V EC-6; STANDARD III ELAR 4-8].9. Understand the roles of oral and silent reading[STANDARD VI EC-6; STANDARD III ELAR 4-8].Course Learning OutcomesCore Curriculum1,4,5,610. Research, discuss, and submit assigned reading study guides.[STANDARDS I-XII EC-Grade 6; STANDARDS I-VIII 4-8].11. Demonstrate an understanding of the objectives of Educator Standards: EnglishLanguage Arts and Reading Generalist EC-6; English Language Arts and Reading 4-8;English Language Arts and Reading 8-12 Standards; Special Education EC-12, etc.12. Prepare and demonstrate teaching lessons on five key areas of reading instruction:phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and text comprehension NationalReading Panel, 2000). Use the English Language Arts and Reading (ELAR), andSpanish Language Arts and Reading (SLAR) Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills pter110/index.html[STANDARDS I-XII EC-6; STANDARDS I-VIII Grades 4-8].7

13. Demonstrate the ability to use communication skills (oral, written, andpresentation) in the reading program[STANDARDS I, II, IX EC-6; STANDARDS I,III, VII 4-8].Course Learning Outcomes Core Curriculum 1,4,5, 614. Demonstrate the ability to integrate use of technology in the reading program[STANDARDS I-XII EC-6; STANDARDS I-VIII 4-8].Course Learning Outcomes Core Curriculum15. Demonstrate an appreciation of cultural diversity1,6[STANDARDS VI, VII EC-6; STANDARD III 4-8].16. Demonstrate an understanding of competencies for the TExESExaminations of Educator Standards (TExES) [STANDARDS I-XII EC-; STANDARDS I-VIII 4-8].17. Demonstrate an understanding of the English Language ProficiencyStandards (ELPS).18. Demonstrate an understanding of the College & Career ReadinessStandards (CCRS).8

Quality Without CompromiseClosing the LoopThe Six Question Model at Prairie View A&M UniversityHowWillItAss beessed?WhenWill itBeAssessed?MeatWh reWe eTh ow t itoH keMa pen?pHasegietarStWhatIsDesired?Useof ResultsWhaD id tYouDo?OutcomeCycleDana/Thomas-Smith/Closing the Loop Six Question Model/landscape9

EDUCATOR STANDARDS:ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS AND READING GENERALIST EC-6 Standard I.Oral Language: Teachers of young students understand the importance of orallanguage, know the developmental processes of oral language, and provide avariety of instructional opportunities for young students to develop listening andspeaking skills.Standard II. Phonological and Phonemic Awareness: Teachers of young students understandthe components of phonological and phonemic awareness and utilize a varietyof approaches to help young students develop this awareness and its relationshipto written language.Standard III. Alphabetic Principle: Teachers of young students understand the importance ofthe alphabetic principle to reading English, know the elements of the alphabeticprinciple, and provide instruction that helps students understand that printedwords consist of graphic representations that relate to the sounds of spokenlanguage in conventional and intentional ways.Standard IV. Literacy Development and Practice: Teachers of young students understand thatliteracy develops over time and progresses from emergent to proficient stages.Teachers use a variety of contexts to support the development of youngstudents’ literacy.Standard V. Word Analysis and Decoding: Teachers understand the importance of wordanalysis and decoding to reading and provide many opportunities for studentsto improve word analysis and decoding abilities.Standard VI. Reading Fluency: Teachers understand the importance of fluency to readingcomprehension and provide many opportunities for students to improve readingfluency.Standard VII. Reading Comprehension: Teachers understand the importance of reading forunderstanding, know the components of comprehension, and teach studentsstrategies for improving comprehension.Standard VIII. Development of Written Communication: Teachers understand that writing tocommunicate is a developmental process and provide instruction that helpsstudents develop competence in written communication.Standard IX. Writing Conventions: Teachers understand how young students use writingconventions and how to help students develop those conventions.Standard X. Assessment and Instruction of Developing Literacy: Teachers understand thebasic principles of assessment and use a variety of literacy assessment practicesto plan and implement literacy instruction for young students.Standard XI: Research and Inquiry Skills: Teachers understand the importance of study andinquiry skills as tools for learning and promote students’ development in applyingstudy and inquiry skills.Standard XII: Viewing and Representing: Teachers understand how to interpret, analyze,evaluate, and produce.10

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS AND READING(Grades 4-8) dard I.Oral Language: Teachers of students in grades 4-8 understand the importance oforal language, know the developmental processes of oral language, and providea variety of instructional opportunities for students to develop listening andspeaking skills.Standard II. Foundations of Reading: Teachers of students in grades 4-8 understand thefoundations of reading and early literacy development.Standard III. Word Analysis Skills and Reading Fluency: Teachers understand the importanceof word analysis (including decoding, blending, structural analysis, sight wordvocabulary) and reading fluency and provide many opportunities for students topractice and improve their word analysis skills and reading fluency.Standard IV. Reading Comprehension: Teachers understand the importance of reading forunderstanding, know the components of comprehension, and teach studentsstrategies for improving their comprehension.Standard V. Written Language: Teachers understand that writing is a developmental processand provide instruction that helps students develop competence in writtencommunication.Standard VI. Study and Inquiry Skills: Teachers understand the importance of study andinquiry skills as tools for learning and promote students’ development in applyingstudy and inquiry skills.Standard VII. Viewing and Representing: Teachers understand how to interpret, analyze,evaluate, and produce visual images and messages in various media and toprovide students with opportunities to develop skills in this area.Standard VIII. Assessment of Developing Literacy: Teachers understand the basic principlesof assessment and use a variety of literacy assessment practices to plan andimplement instruction.VOCABULARY TERMS will be assigned by the professor of the course. Refer to additionalreferences and TExES professional resources.Notes:11

COURSE EVALUATION:The course evaluation will be based upon the teacher’s ACADEMIC FREEDOM toevaluate each student.The evaluation methods for the course will be cumulative and summative:Cumulative Evaluations will take place periodically either announced or unannounced todetermine the degree and extent of proficiency of the content and extent of learning outcomes ofthe course and expected knowledge on the Texas Examinations of Educator Standards (TExES).Summative Evaluation will be made on a scheduled and announced date at the end of thecourse. The summative evaluation is to determine the gross learning over the full content of thecourse and the expected content of the Texas Examinations of Educator Standards (TExES).The course evaluation will be based upon:Classroom Attendance, Classroom Participation,and High Quality Completion of Assignments50%Mid-Semester Examination and Portfolio20%Scheduled Practice ExaminationsNo Credit GivenFinal Examination20%Ethics, Professional Development10%and Leadership1. Attendance and Participation at Professional Meetings2. Membership in Professional Organizations3. Attendance and Participation at Century II Book Reviews4. Reading and Writing of Professional Articles5. Professional Attire and Decorum6. Professional Leadership Characteristics7. Documented Evidence of Community Service8. Documented Professional ExamplesGRADING SYSTEM FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS*Grades in the course will be assigned as follows:A 90-100I IncompleteB 80-89W Withdrawal from a courseC 70-79WV Withdrawal from the University VoluntarilyD 60-69MW Military WithdrawalF 0-59*This Grading System is in accordance with the University’s undergraduate catalog, 2005-2007

Texas Education Agency. (2006). Texas examinations of educator standards: Preparation manual: Preparation manual 117 English language arts and reading 4-8. Austin, TX: Texas Education Agency. Texas Education Agency. (2011). Texas examinations of educator standards: Preparation manual 191 generalist EC-6. Austin, TX: Texas Education Agency.

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